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Weekly Farm Newsletter

December 12th: Last week of CSA deliveries 2016

Tentative CSA menu:

Leeks
Trim the roots and store in a sealed bag in the fridge

Gold Potatoes
Store in a cool dark place

Butternut Squash (Full Share)
Store at room temperature

Acorn Squash (Medium Share)
Store at room temperature

Garlic
Does not need to be refrigerated

Baby Romaine
Store in the fridge

Onions
Do not need refrigerated

Turnips
Store in a sealed bag in the fridge

Red Cabbage
Store in the fridge

Kale
Store in a sealed bag in the fridge

Our 2017 CSA season is now OPEN for signups

Join and pay in full by March 15th to receive our 5% Early Bird Discount

It's the last week of CSA deliveries of 2016! Monday morning began with an icy two-hour delay for all farm workers. The end of our growing season is undeniably here. As avid weather app watchers, we wasted no time as the cold front was predicted to hit our area and pulled up all the remaining leeks in the field. They were a little frozen and hard to remove from the ground but they are all unharmed and tastier than ever. In our packing house, we take the time to dunk and soak their roots in water to help remove the excess soil that leeks retain. This can be a very cold and wet job to tackle first thing in the morning for some but you can guarantee everyone is craving potato leek soup by lunch. Most of us who work at the farm would say that our lives absolutely revolve around food. It is impossible not to scheme up dinner while handling and working with fresh food and ingredients all day long. Even if you are not into cooking when you start working here, you cannot deny the exposure and curiosity to all this great stuff. We have a great crew of young people working for us and the mood on the farm right now is excitement. All of us are true seasonal employees who put in major hours during the farming months of the year. So, it is safe to say that we are all looking forward to our winter break and the holidays with our families. Some will have shorter breaks than others. We will begin seeding transplants in the greenhouse in mid-January with our greenhouse team back part-time by the end of February. Our 2 year-round guys will have plenty to do in the offseason when we can focus on repairs, mechanical issues, and future field plans. My job will be switching gears and staying indoors all day maintaining the CSA signups and website from an office. As for most everyone else who handles your produce, they will return in April along with the start of our 2017 CSA deliveries. We hope everyone enjoyed being a member of Spiral Path this year and we feel like we had a heck of a season; free of hail, major crop failure, and other devastating realities that farmers face on daily basis. We know that there are so many options of how and where you can get your food these days and we are grateful that you chose to support our farm directly by being a CSA member. Your trust in us to provide you with fresh organic produce by using sustainable farming methods that protect our environment has enabled our farm to thrive through the local food movement. We hope to continue to strengthen the health of our communities and provide a long-lasting relationship with our supporting members.
*Happy Holidays to you and your family from the Brownbacks and Spiral Path Farm*

Khaya's Korner: First Snowfall

I don't know when the first snowfall will be, I just hope it will come soon. I love sledding, hot chocolate, ice skating, building snow forts, snowball fights, and finally: making snow angels. I also love getting into the holiday spirit by baking some Christmas cookies. My favorite kinds of Christmas cookies to bake are: sugar cookies, gingerbread cookies, snickerdoodles, peanut butter blossoms, and, of course, chocolate chip cookies. Usually my grandma, Terra, comes over and makes cookies, but sometimes we go to my Uncle Lucas's house. That is definitely something to look forward to! Also, we normally would be getting our tree in a week, so that's another thing to look forward to as well. Anyway, I hope everyone has a good holiday season, because my next Khaya's Korner will be the last one for a year. ~ Until then, Khaya

Butternut Squash and Cider Bisque
4 Tbsp (1/2 Stick) unsalted butter
2 C onions, diced
4 tsp curry powder
1 butternut squash
2 apples
3 C vegetable or chicken stock
1 C apple cider
Salt and pepper to taste
Melt the butter in a large kettle and sauté the onions and curry powder over very low heat for about 25 minutes.
Meanwhile, peel the squash and apples and cut them into chunks (if you find the squash too hard to cut, bake it in a 400 F oven for about 20 minutes before peeling and cubing it). Add the squash, apples, and stock to the kettle and simmer for 25 minutes. Mash the solids with a potato masher.
Return pureed bisque to the kettle; add the cider and season to taste with salt and pepper.

Butternut-Apple Crisp Bars
3 cups sliced peeled butternut squash
3 cups sliced peeled tart apples
1 cup packed light brown sugar
2 tsp lemon juice
1 tsp ground cinnamon
1/8 tsp ground cloves
1 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
6 tbsp unsalted butter, softened
1/3 cup chopped nuts
Ice cream (optional)
Preheat the oven to 350 F. Grease a 9 inch square baking pan.
Combine the squash and apple slices with 1/2 cup of the brown sugar, lemon juice, cinnamon, cloves, tossing gently, in a large bowl. Turn into the prepared pan, cover with aluminum foil, and bake for 30 minutes.
Meanwhile, combine the flour, the remaining 1/2 cup brown sugar and the salt. Stir in the butter with a fork until crumbly. Add the nuts. Spread evenly over the squash-apple mixture.
Bake uncovered for 40 minutes more. Cut into 9 squares; top with ice cream, if desired, and serve.

December 5th

This week's projected CSA menu:

Leeks
Trim the roots and store in a sealed bag in the fridge
Gold Potatoes
Store in a cool dark place
Butterkin Squash
Store at room temperature
Baby Kale
Store in the fridge
Grape Tomatoes
Store at room temperature
Onions
Do not need refrigerated
Turnips
Store in a sealed bag in the fridge
Shallots
Store in bag at room temperature
Tuscan Kale
Store in a sealed bag in the fridge
Garlic
Store at room temperature
Acorn Squash (Full Share Only)
Store at room temperature

Our 2017 CSA season is now OPEN for signups

Join and pay in full by March 15th to receive our 5% Early Bird Discount

Our annual big leek harvest happened this past weekend. We know many of you have been patiently waiting for these babies and they are finally in. Leeks take a very long time to grow so theses were planted back in July to set their roots and establish themselves until now. Leeks will flourish and grow in cold and wet conditions and with the extended warm weather this year, we were beginning to feel like we were playing a 'waiting game' so that they would be as big as possible (for you) before our CSA season ends. Leeks impart a mellow, sweet oniony flavor and are much less pungent than its close relatives: garlic, onions, and shallots. To use: trim the roots off the leek. You can use the entire green stem for flavor but the white part will contain the most strength. Most people cut them into thin ringlets and they can be sautéed until translucent or added to any dish. Leeks are extremely rich in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. The most common use is in the popular Potato Leek Soup, recipe on the back. Small thin leeks are great for grilling or roasting whole on a steak or veggie tray. More great ways to use leeks: in omelets, cheesesteaks, fried breakfast potatoes, cream sauce, gravy, Asian stir-fry, and pizza.
Our baby kale is growing happily in one of our unheated greenhouses this time of year. It is great for raw massaged kale salads, soup, or my new favorite – pesto! Our baby kale and garlic can whip into a delicious fresh pesto. Top it off with some of the surprise grape tomatoes in the box and toss it in some angel hair pasta.
This is the last harvest of our sweet Japanese white turnips. By now, their green tops are not holding up very well outdoors in the wind and cold so we have chopped them off and are sending them loose to you. More butterkin squash is headed your way in our efforts to "clean-house" and get everything that can store for months in your house to you before the season ends. Do not feel pressure to use fast they will store!

Khaya's Korner: Moving Update

I just wanted to let everyone know that my family and I have completely moved in to the farmhouse. My parents bought the farm and sold our old house all in one day. Not to mention, they also had to do it while watching my sick baby sister. Anyway, we're hoping to unpack the last "few" boxes in the next couple of weeks. My bedroom is a little messy, but it has all of my furniture and decorations in it. The only other thing left to do is have my mom paint my sister's bedroom. Also, we have to get my sister moved in. I just wanted to let you guys know that we are all moved in, safe and sound. ~ Khaya

POTATO LEEK SOUP
Scrub potatoes, about 5-6 cups, do not peel and cube into small pieces. Slice 2-3 leeks (I use the green parts too nearly 1/2 way up to the leaves) Sauté in olive oil. Optional: to make a leek-kale- potato soup, finely mince one bunch of Tuscan kale and wilt with the leeks. Add potatoes, 1 T salt, 1 t pepper. Barely cover with water. Bring to a boil and simmer for 45 minutes. For a perfectly smooth soup, puree in a blender, if kale was added, it will be a beautiful shade of green. For the chunkier version, which we prefer, simply mash by hand in the kettle with a hand masher. Add 2 C whole milk or half and half cream plus about 2 C shredded cheddar cheese.
Other things that can be added to Potato Leek Soup to clean out your fridge: broccoli, carrots, turnips, frozen corn, etc.

Leek Quiche
1 -9-inch pie crust
3 eggs whisked into 2 cups milk with 1/2 t salt, Pinch pepper
3/4 cup grated cheddar cheese
2 cup sliced leeks and 1/2 C grated potatoes
1C chopped ham-optional
Roll pie dough into a 9-inch pie pan. Dust pie crust with flour. Arrange leeks, cheese, potatoes, ham into pie pan. Pour egg mix over veggies. Sprinkle dot of butter on top. Bake at 375 for 30 minutes, or until set. Let stand 10 minutes.

Baby Kale Pesto
1 cup Olive Oil
2.5 cups of Baby Kale
1/4 cup of Sunflower Seeds or Pine Nuts
1/3 cup of Parmesan Cheese
1/4 tsp. Salt
1/8 cup of garlic (whole cloves)
Blend oil, garlic, and salt in a blender
Add baby kale through the hole in top
Lastly add the nuts and cheese
Pesto freezes easy if you have extra

Butterkin Squash Risotto
1 quart chicken stock, 1 cup water, 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 small onion, chopped, 2 cloves garlic, grated or chopped
2 cups Arborio rice, 1 cup dry white wine
2 C cooked and pureed butterkin squash
Nutmeg, grated, to taste, 2 tablespoons butter, 7 or 8 leaves fresh sage, slivered
1 cup grated Parmigiano Reggiano
Directions:
Bring 1 quart stock plus 1 cup water to a simmer in a sauce pot then reduce heat to low.
Heat a medium skillet over medium to medium-high heat with olive oil. When oil ripples, add the onions and garlic and soften 2 to 3 minutes. Add rice and toast 2 to 3 minutes more. Add wine and cook it out completely, stirring occasionally, 2 to 3 minutes. Ladle in stock in intervals, a couple of ladles at a time. Allow liquids to evaporate each time. Risotto will cook 18 minutes, total, from the first addition of liquid. Defrost the squash in your microwave in a dish to collect any liquids and stir in squash the last 3 minutes of cook time, season with nutmeg, salt, and pepper to taste. In the last minute of cooking time, stir in butter in small pieces, sage leaves, and cheese, serve.

Week of November 28

Tentative CSA menu:

Carrots
Store in the fridge

Sweet Potatoes
Store at room temperature

Butterkin Squash
Store at room temperature

Red Cabbage
Store in the fridge

Broccoli
Store in an opened bag in the fridge

Onions
Do not need refrigerated

Kale
Store in a sealed bag in the fridge

Garlic
Store at room temperature

Grape Tomatoes
Store at room temperature

The final weeks of harvesting are upon us. With 3 weeks to go in our CSA season, our fields are slowly being picked and cleared out. Some plants, like kale, can be harvested multiple times each. One kale plant is harvested about 3 separate times if we strip it just right by always leaving the smaller leaves to grow on the top and continue producing. We do not usually cut our kale with a knife at the stem. We would rather strip the leaves, by hand, off the side like you would on a rosemary sprig so that we can have many weeks' worth of food off the same plant. It is amazing how much plants want to live and thrive- especially in this weather. You may have noticed that our kale is changing in color and has much 'tighter curls' in the late fall/winter than the leafy variety we have in the summer. Cold kale begins to take on a yellowish color which is completely healthy and a natural occurrence in this weather. Remember the kale raab at the beginning of the season? If all goes well this winter, these plants will eventually begin to produce yellow flowers at the top, deeming it kale raab/rabi. All plants will go to flower/seed if they can continue to grow past production. All living species want to survive and reproduce and that is exactly what the kale is beginning to do. Flowering kale is much sweeter than dark green summer kale -so, enjoy it in its prime season!

'Believe it or not' these grape tomatoes are not from a greenhouse. We harvested these tomatoes right before the impending frost when they were still green on the vine. After successfully storing for weeks in our warm sweet potato cooler, they are red and ripe. A wonderful surprise and payback for the labor we put into saving them before the killing frost. There are so many small steps we can take as growers that will all lead to a larger decision of farming sustainably and producing more food and less waste.

Our favorite pumpkin variety, butterkin squash, is back in the box this week. I added a cookie recipe on the back that is a huge hit in my household and on the Thanksgiving dessert table this year. Remember, once you bake any variety of squash you can always freeze the leftover puree in easy bags for the winter... Pumpkin soup or cookies in February!

Our last CSA delivery of the season will be the week of December 12th

2017 signups will go live on December 5th

Receive a 5% Early Bird Discount off your membership price if you join and pay in full by March 15th
Consider gifting someone food and health with a 4-week Sampler Share for the holiday.

Pumpkin Cookies made from butterkin squash! From Joyce Kozlowski
2 C Flour
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp salt
1 C shortening
1 C sugar
1 C pumpkin / butterkin squash
1 egg
1 tsp vanilla
Sift together first 5 ingredients. In a separate bowl, cream shortening and sugar together. Add pumpkin, egg and vanilla and mix thoroughly. Add dry ingredients. Bake at 350 degrees on ungreased cookie sheets about 10-12 minutes.
Caramel Icing:
3 Tbs butter
4 Tbs milk
1/2 C brown sugar
1 C sifted powdered sugar
3/4 tsp vanilla
Boil first 3 ingredients 2 minutes stirring constantly. Cool and stir in remaining ingredients. Beat until smooth and creamy. Ice cookies immediately. Icing can be reheated. Makes 3+ dozen

Kale & Potato Soup
3-4 Medium Potatoes cut in chunks
5-6 Cups Kale washed and cut
11-12 Cups Chicken Stock
1 Large Onion, chopped
2 Cloves Garlic, minced
2 Bay Leaves
4 Andouille, Chorizo, or Hot Italian Sausage. I prefer Andouille; quartered and cut
1 tsp salt
2 Tbs Olive Oil
Sauté onion in olive oil, then add garlic.
When onion turns transparent, add sausage. Stir together.
Add Kale, stir, cooking 2 or 3 minutes.
Add Chicken Broth.
Scrape bottom of pot to loosen bits.
Add Potatoes, bay leaves, salt and stir.
Cover & bring to a boil.
Simmer 1 hour.

Carrot & Squash Soup From CSA Member Alison Rosen
1 butternut squash (or butterkin), 1/2 onion chopped, 1 turnip chopped, 2 carrots chopped, 3 c. vegetable broth, 1 c. applesauce, 1/4 t. cardomon, 1/4 t. nutmeg, 1 t. grated ginger
Half and seed the squash. Microwave covered squash until soft enough to cut into 1" cubes. Put all ingredients in a soup pot and simmer. When all vegetables are soft, remove from heat and cool. Puree all ingredients in a blender and reheat. If too thick, add more broth. If too thin, add more applesauce.

Black Bean Sweet Potato Burritos
3 cups sweet potatoes (diced with skins on) & 1/2 onion (chopped)
Sautee in large frypan in 1 t oil just until tender. Add water or apple juice as needed to prevent sticking.
2 C cooked black beans, 1 t ground cumin, 3/4 t ground cinnamon, 1/2 t salt Add and cook until heated through.
8 flour tortillas & 1- 1/2 cups cheddar cheese (shredded)
-Divide bean mixture and cheese among the tortillas and roll up. Place in a 9x13" baking pan. Lightly spray with olive oil if desired. Cover pan with foil and bake at 350F for 20-25 minutes. Garnish with sour cream, salsa, and fresh cilantro.

Silver Spring MD CSA Pickup 11.26

Tentative Share Menu:
Spaghetti Squash -Full Share
Acorn Squash - Medium Share
Napa Cabbage
Nicola Gold Potatoes
Garlic
Brussel Sprouts
Baby Spinach
Collard Greens
Broccoli
Onions

November 21 Thanksgiving Week

This week's projected CSA menu:

Nicola Gold Potatoes
Store in a cool dark place

Butternut Squash
Store at room temperature

Napa Cabbage
Store in the fridge

Broccoli
Store in an opened bag in the fridge

Onions
Do not need refrigerated

Collard Greens
Store in a sealed bag in the fridge

Garlic
Store at room temperature

Japanese White Turnips
Remove edible greens and store both separately in the fridge in bags

Baby Spinach
Store in the fridge

Brussel Sprouts (Full Share Only)
Store in the fridge

Red Beets (Full Share only)
Store in the fridge

Our Last CSA delivery will be made on the week of December 12th!

2017 signups will go live on December 5th

Happy Thanksgiving to you and your family from Spiral Path Farm!
Many people ask us what our typical Thanksgiving meal looks like as vegetable farmers. It's true that the sides do make the meal for us and although we do roast the traditional turkey, we bake heavily with all the different veggies in season. When my mom, so kindly, emailed my siblings and I to request our favorite sides for the big meal, we all quickly replied with basically the CSA menu for the week. Check out the recipes below that we will be preparing and making as a family together. Our favorite way of making mashed potatoes is mixing in turnips and sweet potatoes.

CONFETTI CABBAGE SALAD (our favorite appetizer to hold us over until dinner is ready)
2 cups shredded cabbage
2 large carrots, shredded
1 medium red pepper, chopped
1 onion, finely diced
2 T parsley, chopped
1/2 cup raisins (soaked in 2 cups hot water then drained)
Combine the above ingredients in a large bowl, and then dress with the dressing below. You could also garnish with 1/2 cup roasted peanuts or sunflower seeds
DRESSING: Whisk until blended:
2 t red wine vinegar
3 T olive oil
1 t salt
fresh ground black pepper to taste

Roasted Autumn Trio
Brussels Sprouts-stems trimmed off
White Turnips-remove tops for another use, cut into roots into pieces, same size as Brussels sprouts
Sweet Potatoes –leave skins on, cut into pieces, same size as Brussels sprouts
Use even amounts of each vegetable, beginning with 1-2 Cups of each. The colors of this side dish are very appealing. Place all in a large bowl. Sprinkle with 1/2 to 1 t salt and 1/4 t black pepper. Pour over the veggies: 2 T olive oil. Toss till all veggies are coated with the oil.
Lay out in a casserole dish 9' x 13' or a cookie sheet. Bake at 350 degrees for about one hour

Broccoli and Carrots -Cheesy Style
Break several heads of broccoli into small florets. Thinly slice 3 carrots. Place both in a steamer and steam until broccoli is bright green and carrots tender. Make a cheesy cream sauce: melt 3 T butter in a heavy saucepan, whisk in the 4 T flour, 1/2 t salt, and 1/4 t pepper; then add 2 C milk slowly. Whisk over high heat until it thickens, then stir in 2 C cheddar cheese. Pour over steamed veggies. Kids seem to love this, try it!

Mashed Japanese White Turnips Submitted by Sherra Zavitsanos
4 cups turnips, washed and cut into similar size cubes
Ground Fenugreek-1 1/2 teaspoons
Bay leaves -2 or 3
2 garlic cloves, peeled and sliced
sea salt (about 1 teaspoon)
pepper (to taste, optional)
butter (tablespoon)
Clean turnips, trim off any brown spots, and cut into about 2 inch cubes
Put in 2 quart saucepan and cover with water.
Add fenugreek, bay leaves, garlic, salt and pepper.
Bring to boil over high heat, then turn to medium heat, and boil until turnips are very soft. This will take about 30 minutes. Watch to prevent pot from boiling dry, but you do want to boil off most of the water, allowing the seasonings to remain. Remove from heat, and carefully pour off excess water, but do not allow seasonings to go down the drain. Mash with fork or potato masher for chunky texture. Remove bay leaves, add butter. If a smoother texture is desired, you can whip the turnips with a mixer and add a bit of milk. Makes about four servings.

Butternut Squash Casserole
1 pkg. couscous
1 butternut squash, peeled and cut into cubes
Butter, brown sugar
Cinnamon, nutmeg
Parmesan cheese, shredded
Cook the couscous using the directions on the package. Line the bottom of a greased 9 x 12 casserole with the couscous. Boil the squash in water until soft. Drain. Mash the squash. Mix in butter, brown sugar, cinnamon, and nutmeg to taste. Pour on top of couscous. Sprinkle the top with parmesan cheese. Bake at 350 for 30-40 minutes.

Napa Cabbage Stir Fry
1 lb. ground Beef
3 cloves garlic, sliced
1 C chopped onion
2 T sesame oil
2 C chopped Carrots
1 C turnip greens, chopped
1/2 or whole head Napa Cabbage, sliced thin, use the ribs also
1 t salt
1 Can organic coconut milk blended with Thai peanut sauce or -1-1/12 C stir fry sauce
1 lb package of wide Thai rice noodles, cooked
Brown the ground beef in a large pot. Add the carrots, garlic, onions. Stir often over medium heat. When carrots are soft, add the cabbage and salt. Stir often until cabbage is completely wilted down. Add sauce. Serve hot over rice noodles. If you like spicy, use Red Curry paste with coconut milk, instead of peanut sauce.

Maryland Markets: Silver Spring and Bethesda

Weekend CSA Thanksgiving Share:

For Saturday and Sunday deliveries to Silver Spring and Bethesda Farmer's Markets

Sweet Potatoes
Carrots
Broccoli
Butternut Squash
Japanese White Turnips
Onions
Tuscan Kale
Garlic
Red Cabbage
Bok Choy

Week of Novmeber 14th

Projected CSA menu:

Sweet Potatoes
Store at room temperature

Carrots
Store in the fridge

Broccoli
Store in an opened bag in the fridge

Red Cabbage
Store in the fridge

Garlic
Store at room temperature

Bok Choy
Store in a sealed bag in the fridge

Tuscan Kale
Store in a sealed bag in the fridge

Onions
Do not need to be refrigerated

Japanese White Turnips
Remove edible greens and store both separately in the fridge in bags

Acorn Squash
Store at room temperature

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Next Week: All deliveries will be made a day early to ensure that all our CSA members receive their bounty before the holiday! There will be NO THURSDAY delivery. All unclaimed shares are automatically donated.

A super moon November to remember! Cold and frosty mornings burning off into sunny, very warm, afternoons; the best weather recipe for growing fall broccoli. We were at peak season in mid-October, harvesting broccoli multiple times a week. Each harvest gives us about 2 weeks' worth of CSA and market broccoli to distribute and luckily it holds well in our cooler for up for 3 weeks at a time. Now, nearing Thanksgiving, our yields have been slowing down to about once every 10 days. Each broccoli plant gives us one head of broccoli, so one cut and it's done. Still, we have been moving from field to field, basking in the sun and bringing in tons of delicious crowns. Our long-awaited carrots are fresh out of the ground and just in time for the holiday next week. We waited long and patiently to harvest them this year since we know a good hard frost will make for even better tasting carrots. Wondering why we do not grow more carrots throughout the year? Although they are a staple veggie in many households, carrots are extremely difficult to cultivate and even more so if you are an organic grower. They require a lot of tedious care, hand weeding, and labor that we cannot afford in the heat of summer when there are so many other crops to tend to on our diverse farm. None of us like to visit the grocery store for vegetables during the CSA season, but carrots seem to be one of my only stops in the produce section of the store. The reality is, most carrots you buy in a grocery store are coming from a farm (most likely in California) that grows only and explicitly carrots. That is their only means of production and they have perfected it to an agricultural science on thousands of acres of carrots. We are amazed and challenged by what it takes to grow them and we will continue to experiment with carrots until they are successful or no longer sustainable in our farming model. Doing a winter externship on a carrot farm in California is looking pretty good right about now! Until then, enjoy your locally grown organic carrots and savor their minty aroma flavor while they are here. Also, do not peel carrots – for mindless waste and your own health!

Khaya's Korner: Thanksgiving

When I think of Thanksgiving, I think of a plump turkey. That's what my family has every year. Also, our table is filled with: yams, cranberry sauce, corn, and pigs in a blanket. For dessert, we have pies. Apple pies, pumpkin pies, cherry pies, and finally: crème pies. We usually go up to Maine to visit our relatives for Thanksgiving. Last year, they came up to Pennsylvania because my sister had just been born. But, regardless of where we are, we still have a lot of fun. So this year, just have an awesome time at your family's Thanksgiving dinner. ~ Khaya

Acorn Squash with Pasta
6 slices bacon
1 acorn squash- peeled, seeded, and diced (4 to 5 cups)
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 1/2 cups chicken broth
1 teaspoon kosher salt
4 oz. soft goat cheese crumbled. (Or your favorite soft cheese)
1 pound package linguine, cooked
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper
Cook the bacon in a large skillet over medium heat until crisp, about 5 min. Drain on paper towel, then crumble or break into pieces: set aside. Drain all but about 2 tablespoons of the bacon fat from the skillet. Add the squash and garlic to the skillet and sauté' over med. heat for 3 to 5 min. Stir in the broth and salt. Cover and simmer, stirring occasionally until the squash is cooked through and softened, 20 to 25 min... Add half the goat cheese and stir well to combine. Place the cooked Linguine in a bowl. Stir the sauce into the linguine and toss well to coat. Drizzle with the olive oil and add reserved bacon, the remaining goat cheese, and the pepper. Serve immediately.

Cabbage Blush from member Karen Kline
Red Cabbage
Honey Dijon Mustard
Blue Cheese
Directions: Slice Red Cabbage to a medium slaw
Add to boiling water
Cook as per blanching
You don't want to lose too much of the bright red color but cabbage should be semi soft
Drain well
Turn to bowls and add Honey Dijon dressing until thoroughly coated
Add a good mild creamy blue cheese for the topping to taste

French Braised Turnips and Carrots
5 carrots, cut into 1/2 inch slices
3 turnips, cut into 1/2 inch slices
2 C chicken or vegetable stock
2 t sugar
2 T butter
Salt and pepper to taste
Place carrots and turnips in a large, heavy saucepan with all other ingredients. Cook them, partially covered over medium heat until tender, about 20 minutes. Sprinkle with favorite herb(s) and serve in a warmed dish. 4-6 servings

Sweet Potato Pie
3-4 med. Sweet potatoes or yams (1 and 1/4 - 1 and 1/2 lbs)
1/3 C. softened butter, 1 / 3 C. sugar, 1 / 3 C. Brown Sugar, 1 / 2 tsp. Salt
1 / 4 tsp nutmeg, 2 eggs, beaten, 1 tsp vanilla, 2 / 3 C. milk, 1 unbaked 9" pie crust
Boil Sweet Potatoes until tender. Cool slightly-peel & mash (about 2 cups). Combine ingredients until creamy. Bake at 350 in oven for 50-60 minutes.
Cool to room temperature before serving. Store in refrigerator

Week of November 8th

This week's projected CSA menu:

Nicola Gold Potatoes
Italian Parsley
Bok Choy
Mixed Lettuce Greens
Acorn Squash (Full Share)
Spaghetti Squash (Medium Share)
Onions
Broccoli
Tuscan Kale
Green Cabbage
Cauliflower (Full Share Only)

Thanksgiving Week Only: All central PA deliveries will be made a day early to ensure that all our CSA members receive their bounty before the holiday on Thursday.

If you are traveling for the holiday and would like to switch your pickup site, simply send us an email request by Friday the 18th. To see other pickup options, please visit our website. There will be no Thursday delivery that week!

I am so thankful for the time change. Setting up the stand at our farmer's market early Sunday morning felt like a breeze in the sunlight. It also seemed to bring out the crowds, early, of folks craving fall produce. Many people have been asking us if we are "done" farming now after the frost? No, we still have six weeks to go in our growing season. We are still shocked at how dry it has been without rain but our standard fall crops are still out there happily growing and are still to come like red cabbage and leeks. Root veggies like beets, radishes, and turnips can all survive frosts and temperatures below freezing. Herbs like parsley and all members of the cabbage family like bok choy and broccoli are still coming in from the fields. All bunching greens: kale, collards, and chard are all able to thrive in this type of cold weather. We will even keep some kale specifically growing to endure the winter and snow for kale raab in the spring. Any bagged baby salad greens you receive like spinach or mixed lettuce greens are coming from our unheated hoop houses where they are grown directly in the ground. The rest of the items in your share box are coming from our storage shed built to house long term vegetables. Sweet potatoes, onions, winter squash, garlic, and potatoes are all held here for up to 9 months successfully. Outdoor growing capabilities are slim in the first and last few weeks of our CSA season and this facility has been a huge help to our farm in providing a better variety of items in our share boxes when they need it the most! With this, we can also plan and seed many weeks' worth of each crop knowing it will last in storage. Growing and having enough onions stored to give out every week is a blessing to us all.

November is our month to plant garlic. Each year, we aim to plant garlic when the full moon is waning towards a new moon. Energetically, this is the best time to plant root crops due to biodynamic principals. Our crew has been spending time each day preparing garlic to seed by separating the individual cloves off the stems of each head of garlic. We will continue to strip and stockpile them until the full moon comes. If all goes well with the weather conditions, each clove will sprout into a garlic plant that will be covered with straw and then harvested next July. We will then store it and repeat!

It's the season for roasting vegetables. Potatoes, broccoli, cauliflower, turnips, onions... all tossed in olive oil with your favorite seasonings. Roasted acorn squash with sausage and apples. Warming up at lunch with a hearty cabbage soup or stir fry leftovers. Enjoy November's bounty~

Spaghetti Squash Au Gratin
1 spaghetti squash (2-3lbs) halved (lengthwise) & seeded
1 clove garlic (chopped)
2 Tbsp fresh Italian parsley (chopped)
1/2 tsp salt 1/4 tsp pepper
1 T butter, 1 C half and half or whole milk
1/2 C shredded mild Colby cheese 1 C shredded Asiago cheese
-Place squash, skin side up, on a baking sheet. Bake @ 350 until tender
-Run Tines of fork lengthwise over cut surface of squash to loosen spaghetti-like strands; scoop out strands. Drain any excess liquid. Set aside.
-Combine garlic, parsley, salt, pepper, milk, Colby and 2/3 cup Asiago cheese in small bowl. Fold into squash; place in shallow ovenproof casserole dish. Top with remaining cheese.
-Place mixture into a 2-quart shallow casserole dish & bake 20 minutes in a 450 oven until lightly browned

Moroccan-Style Stuffed Acorn Squash
1 tbsp brown sugar 1/2 cup garbanzo beans, drained
1 ½ tsp butter, melted 1/4 cup raisins
1 acorn squash, halved and seeded 1 tsp ground cumin
1 tbsp olive oil salt and pepper to taste
1 clove garlic, chopped 8oz chicken broth
1 stalks celery, chopped 1/2 cup uncooked couscous
1 carrots, chopped
Preheat oven to 350 degrees F
Arrange squash halves cut side down on a baking sheet. Bake 30 minutes, or until tender. Dissolve the sugar in the melted butter. Brush squash with the butter mixture, and keep squash warm while preparing the stuffing.
Heat the olive oil in a skillet over medium heat. Stir in the garlic, celery, and carrots, and cook 5 minutes. Mix in the garbanzo beans and raisins. Season with cumin, salt, and pepper, and continue to cook and stir until vegetables are tender. Pour the chicken broth into the skillet, and mix in the couscous. Cover skillet, and turn off heat. Allow couscous to absorb liquid for 5 minutes. Stuff squash halves with the skillet mixture to serve.

Grandma Bevy's Broccoli-Walnut Bake
3-4 cups of trimmed stalks and broccoli florets--steam till bright green
2 C milk 1 C chicken stock-—may substitute vegetable stock (see above)
1/2 C flour 1/2 C butter
2/3 C water 6 T Butter
8 oz stuffing mix or salad croutons, or 2 C bread cubes seasoned with parsley, sage, thyme, salt, pepper.
1 C walnuts chopped
Place steamed broccoli at bottom of buttered 9x13 glass dish. Sprinkle with walnuts. Make a cream sauce with stock, milk, butter, flour. Pour over broccoli. Heat water, add 6 T butter and your bread
(Either packaged or homemade.) Top with the moistened cubes, Bake at 350 for 40 minutes.

Enchiladas with Chard
1 Bunch of chard, washed, stemmed, leaves chopped
1 Large onion, diced 1 Clove garlic, minced
1 Jalapeño, seeded and minced 1x28 Ounce can of Enchilada Sauce
1 Cup sharp cheddar cheese (optional) 1 Tablespoon coconut oil
1 green onion, sliced 1 and 1/2 Cup black olives sliced
8 Corn tortillas Salt & Pepper to taste
Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Fill a large bowl with cold water and ice cubes to use as an ice bath. Fill a large pot full of water and bring to the boil. Cook the chard for 2 minutes, strain and submerge in the ice bath to stop the cooking process. In a large skillet, heat up the coconut oil and add the onion and garlic. Cook until translucent and then add the chard and minced jalapeño. Cook for an additional two minutes. In a small shallow saucepan, heat up the enchilada sauce. Start with one tortilla by submerging into the sauce and cook for 60 seconds. Using tongs gently remove the tortilla and place in a casserole dish, fill with the chard mixture, adding a small amount of cheese, if using. Roll the tortilla over leaving the seam on the bottom. Repeat until the dish is full. Top with the remaining sauce, green onions and black olives. Bake for 30 minutes at 350. Enjoy!

Baked Cabbage from Karena Kell
Cook 1 head of cabbage until soft and tender.
Make 1 cup of white sauce and cool - add 1 can of cream of celery
soup and mix well.
Grease baking dish and put in a layer of the cabbage. Add sauce and shredded cheese, and then repeat...Top with cheese and breadcrumbs.
Bake @ 350 for 1 hour.

November 1st

This week's projected CSA menu:

Sweet Potatoes
Butternut Squash
Bok Choy
Red Beets
Broccoli
Garlic
Baby Spinach
Onions
Cauliflower (Full Share only most likely)

Thanksgiving Week Only: All Central PA CSA deliveries will be made a day early that week to ensure that all our members receive their bounty before the holiday on Thursday.

If you are traveling for the holiday and need to switch your pickup site, simply send us an email request to csa@spiralpathfarm.com

This is what they call an Indian Summer at the start of November. These unexpected warm temperatures have been wonderful to work outdoors in with incredible sunrises and sunsets from the hills of the farm's view. More new fall favorites are coming in like this week's featured bok-choy, a Chinese cabbage that has been harvested for over 5 thousand years! Use the leaves and stalks together. They are mild in flavor and can be used in stir frying, braising, soups, or raw. They are rich in vitamin A and C. Do not wash until ready to use. Check out the simple stir-fry recipe on the back and throw in just about anything in your CSA share this week... broccoli, radishes, spinach, etc.

Just wait until you slice into a watermelon radish. This variety has become increasingly popular due to the sheer beauty of this root vegetable's insides! They are nature's reminder to not judge a living creature on its outward appearance. They do have a little spice "bite" in flavor compared to our French breakfast radishes. Shaved watermelon radishes on a sandwich has become a widespread trend across the county on many restaurant and food truck menus, adding color and elegancy to otherwise bland subs and salads.

Our fall sweet potato dig yielded major success with some weighing in at a whopping 7 lbs.! All sweet potatoes were harvested at once and put directly into a storage room where they are completely dried out/cured before we send them out to be enjoyed by you. Curing all types of potatoes is a part of the vegetable farming process. It ensures the storage and stability of potatoes for up to 9 months. We also aim to grow a lot of them since we can rely on their long-term storage capabilities throughout the winter and into our 2017 CSA season. Store your sweet potatoes at room temperature away from direct sunlight. Some of these "clunkers" could feed a small family for a few days. Do not be intimidated by size; our sweet potatoes can be cut and further used in chunks at a time from the same potato. We always recommend not peeling the skins, since they are the most nutritious and delicious part of the potato!

Butternut squash lovers: here is your first wave of this hearty winter squash. Comparatively, it will taste much like the butterkin we gave in October, with a more yellowish color and nutty flavor. Butternut makes great soup, desserts, or simply roasted squash. Enjoy ~

Khaya's Korner: Election Day

Wow! 2016 has been a crazy election year! While Donald Trump and Hilary Clinton face off on November 8th my middle school will be holding a mock election for young people. WE get to vote with ballot boxes and do rallies for our favorite candidate. It is very important that you vote. You are very lucky you have the right to vote, because in some countries women aren't allowed to vote. Many people who don't register to vote are leaving the people who do vote in charge. In this country women and men can vote, and let's not take that for granted. So, everyone get out and vote this year! ~ Khaya

Butternut Squash Curry Soup
Sauté for 15 minutes in a large stock pot on low heat:
4 T butter
1 C chopped yellow onion
4 t curry powder
Add: 2 medium butternut squash (about 3 lbs or 4 C chopped squash)
peel with a vegetable peeler, halve, remove seeds, chop OR to prepare squash another way: cut in half lengthwise, put face down on cookie sheet and bake at 350 degrees for about an hour or until very soft. Allow to cool. Remove and discard seeds. Scoop out pulp and add to the cooked apples/onions/chicken broth, as below& then puree entire stock pot in a food processor or blender
2 apples, peeled, cored, chopped
3 C chicken or vegetable stock
Bring to a boil, and then simmer on low heat for about 25 minutes. Pour soup through a strainer or colander, reserve liquid. Move solids to a food processor or blender and puree, adding 1 C reserved stock. Return puree to the pot, add more liquids to adjust consistency. Add 1 C apple juice (or may use the soup liquids) and salt and pepper to taste.
Serve with a garnish of peeled grated apple

Bok Choy Stir Fry from The Rosemary House in Mechanicsburg
Prepare the sauce and set aside:
1 Tbsp. low sodium soy sauce
1 tsp. brown sugar
1 tsp. rice vinegar
1/2 tsp. Chile sauce (optional)
Prepare the veggies:
Wash, cut, slice, chop whatever veggies you have on hand. We used yummy peppers, red onions, minced garlic, and Bok Choy (leaves and stems, separated). Lots of all of them!
Line a frying pan with a thin layer of water, steam/sauté the onions, peppers, and garlic until tender but still with a slight crunch. Add the Bok Choy stems and sauté until tender. Note: Add more water if it has evaporated away. Add the leaves and sauté until wilted. Add sauce, and stir-fry an additional minute. If desired, sprinkle with green onions or raw cashews. Serve over rice, or not. Enjoy!

Baked Sweet Potato Fries
Cut raw sweet potatoes into French fry sticks or cubed. Leave skins on. About 4 cups.
Toss with olive oil, 1/2 tsp. cumin, 1/2 tsp. salt in a large bowl.
Pour onto 1 or 2 baking sheets and spread in one layer.
Bake at 350 for one hour.
Or for crispier fries prepare sweet potatoes the same way, just set oven to 425 instead and bake fries for 15 minutes, then flip them, and bake for another 10-15 mins.

Creamy Sweet Potato & Cumin Soup
2 Tbsp. Oil
1 lg. Sweet onion sliced
2 tsp. Cumin
3 Sweet potatoes, peeled & Cubed
1 1/2 qt. Chicken broth
1 3/4 C. plain yogurt
2 Tbsp. parsley, chopped
1/4 C. toasted pumpkin seeds
Saute` onions & cumin with oil in soup pot. Add potatoes & chicken broth and bring to boil. Reduce heat & simmer 20-25 minutes.
Puree soup with 1 1/2 c. yogurt & parsley. Serve each portion with dollop of yogurt & sprinkle of pumpkin seeds.

October 24th

This Week's Projected CSA menu:

Acorn Squash
Store at room temperature

Kale
Store in a sealed bag in the fridge

Cauliflower
Store in an opened bag in the fridge

Shallots
Store at room temperature

Cabbage
Store in the fridge

Broccoli
Store in an opened bag in the fridge

San Marzano Plum Tomatoes
Store at room temperature

Green Pepper
store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Onions
Do not need to be refrigerated

The Last Tomato slicer of the season! (Full Share Only)
Do not refrigerate

Sweet Orange Mini Peppers (Full Share Only)
Store in the fridge

Broccoli season marches on! I know our family and farm crew is sure loving their annual fall dosage of this incredibly healthy vegetable. Eating with the season means soaking up on what you love (and need) while it's here. Broccoli is great for our digestive system, can help lower cholesterol, and is loaded with vitamin D, A, and K. The entire plant is edible: stem, leaves, and florets. Don't miss out on the sweet stems! I peel the thick outer layer of the stem and chop it down to size to match the florets so that they all have the same cook-time. New to cauliflower? So are we. It took us many years and failed-attempts to successfully grow nice looking crowns of cauliflower and, finally, this is our year! We typically can always get it to grow, but to produce all white flowers without any bug bites or brown markings on it by the time it is ready to be harvested in the fall has been nearly impossible for us as organic farmers. This is the first year we have produced enough to give to all our CSA members and we are confident that we have our growing methods down to offer it continuously in the future. Cauliflower is in the same family as broccoli and they can be mixed and cooked together in all the same ways. It is also the new trendy way to replace carbs in your diet. Cauliflower can be used to make a pizza crust, mashed potatoes, bagels, tots, alfredo sauce, fritters, and so much more.

Acorn squash is in the box this week. Like all winter squash, acorn is in the same family as cucumbers and melons! We grow the most common variety that is dark green, often with a single splotch of orange on the side. Their hard shells have distinctive longitudinal ridges that protects them from damage and can be stored up to 6 months in a warm dry area. They are indigenous to North and Central America and were introduced to Europeans by the Native Americas. They have one of the richest source of plant based anti-inflammatory nutrients like omega 3s and beta carotene which help support our immune system during the seasons we seem to need it the most! Most people cut the acorn squash in half lengthwise, scoop out the seeds, and then stuff the cavity with either sweet or savory ingredients. All winter squash is ready after baking for an hour at 360 degrees. Load it with your favorite herbs and toppings. See the simple recipes below~

Khaya's Korner: Moving

In a few weeks, my family and I will be moving to the farm. We already have some things over there, like Isla's toys, a piano keyboard, and all of our games, puzzles, and movies. Other things we must wait to move, like our beds, most of our furniture, and silverware. However, I am excited to move! I will be riding a different bus but going to the same school. Also, I am very happy because my mom just painted my room's walls a lavender color, and my room's trim a darker purple color. I have already packed up most of the contents of the bookshelf in my room, and downstairs we have packed boxes in our living room. We will now have our own pool and a big garden. I am so excited that we will be moving in a few weeks. Yay!
~ Khaya

Savory Cauliflower Skillet
1 large head of cauliflower, chopped into pieces about 1 T each (total of 6-8 Cups)
1/3 C butter
2 C chopped white or yellow onions
1/4 t pepper-1 t salt (use Himalayan or earth salt) -1 t dried thyme or 1/2 t fresh thyme
1-1/2 C grated sharp cheddar cheese
In a large heavy skillet, melt the butter and sauté onions until translucent, add the chopped cauliflower, salt and pepper. Cook on medium to high heat, stirring often, until onions are fully caramelized and the cauliflower is soft and cooked through -about 10-15 minutes.) Cauliflower can also begin to brown.
Add the thyme and cook 2 more minutes. Top with cheese, turn off the pan. Allow cheese to melt.
Serve -this delicious tender mix works as a nice topping for pasta, on its own as a side dish, as a veggie ingredient for cheesesteak sandwiches.

Russian Vegetable Pie from The Vegetarian Epicure, submitted by CSA member Alice Anne Schwab
Ingredients: 1 box of Pillsbury crusts - or your favorite savory crust.
1 small head of cabbage (about 3 cups)
1/2 lb. mushrooms
1 yellow onion
To taste: basil, marjoram, tarragon, salt/pepper
3 Tbsp butter
4 oz. cream cheese, softened
4-5 hard cooked eggs
Fresh Dill
Prepare a 9" pie pan with the bottom crust lain upon the pan.
Shred the cabbage coarsely. Wash and slice the mushrooms and peel and chop the onion.
In a large skillet, melt about 2 Tbsp butter. Add the onion and cabbage and sauté for several minutes, stirring constantly. Add Marjoram, Basil, and tarragon (dried/crushed) and some salt and pepper. Allow the mixture to cook until the cabbage wilts and the onions are soft. Remove the pan from the heat and set aside.
Add another Tbsp butter to the pan and sauté the mushrooms lightly for 5 minutes, stirring constantly.
Spread the softened cream cheese in the bottom of the pie shell. Slice the eggs and arrange the slices in a layer over the cream cheese. Sprinkle them with a little chopped dill, then cover with the cabbage. Make a final layer of the sautéed mushrooms, sprinkle on more dill and cover with the remaining circle of pastry.
Press the pastry together lightly at the edges and flute them. With a sharp knife, cut a few short slashes through the top crust.
Bake in a 400-degree oven for 15 minutes. Then turn the temperature down to 350 and continue banking for another 20- 25 minutes, or until the crust is light brown.
Let sit 5 minutes before cutting and serving.

ACORN SQUASH BOWLS
Slice Acorn squash in half lengthwise. Scoop out the seeds.
In the cavity place
1 T butter
1/4 t cinnamon,
2 T brown sugar,
2 T raisins,
2 T chopped nuts (walnuts are good.)
Cover with foil and place in a casserole dish. Add 1/4 C water to the bottom of casserole dish; this will help steam cook the squash. Cover and bake for one hour at 350 degrees.
A savory version would include salt, pepper, thyme, parsley, & rosemary, 1/2 T minced onion and garlic, a few croutons, and 2 T shredded cheese.
Be creative and include your own favorite seasonings and herbs.

October 17th

This week's tentative CSA share menu:

Broccoli
Store in a bag inside the fridge

Red Potatoes
Store in a cool dark cabinet

Japanese White Turnips
Store tops and roots separately in the fridge

White Onions
Store on a countertop

French Breakfast Radishes
Cut the tops and store separately in a sealed bag in the fridge

San Marzano Plum Tomatoes
Store at room temperature

Green Peppers
store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Red Onions
Store on a countertop

Sweet Orange Snack Pepper
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Spaghetti Squash (Full Share only)
Store at room temperature

Red Ripened Tomato (Full Share)
Do not refrigerate

Cauliflower (Medium Share Only)
Store in an opened bag in the fridge

The usual up and down temperatures of October are upon us. Last week, we woke up to our first frost of the season. It was just a light coverage so nothing too damaging to our pepper and tomato plants that have been winding down for the year. As for our fall crops; they love the cold weather. Broccoli begins to taste sweeter after the first frost, kale and collard leaves become tastier, and the leeks are growing! Some veggies we specifically wait to harvest until after the first hard frosts, just for taste, like carrots and Brussel Sprouts. More root vegetables are beginning to come in like our Japanese white turnips this week. We love this variety of turnip for the flavor, texture, and size. You will find the Japanese turnip to be very sweet and juicy. There is no need to peel them and they have so many ways to be prepared and enjoyed. Turnips are simply delicious when shredded raw right onto a salad with a cheese grater. They can be roasted, sautéed, boiled, mashed, etc. Dice and pair them on a baking sheet with the red potatoes for a wonderful autumn roast in the oven. You can use the entire turnip plant as well. The greens are totally edible and go great in soup or simply sautéed with olive oil and onions.

We have 8 weeks left of CSA deliveries in the year! A lot of our packing house work has been slowing down. We are still growing and receiving just as much produce as before but the fall crops require much less grading and cleaning than summer produce. For example: all of the bunching greens, like kale and chard, are harvested and bundled directly in the fields and that is the only contact we have with them before you receive it. Most fall produce does not (should not) get washed before we pack it like broccoli or cauliflower. All winter squash is naturally hearty with a thick skin for the weather and long-term keeping and do not need to be handled with such care like tomatoes or melons. This also means that there is a lot less grading involved since insects and other animals have a tough time getting past it to the edible interior. Many things are ready "as is" like cabbage and spaghetti squash. That leaves us with root veggies and all of the baby salad greens. We do clean off all of our root veggies so that you do not receive them caked in nice organic mud. So, every morning our crew is outside, suited up for the weather in boots and huge waterproof aprons. Everyone is equipped with a strong sprayer hose and we go at it. A warm sunny morning is always appreciated!

Coming Soon: Bok Choy, Sweet Potatoes, Carrots, Acorn Squash, & plenty more!

Khaya's Korner: Fall Newsletter

Hi, everyone. I love fall. Fall is the time where the leaves turn pretty colors and fall of the trees. They are a lot of work to rake up, but they are beautiful! Also, there is squash, turnips, bunching greens, and sweet potatoes. I love making a steaming hot pumpkin pie with butternut squash. Bunching greens like kale taste delicious as crispy, crunchy kale chips. I love sweet potatoes hot with butter! What is your favorite fall special to make? ~ Khaya

Loaded Broccoli Cheese and Bacon Soup
3 cups Low Sodium Chicken Broth
1 cup Peeled and Chopped Carrots, Diced Small
1 cup Chopped Celery, Diced Small
3 cups Peeled and Chopped Potatoes, Diced Small
1/2 cups Finely Chopped Onion
5 cups Broccoli Crowns, Diced Small (about 2 Heads of Broccoli)
5 strips Bacon, Chopped
2 Tablespoons Butter
1/3 cups Flour
3 cups Milk
4 cups Shredded Sharp Cheddar Cheese (about 16 Ounces)
1 teaspoon Salt
1/2 teaspoons Pepper
1 teaspoon Dried Mustard--optional
1. In a large saucepan, combine the chicken broth, carrots, celery, potatoes and onion. Bring the mixture to a boil, cover and simmer for 10 minutes, until the vegetables are starting to get tender.
2. Add the chopped broccoli. Cover and simmer for another 10 minutes. The pan is going to be very full of vegetables and it might seem like it isn't "soupy" enough since the vegetables overpower the broth but I promise it will all work out when you add the cheese mixture.
3. In a separate medium saucepan, sauté the bacon until golden and crisp. Remove the bacon to a paper towel-lined plate. Drain the grease and wipe out the saucepan. Keep the bacon fat and add 2 T butter.
4. Melt the butter with the bacon fat (in the same saucepan you cooked the bacon in) over medium heat. Whisk in the flour and cook for 1-2 minutes until golden, stirring constantly. Gradually whisk in the milk and cook until the mixture is bubbling and is slightly thickened, 5-7 minutes.
5. Stir in the cheddar cheese one handful at a time, adding another handful after the cheese that has been added has melted. Stir in the salt, pepper and dry mustard.
6. Slowly stir the cheese sauce into the hot broth and vegetables, whisking to combine well. Stir in the reserved bacon and add additional salt and pepper to taste, if needed. If you want the soup a bit thinner, stir in a little extra broth or milk a bit at a time until you get the consistency you are looking for.

Japanese Turnips with Miso (Braised) --- very tasty!!
3 tablespoons white miso
3 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened, divided
3 pounds small (1 1/2-to 2-inch) Japanese turnips with greens
1 1/3 cups water
2 tablespoons mirin (Japanese sweet rice wine) [or any other sweetened alcohol]
Stir together miso and 2 tablespoon butter. Discard turnip stems and coarsely chop leaves. Halve turnips (leave whole if tiny) [ cut into 1inch cubes] and put in a 12-inch heavy skillet along with water, mirin, remaining tablespoon butter, and 1/8 teaspoon salt. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, then boil, covered, 10 minutes.
Add greens by handfuls, turning and stirring with tongs and adding more as volume in skillet reduces. Cover and cook 1 minute. Uncover and continue boiling, stirring occasionally, until turnips are tender and liquid is reduced to a glaze, about 5 minutes. Stir in miso butter and cook 1 minute. Serve with cooked rice topped with toasted sesame seeds

Caramelized Turnips
3 cups diced peeled turnips, 1/4 cup water, 1 cube chicken bouillon
1 tablespoon butter, or more as needed
2 tablespoons white sugar
Place the turnips into a skillet with the water and chicken bouillon cube over medium heat, and simmer until the water has evaporated and the turnips are tender, about 15 minutes. Stir in the butter, let melt, and sprinkle on the sugar. Gently cook and stir the turnips until the butter and sugar cook into a brown, sticky coating on the turnips, about 10 minutes. Serve hot.

October 10

This week's projected CSA menu:

Broccoli
Store in a bag inside the fridge

Cabbage
Store in a bag in the fridge

French Breakfast Radishes
Cut the tops and store separately in a sealed bag in the fridge

Onions
Store on a countertop

Butterkin Squash
Store at room temperature

San Marzano Plum Tomatoes
Store at room temperature

Green Peppers
store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Red Onion
Store on a countertop

Sweet Orange Snack Peppers
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Red Ripened Tomato (Full Share)
Do not refrigerate

Cauliflower (Full Share)
Store in a bag inside the fridge

Holy Macro-bins of cabbage!

We did a massive harvest of our fall cabbage last week that yielded a total of 46 macro bins of beautiful green heads. We typically aim to grow 12-16 bins worth but this year it grew so successfully that we barely had any bad heads graded out in the fields. Not to mention, the heads are huge, with some weighing in at 6 lbs.! Cabbage stores for a long time in the fridge and we will use this harvest to distribute to our CSA members for the rest of our season into December. You can easily slice your cabbage in half and store in a sealed bag to use for later in the week/month. If the outer leaves begin to turn, simply peel off and underneath will be perfectly green crisp cabbage to use. Cabbage is a staple plant that is used in many different ways across the globe. Raw shredded salads, stir-fried, baked, soups, relish; cabbage can be incorporated into any dish and goes well with any type of cuisine. Raw cabbage can also easily be chopped and stored in bags in the freezer without blanching.

October signals many of us to crave pumpkin foods and our butterkin squash is in... right on schedule. A butterkin is a cross between a pie pumpkin and butternut squash. Their insides are dark orange, sweet, smooth, and ridiculously tasty. Each butterkin will make at least 1 pie, soup, or simply roasted winter squash. To cook a butterkin, cut in half down from the stem and scoop out the seeds and pulp making an empty cavity. Lay face down on a roasted sheet and bake for 1 hour at 350 degrees. Once it is cooked, the skin will easily peel off for you to discard. All that's left is wonderfully smelling, steaming hot squash to blend or puree into your recipe. We will have plenty more butterkins and butternut squash on their way to you for the rest of the year. They store up to 8 months at room temperature so get ready for our favorite variety of pumpkin. You can also freeze pureed pumpkin – so now is the time to start getting your freezers full for winter!

Broccoli, the fall favorite, is now ready and due to come in for several weeks. We grow a lot of it and are thrilled with the size of crowns coming in from the fields. We use/eat the entire plant: stems, greens, and florets. Most people toss the stem, but if you take the time to cut off the tough exterior, you'll discover a crunchy, deliciously tender inside. If you're serving the broccoli raw, you can crisp it by soaking it in cold water for about 10 minutes. To steam broccoli: bring about 1/4 inch of water to a boil in a large frying pan. Add about 1/2 tsp. of salt and broccoli. Cover and steam until as tender as you like (about 3 minutes for crisp-tender and up to 8 minutes for completely cooked, soft florets). Store broccoli, unwashed, in an open plastic bag in the refrigerator. Broccoli will keep up to 10 days in the refrigerator.

Khaya's Korner: Halloween

Fall is here! This means Halloween is coming soon, and our vegetables are ready for harvest. Last week we had a massive cabbage harvest, and hope you look forward to using it in a multitude of ways. I love carving squash or pumpkins into jack 'o' lanterns. In school we used to dress up scarecrows, but I doubt that will happen this year, since I am in middle school. It is still fun to go trick or treating with my friends from school whose younger siblings are friends with my younger siblings. Also, this is my sister's 2nd Halloween, and I am very excited to be able to celebrate it with her. Of course, our school throws a big Halloween party, and that is always fun too.

 Basic Pumpkin Pie Filling for (1) 9" pie
3/4 C brown sugar 2 eggs
1/2 t cinnamon 3/4 C evaporated milk or half and half
1/2 t nutmeg 2 t melted butter
1/4 t ginger 1/4 t salt
1-1/2 C mashed pumpkin
Blend together and pour into 9"unbaked crust. Bake at 350 for about 45 minutes or until custard rises and a toothpick comes out clean.

Grandma's Hamburger (or sausage) and cooked cabbage.
In a large skillet brown 1-2 lbs. hamburger or loose sausage and
1 onion, chopped coarsely
When browned, add several hands full of sliced cabbage,
salt and pepper to taste
Put about 1/2 cup water or beef broth in the pan, and cover until the cabbage is steamed and the liquid nearly gone.
In spite of its simplicity, this dish is really tasty.

Pumpkin Sheet Cake
Blend together: 2 C of cooked pumpkin or butternut squash
1 C oil (or 1 / 2 C canola & 1 / 4 C coconut oil & 1 / 4 C applesauce)
1-1 / 2 C Sugar
4 Eggs
Add and blend:
2 C flour
1 t baking soda
2 t baking powder
2 t cinnamon
1 / 2 t salt
1 C chopped walnuts (optional)
Butter a cookie sheet and spread batter evenly. Bake at 350 degrees for about 20-25 minutes or until done (toothpick inserted comes out clean) Cool the cake and then frost
Cream Cheese Frosting:
Blend together and whip with mixer till fluffy and spread over cooled cake
1 / 2 stick butter ( 4 T )
8oz pkg cream cheese
1 and 1 / 2 C 10x sugar
1 / 8 to 1 / 4 C milk
2 T yogurt or 1 T milk

Cabbage Au Gratin Submitted by member Susie Stum
1 medium head of cabbage, 1 pint of white sauce (below), 3/4 cup shredded cheddar cheese
salt, paprika, 3 Tbsp melted butter, 1-2 cups torn bread pieces, 1/8 tsp garlic powder
Coarsely chop cabbage, removing the core and cook to desired tenderness in salted (if desired) water
(5-8 minutes). Layer 1/2 of the cabbage into a buttered 9x13 baking dish. Sprinkle with 1/2 of the
cheese and sprinkle with paprika. Cover with 1/2 white sauce. Repeat the layers. Mix butter and garlic powder. Add bread crumbs and sprinkle on top. Bake @ 350 for approximately 30 minutes.
White Sauce: 4 Tbsp butter, 4 Tbsp flour, 2 cups milk, 1/2 tsp salt, 1/4 tsp black pepper
Melt butter in skillet or saucepan. Mix in flour and cook until it bubbles. Slowly add milk and bring to a boil stirring constantly until mixture thickens. Add salt and pepper. "Even if you really don't like cabbage, you need to try this. Kids love it.

October 3

This week's projected CSA menu:

Mixed Lettuce Greens
French Breakfast Radishes
Garlic
San Marzano Plum Tomatoes
Green Peppers
Kale
Orange Snack Peppers
Onions
Yellow Pepper
Red Ripened Tomato- Med Share
Heirloom Tomato - Full Share
Delicata Squash - Full Share
Eggplant - Full Share

Many different jobs are underway at the start of our fall season. Although we still have many new cold season items to come, many of our pepper and tomato fields are coming to an end. Which means major field cleanups of all the plants, stakes, string, irrigation, etc. The sooner we can get a field cleaned out, the closer we are to getting cover crops into the ground. Cover crops are one of the fundamental farming methods responsible for our nutrient rich soil at Spiral Path. Cover crops are what farmers plant in finished fields during the off-season to protect the ground from erosion and provide a root system that is beneficial to the soil that surrounds it. Different types of cover crops actually bring nutrients to the surface that we will then till and plant directly into next season with our spring crops. This keeps our soil filled with nutrients that will boost the health of our future crops. We plant different mixtures of peas, oats, vetch, and rye that will survive throughout the winter and into next March when the ground thaws. Even our PYO flower garden was immediately pulled out, tilled, and seeded with peas and oats as soon as the last Open Farm Day was over. All plants deserve extra love and care for the ecosystem that surrounds them! It means all the difference in flavor (in our opinion) and nutrient density. Pulling plants and removing irrigation can be quite the dirty job – especially after a week of what seemed like the whole summer's worth of rain. We are thankful for the colder weather in the 60s and low 70s. Each morning provides a breathtaking view from any part of the farm. Watching the low fog burn off from the bright sun makes for an easy Monday morning in the mud.

We hope you enjoyed the first round of red potatoes with plenty more to come next week and still fields of gold potatoes still to come in. There is no need to peel the skins off since they are the most flavorful and nutritious part of the potato...you can practically taste the earth! Potatoes store best in a paper bag in a cool dark place like in the cabinet under the sink. They need to be kept far from moisture as well as onions! Despite both of their need to be kept at room temperature, potatoes and onions do not mix well when stored together in the same vicinity. Both vegetables are alive and well but do not like to breathe the same air... just a little farmer's tip.

Khaya's Korner: County Fair

Hi. This year I took Basketry 2 as my only project for 4- H. Just last week I got my 4-H results back from the County Fair. The County Fair was in August, but all of the projects over the county have to be picked up by the club leader. Then, people have to pick their projects at the leader's house or the next meeting. I wove two baskets this year, a market basket, and a picnic basket. I got 1st prize on both baskets. I got to see the scores at the County Fair, where they have a big building dedicated just to 4- H projects. I am very happy with my scores, and I am glad I waited so long to be able to see them. 4-H is a very fun club, but it is also hard work. It took me two days to be able to make the baskets. ~ Khaya

Stuffed Delicata Squash with Chicken Sausage-Mushroom Stuffing from CSA member Andrea Jack
3 small delicata squash (about 16 ounces each), halved and seeded
olive oil spray
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
14 oz sweet Italian chicken sausage
3/4 cup chopped onion
3/4 cup chopped celery
4 oz chopped fresh shiitake mushrooms
1 sprig fresh thyme
6 tbsp shredded parmesan cheese
chopped parsley, for garnish
Preheat oven to 425°F. Spray the cut sides of the squash with oil and sprinkle with salt. Place face down on a large baking sheet. Bake until tender and browned on the edges, about 20 to 25 minutes. Meanwhile, in a large saute pan cook sausage on medium heat, breaking up the meat into small pieces as it cooks until the sausage is cooked through and is browned. Add the oil, onion and celery; cook until celery is soft, about 8 to 10 minutes. Add the mushrooms and thyme to the pan, more salt and pepper if needed and cook, stirring 5 minutes, then cook covered for 2 minutes, or until the mushrooms are soft and cooked through. Divide (1/2 cup) between the squash, top with parmesan cheese and bake 10 minutes.

Hearty Portuguese Kale Soup (very rich and hearty) By CSA member Katharine Bennett
1 T. olive oil
1/2 lb. smoked sausage sliced 1/2" thick
1 Qt. chicken broth
1 med. onion, thinly sliced
3 med potatoes, sliced
1 lg bunch kale (about 1 lb), shredded or sliced very thin
Salt and fresh ground pepper.
Heat oil in a skillet and sauté the sausage just until the fat is rendered, about 3-5 minutes. Drain on paper towels and reserve. Bring broth to a boil with the onions and potatoes; simmer 10-15 min. until potatoes are very tender. Mash onions and potatoes in the broth with a potato masher or slotted spoon. Add drained sausage slices and the kale. Bring to a boil and then simmer for 3-5 minutes, until kale is tender. Taste for seasoning - add salt and pepper as needed and serve

Roasted Radish Salad
1 and 1/2 lbs. radishes (any kind or a mixture)
3 Tbls. olive oil
1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
1 tsp. sugar-free dijon mustard (or sugar-free yellow mustard)
2 Tbls. chopped fresh parsley
2 Tbls. chopped fresh dill
3 green onions, thinly sliced
1/2 lemon, juiced
Pinch stevia or xylitol, to taste and Salt/pepper to taste
Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Preheat a large baking sheet.
Trim radishes. Slice larger radishes in half. In a large bowl, toss radishes with 2 Tbls. of the oil. Spread on the preheated baking sheet and roast for 30 minutes, stirring once. You want the radishes tender and beginning to brown, but not mushy, so check them at about 25 minutes.
Meanwhile, combine the remaining 1 Tbls. of oil with the herbs, mustard, vinegar, green onions and lemon. When radishes are done, allow to cool slightly, then toss with vinaigrette. Add sea salt, fresh pepper and stevia to taste. Serve warm or refrigerate and serve chilled.

September 26 Last week of Summer Shares

This week's projected CSA menu:

Red Potatoes
Store in a cool dark place

Spaghetti Squash
Store on a countertop

Green Peppers
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Onions
Store on a countertop

Heirloom Tomato
Store on a countertop

Fresh Oregano or Sage
Store in the fridge

San Marzano Plum Tomatoes
Store at room temperature

Tuscan Kale
Store in a sealed bag in the fridge

Yellow Pepper (Full Share Only)
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Red Ripe Tomato
Store at room temperature

Sweet Orange Snack Peppers
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Radishes
Cut the tops and store separately in a sealed bag

Please return all of our CSA boxes to your pickup site so that we can recycle them back into the weekly deliveries!

Central PA Summer Shares: This is your last CSA delivery

Extend your membership for any amount of time until December *pro-rated
We still have 11 weeks left of produce coming from the fields! Email us your request to continue your CSA share deliveries and we will send you back a confirmation.

How do I use a spaghetti squash?

All of our spaghetti squash is ripe and ready to use. They store for an incredible amount of time at room temperature, as do most winter squash, naturally for us to use into the winter time. Spaghetti squash, as its name suggests, can be a substitute for pasta. Once the squash is cooked, you can easily run a fork over the surface to loosen spaghetti-like strands of hearty squash. There are many ways to prepare a spaghetti squash:
First, pierce the squash several times with a sharp knife. (Do this especially if you're microwaving it, or you may end up with a "Squash Explosion!")

To microwave squash, cut in half and seed. Place 1/4-inch water in a microwave safe dish. Place squash in dish, cut sides down -- sides will overlap. Cover with plastic wrap and microwave on high power 13 minutes. Reserve 1/2 cup liquid in a bowl.

To boil squash: cut in half and scrape out seeds. Boil squash until tender, 15 to 20 minutes. Place 1/2 cup cooking water into a bowl, then drain and shred the squash. Transfer to a bowl with reserved liquid.

To roast: cut in half lengthwise. Coat inside with olive oil. Place face down on baking sheet. Bake at 400 degrees for one hour. Allow to cool.

Slow Cooker/Crock Pot: Put it in with a cup of water and let it go on low all day (8 to 10 hours).
-When done, cut open "at the equator" (not lengthwise).

Remove the seeds and pulp (I use tongs and an oven mitt -- it is HOT) and separate strands by running the tines of the fork lengthwise to "create" the spaghetti pasta. Drain any excess liquid and set aside.
-Serve with a topping of any sort: tomato sauce and cheese, simply butter salt and pepper.

Khaya's Korner: Tomatoes

This year, the different types of tomatoes we're growing include: heirloom tomatoes, plum tomatoes, grape tomatoes, and red round tomatoes. Why are there so many different kinds of tomatoes? The answer: you can use tomatoes for lots of different things. Heirlooms can be used for pretty much everything because they are so flavorful. Plums are normally used for tomato sauce and fresh salsa because they are so meaty. Grapes are normally used for salads or snacking. Red round tomatoes, or beefsteak tomatoes, are used for sandwiches. Tomatoes are an all-time favorite for everybody. I don't particularly love raw tomatoes, but I sure do love them in other things!

Herbed Spaghetti Squash
1 small spaghetti squash
2 and 1/2 tablespoons butter
2 and 1/2 tablespoons finely chopped mixed soft herbs, such as basil, chives, oregano, parsley and sage
1/2 teaspoon salt, 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
Directions:
Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.
Using a sharp knife, cut the squash in half lengthwise and place, cut side down, in a baking dish. Add enough water to come 1/2-inch up the sides of the baking dish and cover with aluminum foil. Bake for 45 minutes, until the squash is easily pierced with a paring knife. Turn squash over and cover with foil again and continue to cook another 15 minutes, until the squash is very tender. Remove from the oven, uncover, and allow to cool slightly. Using a spoon, remove the seeds and discard (or toast the seeds). Using a fork, gently pull the strands of squash away from the peel and place the squash strands into a mixing bowl. Heat a skillet. Add the butter, spaghetti squash, herbs, salt and pepper and toss thoroughly but gently to heat and combine. Serve immediately or cover and keep warm until ready to serve.

Grilled Potatoes and Peppers
8 medium red potatoes, cut into wedges
2 medium green peppers, sliced
1 medium onion, cut into thin wedges
2 tbsp. olive oil
5 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
1 tsp. paprika
1 tsp. Montreal steak seasoning
1 tsp. Italian seasoning
1/4 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. pepper
In a large bowl, combine all ingredients. Divide between two pieces of heavy duty foil (about 18 in. square). Fold foil around potato mixture and crimp edges to seal.
Grill, covered, over medium heat 40-45 minutes or until potatoes are tender. Open foil carefully to allow steam to escape.

Tuscan Garbanzo Bean & Kale
1 / 4 cup Olive oil 3 bay leaves
1 cup diced carrots, celery, and onions 1 tsp ground coriander seed
4 cloves peeled garlic, chopped 1 tsp salt
3 cans (15.5 oz) Garbanzo Beans, drained, rinsed 1 / 2 tsp fresh cracked pepper
1 can diced tomatoes 3 cups seasoned tomato sauce
1 tsp crushed red pepper 3 and 1 / 2 cups water
1 tsp dried thyme leaves 2 cups kale greens, chopped
1 / 4 cup melted butter Shredded parmesan cheese
Heat olive oil in stockpot on medium. Add carrots, celery, and onions. Cook, stirring, about 6 min, until veggies begin to soften. Add garlic; cook 1 min. Add garbanzo beans; stir. Add diced tomatoes with juice, crushed red pepper, thyme, bay leaves, coriander, salt, and pepper. Cook 2 min. Add seasoned tomato sauce and water. Bring to simmer on high. Reduce heat to medium-low; cook, stirring occasionally, 20 min. Add kale. Cook, stirring occasionally, 10 min. Add melted butter; stir. Cook 2 min. Remove bay leaves. Sprinkle each serving with shredded cheese.

September 19

This week's *projected CSA menu:

Kale
Shallots
Yellow Bell Peppers
San Marzano Plum Tomatoes
Thyme (Full Share)
Mixed Greens
Yellow Onions
Heirloom Tomatoes
Orange Snack Peppers
Eggplant
Green Pepper
Red Ripened Tomatoes

Summer Shares: your last delivery is approaching!

Extend your membership for any amount of time until December *pro-rated
Email us your request and we can send you back a confirmation letter and an easy link to further your support of our farm. Your share cost will instantly drop with your commitment!

Please return all of our CSA boxes to your pickup site so that we can recycle them back into the weekly deliveries!

Finally, the farm received rain!

7 tenths of an inch came overnight Sunday into Monday to truly save us and the struggling farms nearby. This is the driest year my parents have ever experienced in their 40 years on the farm... 40 years! Western Perry County and many other parts of the state have been facing a tough summer for growing and maintaining crops of all kinds. Our neighboring farms are barely producing corn for their animals, the trees are browning and dropping leaves earlier than ever, and our lilacs are wilted. The old farmer saying goes "if you get the first thunderstorms of the year, your luck is in line to receive them all summer." Spiral Path has not had that luck. Rain has poured in places all around us, but not here. We have watched several storms go by in distant ridgelines, but never reach our farm. It's hard not to take it personal as people who are totally reliant on cooperative weather. Needless to say, the rain was a sure blessing and a huge wave of relief for us. Finally, we were able to safely plant cover crops in our finished fields. Once again, our hearts go out to the local farmers who have experienced exponential loss from the drought; whether it be the overstock of milk currently in Harrisburg or the lack of irrigation methods for feeder crops. We really are in a humbling time of extreme weather.
The peppers sure are growing though! They seem unaffected and are coming in heavy this year and we hope the pepper lovers aren't losing their steam in finding ways to associate them into every meal. That's simply the way it is in August and September.

Soon-to-come:
Potatoes, spaghetti squash, baby spinach, red bell peppers, acorn squash, broccoli

Khaya's Korner: Our Garden

My brother Jonas and I have a garden at the farm, and right now it's looking very pretty. My grandma, Terra planted many of the flowers before we were even born, but we got a chance to pick some out. Terra suggested we choose perennials. Perennials are a group of flowers that grow back every year. That means you don't have to dig them up in the fall and plant them again in the spring. The kind of perennials we chose were lilies. Lilies bloom in many different colors such as: pink, purple, orange, red, and white. You name it, and it is probably a color of a lily we have. If you decide to plant your own flower garden, and you are having a tough time deciding which flowers to choose, go for perennials, more specifically: lilies. ~ Khaya

Swiss Chard with Garbanzo Beans
2 tablespoons olive oil-1 shallot, chopped, 1 onion, chopped-1 / 2 cup garbanzo beans, drained-
salt and pepper to taste-1 bunch red Swiss chard, rinsed and chopped-1 tomato, sliced- 1 / 2 lemon, juiced.
Heat olive oil in a large skillet. Stir in shallot and onions; cook and stir for 3 to 5 minutes, or until soft and fragrant. Stir in garbanzo beans, and season with salt and pepper; heat through. Place chard in pan, and cook until wilted. Add tomato slices, squeeze lemon juice over greens, and heat through and season with salt and pepper to taste.

Arugula Salad makes about 4 generous servings
2 C fresh arugula, sliced thin 1 sweet bell pepper, sliced thin 1 C toasted sunflower seeds
1 C lettuce, sliced thin 1 / 2 C chopped tomatoes 1 C pear or apple -thin slices
balsamic vinaigrette fresh earth salt fresh ground pepper
Prepare minutes before serving on individual plates. Layer ingredients attractively for color and shape. Dust with the salt and pepper. Sprinkle with the seeds (or favorite toasted nuts) Dress lightly with the vinaigrette and serve immediately.

Nancy Bubel's Roasted Veggies
3-4 bell peppers, chopped
2 whole heads garlic, peeled, each clove cut in several pieces
2-3 onions, sliced or diced fine
1 eggplant
Put peppers, onions, garlic in shallow 9 x 15 pan (or equivalent), pour 1/4-cup olive oil over and mix. Bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes then at 300 for 1 and 1 / 2-2 hours. At same time, roast eggplant in separate oiled pan. Slice eggplant in half lengthwise, put cut side down in oiled pan. Roast for 45-60 minutes till tender. Scoop out eggplant, mix with roasted pepper mix, add seasonings, like salt, pepper, and herbs. Nancy says, " I could live on this." Great with any meal or as a meal in pita, on whole-wheat bread, with cheese, even with baked potatoes. Use your imagination. The house has a wonderful aroma during roasting.

NO Cook Tomato Sauce from SPF member Micki McCoy
6 medium to large tomatoes, cut into large chunks
1 garlic clove. minced
1 Tbsp minced shallot
1 small onion, chopped
3 Tbsp coarsely chopped fresh basil
3-4 Tbsp balsamic vinegar
6-8 Tbsp olive oil
salt & black pepper to taste
Tabasco sauce to taste (optional)
Recipe Instructions:
Drain off and discard any liquid from the tomatoes. Mix the tomatoes with all of the remaining ingredients. Let the mixture stand at room temperature for about 20 minutes. Toss with hot pasta and top with grated Romano or Parmesan cheese. Makes about 8 cups.

September 12, Week 22

Projected Share Menu:

Delicata Squash
store at room temperature

Grape Tomatoes
Store on a countertop

Red Onion
Does not need refrigerated

Sweet Mini Peppers
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Heirloom Tomatoes
Store on a countertop

Sweet White Onion
Store at room temperature

Yellow Bell Peppers
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Collard Greens
Store in a sealed bag in the fridge

Green Peppers
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Red Ripe Tomatoes
Do not refrigerate

Sweet Orange Snack Peppers
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Mixed Lettuce Greens Full Share Only
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Italian Eggplant - Full Share Only
Store in the Veg drawer of the fridge

Please return all of our CSA boxes to your pickup site so that we can recycle them back into the weekly deliveries!

Summer Shares:

Extend your membership for any amount of time until December *pro-rated
Email us your request and we can send you back a confirmation letter and an easy link to further your support of our farm. Your share cost will instantly drop with your commitment!

Our summer zucchini and cucumber season as come to an end. Despite the lingering hot weather, our early fall crops are right on time for their annual mid-September's harvest. Soon, we will be seeing the first newly-dug red potatoes of the year along with the popular spaghetti squash. This week, the delicious delicata squash is in the from the fields and ready to impress with its sweet flavor. We decided to grow this variety of squash for the first time last year and it turned out to be a major hit for our CSA members and at the farmer's markets. The delicata rind is very thin and totally edible. Many say the flavor reminds them of a sweet potato. They should be stored at room temperature "in a beautiful display basket," as my mom would say. Delicata squash can be sautéed, baked, or steamed. I like to cut it into coins and simply sauté like zucchini with some olive oil, garlic, and onions. Topped with some balsamic vinegar and parmesan cheese... you cannot go wrong. Craving baked winter squash without the hassle of heavy slicing and pealing? Roasting the delicata squash will intensify its flavor and once you remove the seeds, the cavity makes for a perfect place to stuff with herbs, cheese, quinoa, etc. Enjoy!

Check out the Italian Fall Soup on the back for a sure-way to enjoy collard greens. This is one of my favorite soups as a kid and I'd recommend it to anyone who is skeptical about collards. They are incredible plants that offer us unique health benefits in the form of cancer protection! It is very important not to overcook collard greens. To help them cook up quickly: evenly slice the leaves into 1/2-inch slices and the stems into 1/4-inch pieces. Let them sit for at least 5 minutes to bring out the health-promoting qualities and then steam for 5 minutes. Suggested pairing with collard greens are smoked or salted meats, vinegar, onion, and peppers. Soup is the easiest way to combine many things in your CSA share into a tasty concoction.

Khaya's Korner: My Little Sister

My little sister's name is Isla. She just turned eleven months old today, but she will be turning a year old in October. Her birthday is on October 5th at 4:23 in the afternoon. She loves to walk around the house to find our mom. Her favorite thing to do is to push aside the baby gate on our stairs so she can crawl up! Also, she has a red ball that she loves tossing off our deck so my brother or I can go get it. But, she can sometimes be naughty too. She pinches me and will bite me if my finger gets too close to her mouth. We love her, but boy, sometimes she can get to be quite a handful! ~ Khaya

Roasted Delicata Squash & Onions
This recipe's great with pork or turkey
Ingredients
2 pounds delicata squash (about 2 large)
1 medium onion, sliced
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 / 4 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon chopped fresh rosemary
1 tablespoon maple syrup
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
Preparation
Preheat oven to 425°F.
Cut squash in half lengthwise, then crosswise; scoop out the seeds. Cut lengthwise into 1 / 2-inch-thick wedges. Toss with onion, 1 tablespoon oil and salt in a large bowl. Spread in an even layer on a baking sheet.
Roast, stirring once or twice, until tender and beginning to brown, about 30 minutes.
Combine the remaining 1 tablespoon oil, rosemary, syrup and mustard in a small bowl. Toss the vegetables with the dressing.

Garlic Delicata
"Very simple, and very good: semicircles of delicata squash dressed with olive oil and fresh parsley and garlic. You can serve this hot from the oven or at room temperature."
Ingredients:
2- 3 delicata squash
1 / 4 cup olive oil
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 / 2 cup chopped fresh parsley
Directions:
Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Oil a 9x13 inch baking dish.
Peel delicata squash, slice in half lengthwise, and remove seeds. Cut into 1 / 2-inch-thick slices. Place in baking dish, and toss with olive oil, garlic, and parsley.
Bake in preheated oven for 30 minutes, or until tender.

Italian Fall Soup with Collards
1 pound ground sausage 1 / 4 cup olive oil
2-1 / 2 C Carrots, sliced 2 qt. Water
2 C onion, chopped 2 qt. Whole tomatoes, chopped or whipped to puree
4 garlic cloves, sliced 1 cups Orzo or Acini de pepe pasta, uncooked
1 bunch Collards or kale-- slice & chop into small shreds
2 tsp salt 1 / 2 tsp pepper
1 T Italian herb seasoning
In large heavy soup pot, brown the sausage & olive oil on med heat. When just about browned add the carrots, onions, garlic, collards. Continue to stir often over medium heat for 15 more minutes. Add the water, tomatoes and all seasonings. Bring to a simmer. Add uncooked orzo pasta, simmer for 15 minutes. Allow to cool & serve the next day for very best flavor.

September 5th, Week 21

This week's *projected CSA menu:

Heirloom Tomatoes
Kale
Garlic
Green Peppers
Yellow Bell Pepper
Mixed Lettuce Greens
Sweet White Onions
Orange Snack Peppers
Red-Ripened Tomatoes
Sweet mini peppers
Cubanelle 'sweet heat' Pepper
Cucumber - Full Only

The Next Open Farm Day is Saturday, September 17th
Bring the whole family from 9 am to 3 pm to tour the farm!

Lots Of New Happenings On The Family Farm:

news from Terra Brownback
For many of you who have been CSA members for many years, you know me as the newsletter writer for the first 21 years of our CSA. In the fall, 2 years ago, our son Lucas, took over the communications with our members, as well as the logistics of deliveries and tracking membership numbers weekly, as well as ongoing email communications with you.
Back in 1978, Mike and I moved to this Perry County farm in our early twenties, practically newlyweds. We had a dream of creating a better world by helping the environment and human health with organic farming. It has been quite a journey. Many years later, we are still farming and now with our 2 sons, Lucas and Will. We are all grateful for the blessings of good health.
This past year has marked some very big transitions in our family and we want to share them with you. Ivory, oldest granddaughter, went off to college, fourth grandchild Isla Mae was born last October, and in November Lucas purchased a home and some land, which borders our farm. This October marks 40 years' marriage for me and Mike and 12 years for Will and Deirdre.

Biggest CHANGE: This October, Mike and I will move out of the farmhouse at Spiral Path Farm and into a home we have been building for the past three years, which is a 6-minute drive from the farm. Mike and I are not retiring at the present oh- maybe someday... We are not ready for that and neither is the farm.
Will, Deirdre, and their three children khaya-11, Jonas 8, and Isla 11 months, are buying the farm and will move to our "now" home at the farm sometime in November. Right now Will drives to work each day as does Lucas. They both live very nearby. Will and family will soon be living at the farm and Deirdre and kids will be nearby all the time. Once our big transition move happens sometime between now and October; we will drive to work and Will will no longer need to drive to work.
Our family has been through many transitions as happens in many a family. I can't share family transitions here without sharing this: Fifteen years ago this past month, our oldest son Arias, died suddenly from a heroin overdose. He loved farming and composting. At 24, he left behind a legacy of the talented, compassionate young man that he was and also a daughter Ivory Moon Brownback, now 19, and a sophomore in college. She has spent all the years since she was 2 in our care. We are living a very full life; best of the best, worst of the worst. We are grateful for everything we have.
It is such a full circle feeling to have raised a family and start our farm from scratch (as they say) and now we welcome our next gen of family farmers, how fortunate we are! To give some perspective: When we started the CSA, Mike and I were both 39. Will was 13 and Lucas was 7!! We have witnessed the growth of clean agriculture as well as the ever troubling environmental problems our world faces. We choose to remain upbeat and work at being part of the solution.
Many of you have been with us on this journey of growing organic produce for some time. We thank all of you for supporting our farm, our employees, and our mission "We are committed to building the fertility of our soils and health of our farm and surrounding woodlands. We strive to provide wonderful tasting, fresh produce to our customers, loaded with nutritional value."

**Cubanelle "sweet heat" Peppers are the mildest hot pepper variety that we grow. They still should be used with caution by removing all of the seeds before cooking or baking with. Cubanelles go great on the grille with some fresh mozzarella, goat, or cream cheese. We also like to use them for stuffed peppers or use their heat to raise the temp mildly in a chili or salsa. They sauté well with other peppers and go great in a cheesesteak or on top of a pizza. Don't be shy to using them if you are not a fan to spicy food; the more they cook... the sweeter they become!

Roasted Peppers --use an outdoor grill (best) or oven broiler
Works for hot peppers or sweet bell peppers, red color is best for flavor & appearance
Split pepper in half lengthwise. Remove the seeds and pulp. Place the peppers- "cup-side" up on grill on high heat. Sprinkle with salt. Allow down side to blacken. Turnover and continue to grill till pepper is soft. Remove from grill. It is not necessary to remove the charred skins; they add a remarkable flavor. But you may peel the outer skin, if desired, at this point. Slice into pieces while still warm, drizzle with olive oil. Serve with good hard cheese (Asiago) and good hearty whole-grained bread. Keeps wonderfully in a ceramic bowl in the fridge for almost 2-3 weeks.

Kale Casserole
1 and 1 / 2 cups cooked brown rice 1 /4 t thyme
1 cup shredded cheese 1 / 4 t ground sage
1 / 4 cup minced green onion 1 / 4 t rosemary
1 / 4 cup minced celery leaves salt & pepper to taste
1 t Worcestershire sauce 2 cups finely chopped kale
1 / 4 cup milk
Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Oil a 1 and 1 / 2 quart covered casserole dish. Mix all ingredients except kale in a bowl. Place half the kale in prepared casserole dish and spread rice mixture over evenly. Cover with remaining kale. Cover and bake 35 minutes, until cheese is melted and bubbling. Makes 4-6 servings.

Sicilian Eggplant by Micki McCoy
2 Tbsp olive oil
3 garlic cloves, minced
1 and 1 / 2 lbs coarsely chopped, peeled tomato (about 2 cups)
1 tsp salt
1 lb eggplant, peeled and cut into 1 / 2 inch cubes (about 4 cups)
1 / 4 cup thinly sliced fresh basil
3/4 lb uncooked spaghetti
6oz fresh mozzarella cheese, cut into 1/4 inch cubes (about 1 cup)
Recipe Instructions:
Place oil and garlic in a large skillet; cook over medium-high heat 30 seconds or until garlic begins to sizzle. Add tomato and salt; cook 15 minutes or until liquid has evaporated. Add the eggplant; cover, reduce heat, and cook 15 minutes or until eggplant is tender. Stir in basil; set aside. Cook pasta in boiling water 9 minutes; drain. Toss with sauce and cheese. Serve immediately. Makes about 7 cups.

Garden Pasta Salad
1-pound Farfalle (bow ties) cooked al dente (firm), drained, leave at room temperature
1 Cup each, chopped fine: 1 green zucchini, 1 gold zucchini, 1 cucumber
2 T minced onion---1 C shredded carrot---1 / 4 C minced fine parsley
1 / 2 C Italian balsamic dressing-—1 / 4 C mayonnaise-—1 t salt-—1 / 4 t black pepper
Toss together-serve. Is best at room temperature, made fresh

Greens and Beans
3 C cooked black-eyed peas, garbanzo, or your choice
1 t thyme, 3 T olive oil, 2-3 bay leaves, 1 large onion chopped, 1 large bunch Swiss chard, kale, or other greens
3 cloves garlic, salt & pepper
Heat oil in skillet, add onions and garlic, sauté with thyme and bay leaves. Add the beans
and chopped greens, cook 1 / 2 hour on low. Season with salt and pepper. Remove bay leaves

August 29th

This week's projected CSA menu:

Watermelon
Sweet Corn
Yellow Bell Peppers
Heirloom Tomatoes
Cucumbers
Mini sweet peppers
Zucchini
Field-Ripened Red Tomatoes
Sweet White Onions
Basil
Orange Snack Peppers
San Marzano Plum Tomatoes
Eggplant- Full Share Only

Another round of delicious sweet corn is in and we've got the watermelon, tomatoes, and peppers to go with it as we transition into September's bounty. Growing watermelons is downright difficult and we still trial new varieties every year in search of the perfect foliage, rind, size, and lifespan all in one melon. In this current field, we grew a trial of 3 different varieties: delicate yellow and two types of seedless reds. A seedless watermelon plant can only grow with a pollinator (seeded melon) in order for it to produce fruit. We plant them together in the same row and let the bees and nature do the rest. This year, the yellow melons were planted as our pollinators for our seedless trials of red melons. These are all coming from the same field and look very much alike. And with growing/traveling vines throughout different rows, melons can mix and match and appear in any combination, so do not be surprised if your melon is a different color than the one listed on your menu. The yellow watermelons are our family favorite and should be handled very delicately. Their rinds are thin and crack very easily. Like many fruit rarities, the yellow watermelon is tough to grow as their foliage (leaves) notoriously dries up in the weather conditions it takes to produce a good melon. Nevertheless, farmers like us are striving for a great yield of them to offer this exclusive crop to our members and we are thrilled to finally have them ripe and ready to share. If you are the lucky recipient of a seedless red, you'll know by their dark green skin that is much heartier and built for shipping than the yellow. Much care was taken to harvest, pack, and bring this last wave of summer melons to you. Enjoy!

Soo many peppers...I can't keep up with them. What should I do?
Peppers are the easiest thing to throw into the freezer for winter. Just chop and freeze in bags. They do not need blanched and can safely store in your freezer for years. You can even freeze whole stuffed peppers for a ready meal to heat up when you are too busy to cook. I freeze peppers in portion amounts so I can just throw them into a sauté pan, soup, casserole, etc. Homemade tomato sauce can also be frozen if you do not have the time or interest to can. Overabundance is a blessing!

Khaya's Korner: Back to School
Today my brother Jonas and I were weeding strawberry plants. We had to pull the weeds out by their roots and pull the flowers off of the plants. Weeding strawberry plants is one of the hardest jobs I've done all year. While weeding, I realized it would be one of my last days working on the farm before school starts. I'm going into 6th grade at West Perry Middle School. My first day is on Monday the 29th. I won't be able to work much after the first day of school. Also, I'm very sorry that I missed everyone on open Farm Day; I was at a wedding in Boston. I look forward to seeing you at the next Open Farm Day! ~Khaya

Crunchy Avocado and Black Bean Salad
1 small shallot, minced
3 tablespoons fresh lime juice
2 teaspoon honey
1 teaspoon fresh lime zest
1 teaspoon olive oil
1 / 2 tsp salt
1 / 4 tsp fresh ground pepper
1 can (15oz) black beans, drained & rinsed
1 red bell pepper, diced
1 / 2 English cucumber, diced
1 avocado, peeled, pitted, diced
Wisk together shallot, lime juice, honey, lime zest, oil, salt and pepper in small bowl.
Combine beans, bell pepper and cucumber in a large bowl. Add dressing, mix well. Add avocado; gently toss to blend.

Heirloom Tomato Salad and Steak with Peppercorns and Basil
1 tablespoon mixed peppercorns
1 teaspoon kosher salt
2 pounds of tomatoes, cut into wedges
2 tablespoons sesame oil
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 teaspoon rice vinegar
1 / 2 teaspoon tamari
a handful of green or purple basil, roughly chopped
1 and 1 / 2 – 2 pounds of steak
Instructions:
Grind/mash the peppercorns and salt together using a coffee grinder, mortar and pestle, rolling pin or knife. Set aside.
Whisk together 1 tablespoon of the sesame oil with the olive oil, rice vinegar, tamari and 1 / 2 teaspoon of the peppercorn and salt mixture.
Rub steaks with the remaining tablespoon of the sesame oil and the remaining peppercorn and salt mixture.
Cook the steaks using your preferred method.
Cover the tomatoes with the dressing and basil.

Bell Peppers and Onions – Quick Stir-Fry
Cut Bell Pepper in half, remove the stems and "guts" seeds and flesh. Peel and slice onions into thick rings. In a large skillet, cast iron is good- melt 1 / 4 C butter or 1 / 4 C olive oil. Add the veg and generous amount of salt and pepper. Stir often over high heat until peppers and onions begin to caramelize(brown) remove from heat. Use as a topping for anything from scrambled eggs to potatoes to steak to rice.

Fiesta Corn
Husk and remove silk from 6-8 ears (or more) of fresh sweet corn. Steam the corn in 2 to 3 inches of water for about 12 minutes. Then, slice the corn off each cob with a sharp knife into a large pan. Melt 1 / 4 C butter or olive oil in a large skillet. Sauté the corn with 1 / 2 C minced green pepper and 1 / 2 C minced red pepper. Stir over high heat until the corn cooks, only about 5 minutes. Sprinkle on 1 T minced parsley or cilantro.

Grilled Eggplant Steak
Make a marinade: 1 T balsamic vinegar, 1 T tamari soy sauce, 2 cloves garlic, minced, 1 / 4 t pepper, 2 T olive oil. Let marinade "brew" for 15 minutes. In a pinch (and Mike and Terra's favorite): Use Gazebo Room Greek dressing. Slice eggplant (unpeeled) lengthwise into 1 / 2 inch steaks. Pour 1 / 4 cup dressing into a 9" x 13" pan-this size works well for the steaks. Dip each steak into dressing, both sides. Allow to marinate for 15 minutes or up to 24 hours in the fridge. Grill or broil for 4- 5 minutes each side, until soft. Remove from heat. Serve with a slice of good cheese, thick slice of tomato and lettuce on a hearty bread sandwich.

August 22

This week's projected CSA menu:

Grape Tomatoes
Do not refrigerate

Yellow Bell Peppers
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

San Marzano Tomatoes
Store at room temperature

Cucumbers
Store in the fridge

Sweet Mini Peppers
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Heirloom Tomatoes
Store on a countertop

Sweet White Onion
Does not need refrigerated

Green Pepper
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Mixed Greens
Store in the fridge

Zucchini
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Field-Ripened Tomatoes
Do not refrigerate

Sweet Orange Snack Peppers
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Cubanelle "sweet heat" Pepper - Full Share Only
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Eggplant - Medium Share
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

We had over 450 people show up to our Open Farm Day this past weekend to dig potatoes, pick herbs/flowers, and take advantage of all the extra produce give-outs! We are always so thrilled to see how many kids and adults are ready to get their hands in the dirt and experience the farm life. There were 240 voters in the tomato taste contest and both categories yielded strong winners. Our red grape tomatoes won by a landslide in the overall contest and the purple Cherokee Carbons took the gold for the best tasting 'tomato slicer'. Thanks to all who were able to attend and we hope to see even more of you for our last big event in September.

Monday morning, the farm woke up to what feels like a whole different climate. It looks like the humidity has finally burned off for us all to really enjoy the last month of summer -outdoors. Watching the high temps drop from 90s to 80s in a week is a considerable difference on our bodies and the plants we are desperately working to maintain. Cooler weather is upon us! We have reached the half-way mark in our CSA season, with 17 weeks to go until mid-December. Our bunched greens like kale and collards are growing fast and are returning soon to your weekly shares. The rain has been a major help on our irrigation efforts and our newly planted fall crops are loving the weather change. Our nightshade crops like tomatoes, peppers, and eggplant are all coming in strong and will continue to do so until mid-October when the first frost usually hits our area.

What happens to the produce once it is picked and when is my CSA box packed?
All of your produce is picked fresh, typically the day before you receive it. We harvest daily for our CSA members based off of what is yielding and will plausibly fit inside the box. Once a wagon of produce comes in from the field, our packing house will immediately put the produce macrobin onto a fan inside the proper cooler. This fan will suck out all of the hot air from the vegetables for several hours, bringing them down to their precisely needed temperature to keep and store in a refrigerator for customers- ideally up to 7 days. The produce is then sorted, graded, and packed inside a CSA share that same day based off of fair division of produce to each sized member. Packing CSA is usually the last (big) task we do at the end of the day. We have 15 packing house employees working over 60 hours a week to receive and grade produce from our fields. Once everything is in- it's pack time! Mistakes happen ... we will happily replace any item that was missed or not properly graded to your satisfaction!

Cubanelle peppers are a mild Hot pepper known for their "sweet heat." They sauté up perfectly with sweet peppers to add a little heat to whatever you are cooking. Enjoy!

Khaya's Korner: Tomato Harvest

Last week my dad told us "We're going to harvest tomatoes before 4-H tonight." So, we climbed into my dad's pickup truck and rode to the farm. My mom drove the tractor up and down the field of tomatoes. My dad picked up bushel baskets from the field and placed them on the wagon. Then, either my brother or I dragged the baskets to the other end of the wagon, while the other one of us watched Isla. We quickly finished the field. Then, my dad put away his tractor. We made it on time to 4-H. ~Khaya

Stuffed Pepper Pot
Love the taste of stuffed peppers? Want it easier & quicker? Try this recipe!
1lb ground beef
1 onion, minced
2 green peppers, diced
2 yellow (or orange or red) pepper, diced
3 cloves garlic, minced
Brown ground beef with all the above in a pot
Add:
1 tsp salt
1 / 2 tsp pepper
1 tbsp fresh basil or oregano, minced
1 tbsp fresh parsley, minced
1 quart (32oz) tomato sauce
Simmer for 20-30 minutes
Add:
2-3 C cooked rice
top with 2 C shredded cheese, allow to melt. Serve!

Zucchini & Fried Pepper Casserole
Tomato Sauce, divided (24oz) 3 C slices of fried peppers (mix colors)
3 zucchini, sliced in 1 / 4 inch rounds (about 5 cups) 1 C sliced fresh mushrooms*optional*
1 / 4 C seasoned bread crumbs 2 T fresh chopped basil
salt and pepper to taste 1 (8oz) shredded mozzarella cheese
Butter 9x13 pan, then spread bottom of pan with 1 and 1 / 2 cups of sauce. Top with layer of zucchini slices, overlapping if necessary. Sprinkle bread crumbs evenly over zucchini. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Top with fried peppers, then mushrooms. Sprinkle with basil. Top with remaining sauce. Bake, covered, 45 minutes or until zucchini is tender. Remove from oven; top with mozzarella cheese. Return to oven, uncovered, 2-3 minutes, until cheese melts. Let rest 20 minutes before serving.

Grilled Eggplant, Cherry Tomato and Romaine Toss
1 tsp minced garlic salt Freshly ground black pepper
2 Tbsp chopped fresh thyme or basil 1 eggplant
2 Tbsp red wine vinegar 1 head romaine lettuce
1 egg white 12 cherry tomatoes, halved
about 5 Tbsp olive oil, divided 1 / 2 cup freshly grated Parmesan Cheese
To make dressing: mash garlic with 1 / 4 tsp salt to make a paste. Combine with thyme or basil, vinegar and egg white. Whisk in 4 Tbsp olive oil and season with pepper. Heat coals on outdoor grill. Slice off a 3inch piece of skin from two opposite sides of the eggplant (this will create a flat edge for grilling). Cut eggplant lengthwise into 4 thick wedges. Brush each with olive oil and grill until tender, 3-5 minutes per side. Cool to room temperature and slice into 3 inch strips. Chop, clean and dry lettuce. Toss lettuce, eggplant, tomatoes, cheese and dressing in large bowl. Season with additional salt and pepper to taste. Makes four servings.

TOMATO SOUP
1 T butter, 2 cloves garlic minced, 2 carrots chopped, 2 celery stalks chopped
2 quarts tomatoes chopped, pinch sugar
1 / 2 C fresh basil or 1 / 4 C dry
salt and pepper to taste
grated parmesan cheese Heat butter in skillet, sauté garlic, carrots, celery. Add tomatoes and simmer 20 minutes. Add sugar, basil, salt and pepper; simmer 10 minutes longer. Top with cheese. Approximately 8 servings. Can try a creamed version by placing in blender when cooked Slowly reheat and whisk in about 1 C cream (or milk) slowly. Will curdle if not done slowly.

August 15th

This week's projected CSA harvest menu:
Sweet Corn
Store in the fridge

Sweet Orange Snack Pepper
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Heirloom Tomatoes
Store on a countertop

Shallots
Store in the fridge

Cucumbers
Store in the fridge

Sweet Mini Peppers
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Sweet White Onion
Does not need refrigerated

Green Peppers
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Zucchini
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Field-Ripened Tomatoes
Do not refrigerate

Eggplant - Full Share
Store in the fridge

Yellow Bell Pepper - Full Share
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Open Farm Day is this Saturday ~ 9 am to 3 pm ~
Details and Invitation included in this week's CSA share
Bring the whole family to see where all of your veggies are grown and get the full farm experience in our "pick your own" gardens

All things "sweet" this week on the CSA menu. The hot summer sun mixed with late afternoon storms has been ripening up some of our sweetest veggies grown on the farm. This second wave of sweet corn could not look better and you can see how much nicer/fuller the ears look compared to the last field enjoyed mainly by the birds. Our colored pepper varieties have fully turned from green to orange bringing on one of our signature crops: sweet "yummy" mini peppers. Yummy is the seed variety and aptly named once you get your hands on this incredible bite sized pepper. There are practically zero seeds inside, so they are a perfect raw snack for kids or pepper-loving adults. Peppers can be eaten during any stage of development from green to fully ripened yellow and finally red late in the season. They are loaded with vitamin C and A and tend to have more nutrients the riper they become. Enjoy and load up on this incredible health-boosting vegetable. Unwashed sweet peppers should be stored in the vegetable compartment of the fridge and can keep up to 10 days. Bell shaped peppers like to be well hydrated and are very sensitive to moisture loss, so we recommend that you include a damp cloth or paper towel in the vegetable compartment to help the peppers retain their moisture. Do not cut out the bell pepper stem prior to storage in the fridge! We will have sweet peppers in for several months so if you feel like you are being overwhelmed, simply chop and freeze. Peppers do not need blanched prior to freezing and can easily go into bags towards your winter supply.

All of our onions, garlic, and shallots have officially cured/dried so they do not need refrigerated anymore – although it will not hurt to still keep them cold if you prefer. We prep these crops for our long term storage shed since there is only one harvest done per season and we like to distribute them out successfully until December. Other crops like red onions and potatoes are due to soon come out of the ground in September and go through the curing process as well. Like our heirloom tomatoes? We grow 4 distinct varieties: Chef's Choice (orange), Cherokee Carbon (dark purple), Big Brandy (pink), and Tie Dye (red and yellow).
Come and sample them all at our Open Farm Day this weekend!

Spicy Corn Stuffed Tomato Salad from Kathy Bennett
6 Sm. Ripe tomatoes
1 / 2 c. Creamy Buttermilk Dressing (Ranch)
2 T. Parsley (snipped)
1 / 4tsp. Pepper
Dash Ground Red Pepper
2 C. cooked fresh corn kernels
1 / 2 c. shredded Monterey Jack Cheese
1 / 4 c. chopped green pepper (or any bell pepper)
1 / 4 c. chopped cucumber
1 / 4 c. chopped onion
Lettuce leaves
Place the tomatoes (stem end down) on a cutting board and cut into 4-6
wedges each, cutting into but not through the stem end. Spread wedges
apart slightly; sprinkle with salt. Cover; chill. In a small mixing
bowl, combine dressing, parsley, pepper and red pepper. In another bowl,
combine corn, cheese, green pepper, cucumber and onion. Add dressing
mixture; toss gently to coat. Cover; chill. Serve tomatoes filled with
corn mixture over lettuce on individual plates.

Roasted Cornucopia-—not sure what to do with lots of your produce this week??
Try this...your home will have the smell of comfort food all week...
Coat at least 2 baking sheets with olive oil. Prep many veggies. The following combination works very well: peeled and cubed eggplant, slices of zucchini, peppers, & yellow squash, potato cubes, tomato wedges, cabbage sliced, diced hot pepper in small amount, garlic & onions slices, carrots sticks. The addition of other veg is delightful too, be creative. Place all in a large bowl. Drizzle with more olive oil. Sprinkle at least 1 t salt, 1 / 4 t black pepper. Toss well coating all veggies; add chopped fresh herbs, (parsley, oregano etc.) or dried herbs, your favorite. Lay out onto the oiled baking sheets. Bake in hot 400-degree oven for about 1 hour until the veggies begin to brown and caramelize. Reverse the sheets in oven (front to back, rack to rack) 3x during process. Do not stir. The salt helps to remove moisture and season the mix. Excellent served in an omelet, or over rice/pasta or on a slice of good hearty bread. Keeps in the fridge for up to 2 weeks.

Zucchini and Roasted Peppers with Pasta from Karen Collins
1 1 / 2 lb zucchini, unpeeled, cut lengthwise and sliced thin
1/8 tsp salt
2 peppers: red, orange, yellow, or green. seeded and halved
1 / 4 c extra virgin olive oil
1 / 8 tsp pepper
3 / 4 c shaved parmesan cheese
1 clove garlic, halved
Season zucchini with salt and place in large colander to drain for 1 hr. Preheat broiler.
Place peppers on baking sheet cut-side down. Broil peppers for 10-15 minutes until skin is blackened and blistery. Place peppers in tightly closed paper bag for 15 minutes. Remove skins and slice into thin strips. Set aside.
Heat olive oil in a large skillet. Add garlic and zucchini. Cook for 2-3 minutes until zucchini is tender. Add peppers and season with salt and pepper. Set aside. Discard garlic clove.
Cook pasta in boiling salted water (I use Penne Pasta) following cooking instructions. Drain well and add to zucchini mixture. Mix well, transfer to serving dish and top with cheese.

August 8th

Cantaloupe
Store in the fridge

Heirloom Tomatoes
Store on a countertop

Cucumbers
Store in the fridge

Italian Parsley
Store in a sealed bag in the fridge

Eggplant
Store in the fridge

Red-Ripened Tomatoes
Do not refrigerate

Sweet White Onions
Store in a bag in the fridge

Green Peppers
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Zucchini
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

San Marzano Plum Tomatoes
Do not refrigerate

Seedless Watermelon (Full Share)
Store in the fridge

Basil (Full Share)
Do not refrigerate

The endless harvest of tomatoes has begun. We grow many different varieties on the farm that each require different harvesting approaches and it certainly feels like the "dog days" of summer now that they are all ripening simultaneously. Each tomato has its own flavor and texture so we will let you decide on our Open Farm Day which will take the crown in the tomato taste contest. Newly in are our "solid gold" grape tomatoes. These are a favorite among kids and a sweet addition to any salad or snack. Sauce makers: our special variety of San Marzano plum tomatoes are starting to come in your CSA shares each week. These oval-shaped tomatoes are the ideal variety to cook with. Their skins will easily slide off once they are hot and their flesh and taste makes for some incredible pasta sauce. San Marzano tomatoes are also identified as Italian plums or Roma tomatoes. Get creative and get cooking! This is definitely the month to try out making your own homemade tomato sauce - maybe even conquer canning. Our heirloom tomato crop is larger than ever as the popularity of these old fashioned tomatoes has blossomed in recent years due to their refreshing flavor, texture, and crazy colors. To be a certified heirloom, these tomatoes have to be grown from seed that has produced the same variety of tomato for at least fifty years! The tomato seeds must also be grown outside and pollinated, and they cannot be hybrid tomatoes, as is the case with store bought varieties of red tomatoes where seeds are cross pollinated to toughen their resistance to parasites and lengthen their shelf life.
Melons are continuing to ripen with our cantaloupes tasting and producing better than ever! We hope you are enjoying their long season this year as much we are.

Khaya's Korner: The Pack Line

Sometimes people ask me "Where's your favorite place to work on the farm?" Most of the time my answer is "The pack house". The vegetables get washed and graded before they go in your box. The boxes travel down a conveyor belt and everyone puts one item in. Sometimes I put onions or potatoes in medium or full share boxes. Occasionally I put the lids on the boxes. Once, I stacked some of the boxes onto a pallet and wrapped it in plastic. We work very hard to give you these wonderful fruits and vegetables. ~ Khaya

Please make sure to return all share boxes to your pickup site so we can recycle them back into our deliveries and help reduce unnecessary waste.
It's that time of year with tender items like tomatoes and melons that can get easily damaged or crushed in transit. You are more than welcome to take the entire CSA box in efforts to keep your weekly share of produce packed and safe till it gets home.

The Next Open Farm Days are August 20th and September 17th

Ratatouille from Dan Kaplan of Brookfield Farm
2 tbsp olive oil
2 medium bell peppers, cubed
1 medium onion, chopped
1 to 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
3 medium tomatoes, chopped
1 medium eggplant, peeled and cubed
1 medium zucchini or squash, cubed
Chopped fresh parsley, oregano and basil
Heat the oil in a large, heavy skillet over medium heat. Sauté the peppers, onion, and garlic until soft; stir in the tomatoes, eggplant, zucchini, and herbs.
Cover and simmer for about 30 minutes.

Chilled Gazpacho Soup serves 4
4 Cups Tomatoes, chopped, 2 C vegetable or beef broth, 1 C diced cucumber
1 C diced Green/Red /or Orange Pepper, 1 / 2 C diced sweet onion
2 T sugar or 1 T agave nectar
1 T lemon juice, 1 t salt, several dashes Worcestershire sauce, 10-12 drops Tabasco sauce
(or 1 / 2 T very finely minced jalapeno pepper, no seeds)
6 ice cubes, chopped or small.
Mix together. Allow soup to stand 30 minutes. Float diced cucumber on top.

Roasted Tomato Sauce
–this recipe can be used with plum tomatoes, red round tomatoes, or heirloom tomatoes or any combination thereof.
Heat oven to 400°
Line two baking sheets with aluminum foil
Prepare 8-10 C Tomatoes –Halve the tomatoes, (no need to remove skins) place in a large bowl, drizzle with olive oil and toss coating all tomatoes with oil. Place in a single layer on prepared baking sheets. Sprinkle with salt, pepper.
Roast for about one hour or until the tomatoes edges start to turn brown and most of the liquid around the tomatoes has caramelized, about 1 hour. Cool on the tray. process tomatoes in a blender, food processor or vitamix -this will make a smooth sauce-pour sauce into a large skillet. Add 1 / 2 C minced onion, 1 T minced garlic, 2 t sugar, 1 t black pepper, I t dried oregano and 1 t dried basil. Stir into tomato sauce and simmer for 10 minutes. Season to taste with additional salt, pepper, and sugar if desired.

"Zuked up" Tomato Sauce (Zucchini enriched)
2 C Tomato sauce
2 C diced/or shredded green zucchini *diced makes chunky sauce-shredded for those who like smooth
1 C diced/or shredded gold zucchini *diced makes chunky sauce-shredded for those who like smooth
1 / 4 C minced fresh oregano
1 Tbsp minced Italian parsley
1 Tbsp minced basil
1 / 4 C minced onion
1 tsp minced garlic
1 / 4 tsp black pepper
*addition of 1 lb browned ground beef or sausage if you want
Mix all these ingredients in a skillet and simmer on low for 15 minutes.
Serve over 1 lb organic angel hair pasta
Top with 1 / 2 C shredded Italian cheese blend

August 1st

This week's *projected CSA harvest menu:

Cantaloupe
Store in the fridge

Heirloom Tomato (Full Share)
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Sweet Corn
Store in the fridge

Garlic
Store at room temperature

Eggplant
Store in the fridge

Sweet White Onion
Store in a bag in the fridge

Green Pepper
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Mixed Greens (Full Share)
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Zucchini
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Tomatoes
Do not refrigerate

Cucumbers
Store in the fridge

*HOT* Pepper: Jalapeno or Hot Wax
Store in the fridge

Watermelon (Full Share Only)
Store in the fridge

Please make sure to return all share boxes to your pickup site so we can recycle them back into our deliveries and help reduce unnecessary waste.
It's that time of year with tender items like tomatoes and melons that can get easily damaged or crushed in transit. You are more than welcome to take the entire CSA box in efforts to keep your weekly share of produce packed and safe till it gets home.

An inch and a half of much needed rain poured down on the farm this past Saturday evening. This was the first good rainfall that we have had since the dry spell and it was a major relief on the plants and irrigation. August is officially here and we are starting the month off with a HUGE sweet corn harvest. We hope you enjoy our certified Organic GMO-free sweet corn variety called Vision. We're talking sweet corn that wasn't sprayed with animal killing chemicals, so do not be too freaked out by a bug or worm as you peel back the husks. Simply cut off that area. Most of our first wave of corn was badly damaged by the birds- pecking at the top kernels and then followed up by an army of insects attracted to the sweet smell of fresh corn. We do share the world with other species and this is a basic part of agriculture and eating fresh food. We appreciate your understanding of this very difficult consumer mountain organic farming must climb to compete. Our "sugar cube" cantaloupes are continuing to yield heavy and they taste as sweet as their name. Most of the melons in the U.S. are grown in Arizona and New Mexico as they like it hot and extremely dry. We only pick them ripe from the vine so they are ready to eat when you receive them. Our special heirloom tomatoes are starting to come in. These are a tomato-lover's top shelf pick. This is what a tomato originally looked like in the 1500's and their flavor and texture speaks for itself. We grow 6 different types that you will see over the course of the next few months. I like to call this CSA box the "chili or salsa starter pack." There is basically everything in here needed to make either one with a hot pepper included to match the intense heat wave we are all feeling lately. Please be aware that these peppers are hot to the touch and should be handled with caution when it comes to raw skin or young children! Enjoy the big summer bounty

Khaya's Korner: Sweet Corn
It felt like it took a million years for sweet corn season to begin, and now that it is here I'm so excited! I love to roll my sweet corn in butter and salt to make it extra tasty. What do you like to put on you corn? You can email me at csa@spiralpathfarm.com with your answer. Anyways everybody in my family loves sweet corn. Even my little sister! It's like giving a kitten warm milk. You can't go wrong! So, try our sweet corn. It might be your new favorite food~ Khaya

Terra's Three Bean Chili
Can be made vegetarian or with meat, both are delicious.
Chop an entire celery (with leaves also)
1 C sliced /diced onion
1 green pepper, diced ( or any color pepper )
5 cloves garlic, minced, use less if you want.
1 / 4 C chopped cilantro or parsley
1 or 2 Hungarian hot wax peppers or Jalapenos chopped finely, remove seeds and dice
or 1 t dry crushed red pepper or 1 / 2 C minced cubanelle pepper
1-2 lbs ground beef (optional)
Sauté beef with all vegetables and 1 / 4 C olive oil for about 15 minutes. Add 1 quart of tomatoes canned or fresh chopped, 1 qt water, 4 veggie or beef bouillon cubes or stock instead of water. Add 1 can (2-1/2 lb) red kidney beans, 1 can of black beans and 1 can white cannellini beans. Of course you may precook these beans from scratch as I do when able. This is a time saver to use canned. Add 3 T chili powder, 1 / 2 t pepper and 2 t salt. Should be very thick; add more water if needed at this point, just to barely cover. Bring to a boil and then simmer one hour. This makes a large pot. Do not add the hot wax peppers if you like it milder. Use jalapeno if you like it rippin hot.. All soups have a wonderful taste after aged/chilled for a day or two.

Fresh Salsa
1-1 / 2 C chopped tomatoes, mixed with 1 / 2 t salt
-- allow them to drain in a colander for 15 minutes
1 C chopped onions
2 cloves garlic, crushed
2 T minced green pepper,
1 T minced hot pepper (make this measurement to taste)
or use 1 / 4 t dried crushed red pepper
1 T minced fresh cilantro
addition of sweet corn
Mix and enjoy as a dip with tortilla chips.

Eggplant with Tomatoes
1 large eggplant 2 Tbsp butter
1 C. whole-kernel corn (best with fresh corn cut from the cob) 2-4 tomatoes, sliced
1 / 4 C. bread crumbs 1 / 2 t. sugar
1 t. salt 1 / 2 t. pepper
1 Tbsp grated cheese (your choice)
Peel eggplant, slice in 1 / 4 inch slices, cook in boiling salted water (1 / 2 t. per quart) for 10 minutes; drain. Butter a casserole dish, layer eggplant, corn, and tomatoes in casserole. Cover with the crumbs, sugar, salt, and pepper. Bake for 30 minutes at 300 degrees; sprinkle with cheese; place back in oven until cheese melts.
We've made this without the cheese and it's still good.

Eggplant Sauteed with Garlic
2 Cups cubed, peeled eggplant 1 Tbsp chopped fresh parsley
Salt 1 / 2 tsp freshly ground pepper
2 Tbsp olive oil lemon wedges, for garnish
2 cloves garlic, chopped
Sprinkle eggplant with 1 / 2 tbsp salt and place in colander to drain for 30 minutes. Rinse and drain on a towel. In a skillet, heat the oil, add the garlic and eggplant, and sauté over medium heat about 10 minutes, until almost soft. Add parsley, pepper, and salt to taste, and continue cooking another 3-4 minutes. Serve hot with lemon wedges. Serves 2-3

July 25th

This week's *projected CSA harvest menu:

Cantaloupe - Full Share
Store in the fridge

Tomatoes
Do Not refrigerate

Cucumbers
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Zucchini
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Sweet White Onion
Store in a bag in the fridge

Asian Eggplant
Store in the fridge

Mixed Lettuce Greens
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Green Pepper
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

"Solid Gold" Grape Tomatoes - Full Share only most likely
Do not refridgerate

It's melon season now! Monday morning my phone buzzed with a heat advisory, warning our entire area to stay inside and avoid doing strenuous activities. I laughed and quickly shrugged it off by directly opening up a message from my Dad saying "cantaloupes are ready, harvest first thing." And that we did. All of the cantaloupe plants were wet and happy from the rain we received the night before. It was very brief and not even close to amount of rain needed to soak and replenish the ground, but enough to perk up the plants and give them some relief. That tiny amount of rain was enough to really bring this crop of melons on and they seem to ripen further by the morning hours. In the next field over, little broccoli and fall cabbage plants were looking much better than they did in previous weeks. All of our precious fall crops like leeks and Brussel sprouts, that are already planted in the ground, were really in dire need of the natural rain at their young age. Simultaneously, our field crew had also begun picking our first ripened watermelons. All of our melons are picked ripe and are ready to eat when you receive them. Picking melons is pretty easy; if the melon is the correct color and falls right off the vine -it's ready! Absolutely refrigerate cantaloupes and watermelons to prevent them from going bad. We will rotate the varieties as best as we can to ensure that you get to sample them all.
It's hard to believe it is almost August until I open my fridge to make dinner!

Coming soon: sweet corn (next week!), orange peppers, and many varieties of field tomatoes: heirlooms, San Marzano plums, grape tomatoes, and more.

The Next Open Farm Days are August 20th and September 17th

Please make sure to return all share boxes to your pickup site so we can recycle them back into our deliveries and help reduce unnecessary waste.
It's that time of year with tender items like tomatoes and melons that can get easily damaged or crushed in transit. You are more than welcome to take the entire CSA box in efforts to keep your weekly share of produce packed and safe till it gets home.

Khaya's Korner: The Pool

On hot summer days I love to jump into the nice refreshing pool! At the farm we have a pool that is 9 feet deep! I love to do tricks off the diving board into the pool! I know how to dive, do flips, and do handstands. Sometimes if I work with my dad or my grandma, we jump in the pool afterwards to cool down. It is also very fun when someone throws a ring to the bottom of the pool, and you have to catch it! If you want, you can get in the pool, get out, jump on the trampoline to get hot, and then get in the pool again. My little sister Isla also loves being in her float in the cool pool. So, if you want to make a splash this summer, go to a pool! ~Khaya

Eggplant @ Summer Solstice
Terra and Mike created this dish on Summer Solstice evening to celebrate the longest daylight of the year.
1-2 Oriental Eggplant, peeled and cubed
1 / 4 C olive oil
4 cloves of garlic, minced (garlic lovers: add more)
1 onion, sliced
2 T chopped fresh oregano
1 C shredded cheese, mozzarella
In a large skillet, heat olive oil till hot. Add eggplant, garlic, onions until eggplant is very soft, almost mushy. Add extra oil if need be and stir frequently. You want to caramelize the onions and garlic for extra flavor. Turn the pan off and top with cheese and oregano. Place a lid on and allow to stand another 5 minutes. Delicious alone or especially on a slice of good bread with tomato.

Zucchini Lasagna (Lasagne) From Barb Hench
2 1 / 2 cups zucchini, sliced 1 / 4-inch-thick (about 2 medium)
1 / 2 lb lean ground beef (I use 1 lb.)
1 / 4 cup onion, chopped
2 small tomatoes, cut up
1 (6 ounce) can tomato paste
1 garlic clove, minced
1 / 2 teaspoon dried oregano
1 / 2 teaspoon dried basil
1 / 4 teaspoon dried thyme
1 / 4 cup water
1 / 8 teaspoon pepper
1 egg
3 / 4 cup low fat cottage cheese (or low fat or fat free ricotta)
1 / 2 cup mozzarella cheese, shredded (I use 8 oz. divided)
1 teaspoon flour
Cook zucchini until tender, drain and set aside. Fry meat and onions until meat is brown and onions are tender; drain fat. Add next 8 ingredients and bring to a boil.
Reduce heat; simmer, uncovered 10 minutes or until reduced to 2 cups.
In small bowl slightly beat egg.
Add cottage cheese, half of shredded cheese and flour.
In (1 1/2-qt.) baking-roasting pan arrange half of the meat mixture. Top with half of the zucchini and all the cottage cheese mixture. Top with remaining meat and zucchini.
Bake uncovered at 375 degrees F for 30 minutes.
Sprinkle with remaining cheese. Bake 10 minutes longer.
Let stand 10 minutes before serving.

July 18th

This week's *projected CSA Share Menu:

Tomatoes
Do Not refrigerate. Leave on a counter to further ripen if desired

Basil
Do Not refrigerate. Store out of direct sunlight right in the bag

Cucumbers
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Zucchini
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Sweet White Onions
Store in a bag in the fridge

Swiss Chard
Store in a sealed bag in the fridge

Mixed Lettuce Greens
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Green Peppers - (Full Share)
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Sweet Potatoes
Do Not refrigerate. Store in a cool dry place

Asian Eggplant (mediums)
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Central PA is drought-stricken with an intense week of heat ahead of us. My mind has been on all of the field workers who brave the heat -day in and day out to provide us all with food through rigorous conditions. Thank you: Humberto, Lorenzo, Barnardo, Basilio, Emanuel, Rafafael, Francisco, Isau, Marcos, Juan, Artemio, Hugo, Pablo, Alex, Bertimeo, and Daniel. We are forever grateful for your hard work and undeniable strength and importance in our lives. One of my most profound experiences was witnessing a storm rolling in over the hills of Spiral Path last week. All across the farm, you could hear the cheerful 'hoots and hollers' of the field workers in celebration that the skies were about to break open and give them some relief in the brutal heat. Cheers rang out all across the fields from every direction and I couldn't help but think to myself after 30 years of being conditioned to work outside as a farm kid -"these guys are my heroes" and I couldn't fathom what they do every day to bring us all our precious fresh food. And what about the plants and local small farmers who are unable to irrigate on this level? Farmers are predicting a major rise in produce costs, especially corn, this summer due to the deadly draught. This really puts the emphasis on CSA programs and the importance of locking in your produce source and experiencing the reality of growing seasons with your local farmers.

Good news: Our sweet corn crop is staying hydrated and is steady growing to be ready for our first annual harvest for the last week of July. It seems as though the hot summer has everyone craving tomatoes, corn, and watermelons – very early this year. Don't let the heat fool you into thinking summer crops will magically ripen and appear. OUTDOOR tomatoes, corn, and peppers will always be in season and yielding in central PA from August – October. We are still harvesting greenhouse tomatoes and we just had our first yield of green peppers that will slowly ripen to yellow, orange, and finally red. The first garlic has been pulled and is currently curing and will be in your CSA share soon. Cantaloupe is growing and also coming very soon with red and yellow watermelons to follow! Enjoy the July bounty.

Khaya's Korner: 4-H

I am in the 4-H club, Kistler Clovers. We meet the second Tuesday of every month. The 4 H's stand for head, heart, hands, and health. At the very beginning of the meeting, we say the 4-H pledge. It goes like this: "I pledge my head to clearer thinking, my heart to greater loyalty, my hands to larger service, and my health to better living, for my club, my community, my country, and my world". At our meetings, we play games, sing songs, and learn about livestock. At the very end of our meeting, we get snack. We can also participate in activities such as basketry, photography, cake decorating, jewelry making, and much more! Also, we do community service and help out with things around town. Every year, we even have a Pet Night, where we can bring our pet and talk about it. They don't have 4-H everywhere, but you should start thinking about joining a good club where you live ~ Khaya

The Next Open Farm Days are August 20th and September 17th

Zucchini Pizza from CSA member Pam Wiedeman
3 and 1 / 2 C zucchini, coarsely grated
2 eggs, lightly beaten
2 C shredded mozzarella, divided
1 / 2 C parmesan cheese, grated
1 / 3 C flour
1 T olive oil
1 C pizza sauce
chopped oregano, basil to taste
1 / 8 t dried red pepper
Preheat oven to 350; grease a 13 x 9 x 2" casserole dish.
Press grated zucchini between paper towels to remove excess moisture.
Combine zucchini, eggs, 1 C mozzarella, parmesan, and flour in medium bowl; mix well.
Spread zucchini mixture into prepared casserole dish; bake uncovered at 350 for 20-25 minutes.
Remove dish from oven; set oven to broil
Brush surface with olive oil; broil 5 and 1 / 2" from heat for 5 minutes.
Remove from oven; reset oven to 350.
Spread pizza sauce on top of zucchini mixture; sprinkle with remaining mozzarella, herbs and red pepper; bake uncovered at 350 for additional 20 minutes or until cheese is bubbly.

SWISS CHARD PIE
1 onion, chopped 1 garlic clove, minced
1 bunch swiss chard, trimmed and chopped
6 eggs 2 T oil 1 t salt 2 pie crusts
1 cup shredded cheese
Heat oven to 400 degrees. Brown onion and garlic in oil, add chard, cook to wilt. Beat eggs in bowl, mix in cheese, salt and chard mix. Pour into 2 pie crusts and bake 30-40 minutes until a knife in center comes out clean. Makes 2 pies.

Curried Zucchini Soup from Member Rachel Gross
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 small onion, chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced
2 lbs zucchini or yellow squash, diced (about 7 cups diced)
1 medium or large sweet potato, diced
2 teaspoons curry powder
Salt to taste
Pinch of cayenne
4 cups vegetable stock
Heat the olive oil over medium heat in a large, heavy soup pot and add the onion and garlic. Cook, stirring, until it is tender, about 5 minutes. Add curry powder, cayenne and salt and stir for about a minute, until the spices smells fragrant. Add the zucchini and sweet potato. You may need to add some of the stock to cover the bottom of the pot. Stir for 5-6 minutes. Then add the rest of the stock. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat, cover and simmer 20 minutes until the zucchini and sweet potato are very tender. Puree' the soup with an immersion blender or in batches in a blender.

Week of July 11th

The Next Open Farm Day is Saturday, August 20th from 9 am to 3 pm

This week's projected CSA harvest menu:

Cabbage
Store in the fridge

Asian Eggplant
Store in the veg drawer in the fridge

Cucumbers
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Fresh Thyme
Store bag in the fridge or see newsletter for drying methods

Zucchini
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Sweet White Onions
Store in a bag in the fridge

Red Beets
Store in a sealed bag in the fridge

Mixed Lettuce Greens
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Shallots
Store at room temperature

Tomatoes
Do Not Refrigerate. Leave on a countertop to further ripen if desired

We are so thrilled to have our first-ever successful harvest of shallots on the farm. Shallots are in the same family as onions and garlic and can range in color from golden brown, gray, to red rose. Their off-white insides can also be tinged with green and magenta. They have an incredible mild flavor, very similar to an onion, and can make any meal taste gourmet. Three to four shallots can be substituted for 1 onion in any recipe. Our shallots have already been cured, meaning dried out for long-term storage, so they should not be refrigerated. Shallots can be kept at room temperature and can store up to 6 months or longer. Add them to any meal and enjoy this highly requested new crop!

Eggplant lovers – your time has come. We are now harvesting the first of our Asian eggplant variety. These eggplants are thinner and more tender than the larger well-known Italian bell variety. They are the perfect size for cutting into coins and grilling. Their tenderness also makes for a perfect diced additive to a stir-fry. The first harvest is always the smallest, so get ready for much more to come.

Fresh Thyme is your cooking herb this week. Many recipes call for either 1 sprig or in teaspoon amounts. You can easily strip the thyme leaves from their woody stem by scraping with the back of a knife or simply using your fingers to strip off. The most common places to find fresh thyme are in pork, chicken, or beef roast. Thyme in olive oil is a perfect rub for meats, fish, and eggplant. Cooked shallots and thyme can add an extensive flavor to any dish. Check out some of the recipes on the back for suggestions. New to using fresh herbs? Be brave and creative. Cooking herbs with vegetables cannot go wrong. Once you begin to use herbs, your "taste memory" will most likely recall the different dishes you have had them in before. Dried thyme holds its flavor better than most herbs. For long term use: simply lay out the springs to dry on a paper towel. You can then strip the leaves and store in a sealed jar at room temperature to use throughout the remainder of the growing season.

Khaya's Korner: Family Farm Fest

About every 5 or 6 years we have Family Farm Fest, which is basically a family reunion. Everyone helps out by bringing a food dish to eat or a drink of some sort. Sometimes we have about 60 people camping out on our front lawn. It's in the very hottest peak of summer, so the heat annoys us all. The good thing is that we that a nice, 9 ft. deep, in ground pool to keep us cooled off. Also, there are some fun activities to do, like kayaking on the pond, bouncing on the trampoline, a volleyball tournament, and fast rides on the four- wheeler. We just had a Family Farm Fest last summer, so the next one probably won't be until I'm 14 or 15. So, in the summertime, visit with some family members you haven't seen in a while. It's really fun! ~Khaya

Roasted Chicken with Shallots and Thyme
2 lemons
2 (2.5 pound) whole chickens
2 large onions, peeled and quartered
6 shallots, coarsely chopped
8 cloves garlic, unpeeled
3 tablespoons olive oil
salt and pepper to taste
1 / 2 cup butter, softened
8 sprigs fresh thyme
Preheat oven to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C). Lightly grease a medium baking dish.
Pierce lemons several times with a fork, and place 1 inside each chicken cavity. Arrange chickens in the center of the prepared baking dish. Place onions, shallots, and garlic around the chickens. Sprinkle vegetables with olive oil, and season with salt and pepper. Spread butter over the chickens, and line each with thyme sprigs.
Bake 20 minutes in the preheated oven. Increase temperature to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C), and continue baking 30 minutes, or until exterior of chicken is golden brown, meat is no longer pink, and juices run clear. Allow to cool about 15 minutes before serving.

Zucchini Oven Chips from CSA Member Sue Thomas
1 / 4 C. dry breadcrumbs
1 / 4 grated fresh Parmesan cheese
1 / 4 tsp. seasoned salt
1 / 4 tsp. garlic powder
1 / 8 tsp. black pepper
2 tbsp. milk
2 and 1 / 2 cups ( 1 / 4-inch-thick) slices zucchini (about 2 small)
Combine first 5 ingredients in a medium bowl, stirring with a whisk. Place milk in a shallow bowl. Dip zucchini slices in milk and dredge in breadcrumb mixture. Place coated slices on a cookie sheet coated with cooking spray. Bake at 425 for 30 minutes or until browned and crisp. Serve immediately.

Lemon Orzo Primavera
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 cup uncooked orzo pasta
1 clove garlic, crushed
1 medium zucchini, shredded
1 medium carrot, shredded
1 (14 ounce) can vegetable broth
1 lemon, zested
1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme
1 / 4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
Heat the oil in a pot over medium heat. Stir in orzo, and cook 2 minutes, until golden. Stir in garlic, zucchini, and carrot, and cook 2 minutes. Pour in the broth and mix in lemon zest. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer 10 minutes, or until liquid has been absorbed and orzo is tender. Season with thyme and top with Parmesan to serve.

July 4th

This week's *projected CSA harvest menu:

Tomato
Do not refrigerate- Leave on a countertop to further ripen if desired

Basil (Full Share)
Do Not refrigerate-
Store bag on a countertop out of direct sunlight

Cucumbers
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Green & Gold Zucchini
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Candy White Onion
Store in a bag in the fridge

Sweet Potatoes
Do not refrigerate
Store in a cool dark place

Mixed Lettuce Greens
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Kale
Store in a sealed bag in the fridge

On July 4th this year we decided to celebrate the holiday "farm-style" and pulled up the first summer onions of the season! There is something so satisfying about uprooting a big round onion, or any root vegetable, from the earth. These special "candy" sweet white onions are as fresh as you can get them, right out of the ground with their green stems still intact. When an onion is so fresh like this, we recommend storing it in the fridge. They are not cured before you receive them for long-term storage like our fall onions. Curing is a process when the tops are dried down and removed and the onion bulb becomes a somewhat stable vegetable, able to be stored at room temperature. For the white onions, this is what we do at the farm kitchen: slice the roots off, strip down skins which are loose/wilted. Rinse the onions off and store in a plastic bag in refrigerator. We will be harvesting the sweet white onions for quite some time before we get into our yellow and red varieties. Personally, the white onion is my favorite and don't let the word sweet fool you into thinking it cannot pair with anything in your CSA share! This onion can (and should) be used in any recipe. They are amazing on the grill or raw on salads. You can expect to receive onions every week throughout the summer now, so if you are getting behind on using them please remember that you can always just chop and freeze. Onions do not need to be blanched before they are put into the freezer and I now feel safe enough to use the last (2) of mine up from last year -now that the new ones are in! If you plan it just right...

The first red-round tomatoes of the season are ripe and ready. They are coming out of a greenhouse, of course, this time of year. We would love for our tomatoes to be strictly-grown outdoors for flavor and nutrition but you would not see them until the end of July! In a world of sustainability and growing consumer demands – a greenhouse tomato crop is essential for us to keep up with our farmer's markets and the rise of local CSA programs. In Pennsylvania, tomatoes cannot be safely planted outdoors until after Mother's Day. We figured with all of the lettuce, squash, and herbs lately – no one would mind! Enjoy ~

Khaya's Korner: Cooking Projects

My grandma Terra and I love to have a great time in the kitchen. We will plan certain cooking dates where we can make a meal/ dessert based on what is in season at the farm. My favorite meal to make is an Asian rice and chicken stir-fry with soy sauce. My favorite dessert to make is cheesecake with a fresh strawberry or two on top. Making food is fun, and sometimes my grandma and I like to jazz it up a bit. We like to pretend we have a cooking show, and give our "audience" cooking tips and suggestions. We tell them how to prepare the meal, the ingredients, even fun little cooking jokes. I love making fresh food with organic ingredients from the farm. Next time you want to prepare a meal, try it! - Khaya

Kale Kavish
1 / 4 C olive oil
1 bunch of kale, regular or Tuscan, rinsed and finely minced, may also mince stems
2 onions, chopped
5 cloves garlic, chopped, more is great too
3 red peppers, diced, can use green pepper too but red color is great
5 carrots, coin sliced
1 yellow squash, coin sliced
1 / 4 C water
2 C shredded sharp cheddar cheese
Sauté onions, garlic, red pepper, yellow squash and carrots in olive oil until softened. Add the kale and stir over high heat until kale turns a bright green. Then add 1 / 4 c water and cover to steam for another 5-8 minutes, stirring occasionally. Top with cheese and serve over your favorite pasta or rice

Summer Squash Bake
Mix all together in one bowl:
2 C grated zucchini (with skins)
1 C grated yellow squash (with skins)
1 and 1 / 2 C Shredded cheese (cheddar works well)
3 eggs
1 C flour
1 / 2 C milk
1 tsp salt
1 / 2 tsp pepper
1 tsp dried Italian seasoning (or 1 tbsp fresh chopped basil)
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 / 4 C onion, minced
Butter a 9x9 glass pan or casserole dish. Spread above mixture in pan. Top with sliced tomatoes, sprinkle with parmesan cheese. Bake @ 375 for 25 minutes. Enjoy warm or cold!

Summer Squash Rounds Submitted by Maryann & Dennis Mawhinney
About 2 pounds of zucchini
3 Tbs. butter
salt and pepper to taste
1 Tbs. honey
3-4 Tbs. minced fresh mint leaves
Cut the squash into ¼ inch-thick slices. Place the butter in a large skillet and turn the heat to medium high. When its foam subsided, add the squash and sprinkle with salt and pepper.
Raise the heat to high and cook, stirring occasionally, until the squash becomes tender and begins to brown, about 15 minutes. Stir in the honey and mint, check the seasoning, and serve.

Thai Cucumber Salad
1 Cup water
1 Cup rice vinegar
1 Cup raw organic sugar or 1 / 3 c agave
1 / 2 t salt
2 C thinly slice cucumbers
1 / 2 C sweet onion, sliced thin
1 T fresh cilantro, minced
Bring the four ingredients to a boil and simmer for 5 minutes. Allow to cool. Pour over cucumbers, cilantro, and onions. Allow to brew for one hour. Serve. Addition of chopped tomatoes is delicious too. FYI: the rice vinegar & cilantro do the taste trick on this recipe.

June 27

Your Share Menu:

Green Leaf Lettuce
Store in a bag in the fridge with a paper towel to absorb any extra moisture

Green & Gold Zucchini
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Red Beets
Store in a bag in the fridge

Sweet Potatoes
Do not refrigerate
Store in a cool dark place

Fresh Herb: Mint, Parsley, or Sage
Store in a sealed bag in the fridge

Mixed Lettuce Greens
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Garlic Scapes
Store in the fridge

Cucumber
Store in the fridge

Swiss Chard
Store in a sealed bag in the fridge

Black Raspberries - Full Share gets covered 1st
Sore in the fridge. Eat ASAP

Red Beets bleed with health boosting nutrients! They are loaded with vitamin C, folate, and potassium fiber. You can store beets in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to 3 weeks. When preparing them, first rinse and scrub the dirt, then trim the stems to one-inch-long (otherwise the color will bleed when they are cooked). Place them in a pot and just barely cover with cold water. Bring to a boil and simmer until tender (approximately 25-40 minutes, less, depending on size.) Drain; allow to cool to room temperature. With a paring knife, slip off the skins, slice, chop, or leave whole. Cooked beets are also good cold -added to salad or you can peel and shred to make a raw beet salad.

Our fresh mint is ready just in time for some 4th of July mojitos. Mint can be added to any drink, dessert, or salad for a refreshing taste combination. Mint has been known to cure stomach aches and cramps by naturally relaxing the digestive-tract muscles in the body. Add a tablespoon of fresh mint to hot water for an ancient healer. Mint is very easy to grow at home and is "fool-proof" as it flourishes in the shade or sun. It is a perennial that can easily become invasive – so be careful where you plant it. You can place the stems of mint in a cup of water and produce roots to replant into your own pot. Craving fresh iced tea yet?

Zucchini, like all squash, has its ancestry in the Americas. However, the varieties of squash that most of us eat today were developed in Italy many generations after their introduction from the Americas. Zucchini comes from the Italian word Zucca which means pumpkin. It is very prevalent in Italian, German, and American cuisine. If you do any traveling to France or the U.K., look for dishes with courgette – an alternative word for zucchini in that area of Europe. One average-size zucchini is equivalent to only 18 food calories! Not to mention an abundancy of potassium and pro-vitamin A.

On the horizon:
Our greenhouse tomato crop is quickly turning from green to pink, meaning red ripened tomatoes will be appearing in your CSA shares soon! The beautiful black and purple eggplants are flowering and beginning to produce tiny "eggs." All of the onions, shallots, and garlic are enjoying the dry weather and getting bigger in the ground every week. Hot peppers have begun to take form and the outdoor tomatoes and cucumbers are standing tall! Corn is growing inches by the day along with our melon crop. The flower and herb gardens have "popped" and are attracting our precious pollinators around the farm. Thyme, oregano, and more basil is soon on its way to you! We have been busy clearing and cleaning out most of our greenhouse crops as we transition into full outdoor growing capabilities until late October. Bigger boxes each week – get ready for the summer bounty!

Khaya's Korner: My Interests

One of my top interests is gymnastics. I really want a real set of uneven bars and a professional mat, but I'm going to have to work to earn money for them. So, every other day, I get paid to work mid-day to lunch with my dad at the farm. While, I'm more in to gardening, it's totally worth it. I want to pursue my dreams and go to the Olympics one day. If I want to do that, I have to work toward my goal by practicing as much as I can. Plus, I like working at the farm. It is a way to exercise and get stronger.
So, this summer, pursue your dream, and reach for the gold! ~Khaya

HARVARD BEETS
2 cups of cooked diced beets
5 T red wine vinegar
2 t cornstarch
fresh pepper to taste
1 / 2 cup sugar
1 / 4 cup orange juice
1 / 2 t salt
1 T butter
Combine the sugar, vinegar, orange juice, cornstarch, salt, and pepper in a heavy sauce. Whisk well and bring to a boil over medium heat, whisking constantly until mixture is clear and thick (approx. 4-5 min.). Whisk in the butter, pour the sauce over the beets, and toss. Serve hot or at room temperature. May be refrigerated and warmed to room temp for make ahead prep.

Farmer Mike's Zucchini Crab cakes
4 C zucchini grated, do not peel
1 / 2 C Parmesan cheese
2 C Italian seasoned breadcrumbs
2 - 3 t Old Bay seasoning
1 T mayonnaise
4 eggs
1 T onion, minced
2 cloves garlic, minced
Mix all ingredients together. Form into patties. If too moist, keep adding breadcrumbs until they can be formed without too much stickiness. Then coat each side of the cakes with breadcrumbs and fry in hot oil until browned and then flip and fry the other side. Top with a slice of your favorite cheese and serve on a bun with tomato and lettuce.

Chocolate Chip Zucchini Loaf
2 and 1 / 2 cups flour
1 / 2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
1 and 1 / 2 tsp. Baking powder
1 tsp. Baking soda
1 tsp. Cinnamon
3 / 4 tsp. Salt
1 C Sugar
3 / 4 cup egg substitute or 3 large eggs
1 / 2 cup unsweetened applesauce
1 / 3 cup vegetable oil
2 tsp. Vanilla
2 cups packed, grated zucchini
1 / 2 cup mini- chocolate chips
Preheat oven to 350. Spray two 8x4-inch loaf pans with oil. Set aside. In a large bowl combine flour, cocoa, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon and salt. Set aside. In a medium bowl whisk together sugar, egg substitute, applesauce, oil, and vanilla. Stir in zucchini. Add wet ingredients to dry ingredients and stir until moistened. Fold in chocolate chips. Place in prepared pans and bake for 50 minutes, or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool for 5 minutes in pan, and then remove.

June 20th

This week's projected CSA harvest:

Green & Gold Zucchini
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Cabbage
Store in the fridge

Green Leaf Lettuce
Store in a bag in the fridge with a paper towel to absorb any extra moisture

Basil
Do Not Refrigerate
Store on a counter out of direct sunlight

Cucumber
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Sweet Potatoes
Do not refrigerate
Store in a cool dark place

Mixed Lettuce Greens
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Garlic Scapes
Store in the fridge

Kale
Store in a sealed bag in the fridge

Our first zucchini/squash harvest of the year! And what a great kick-off to the official start of summer. New and heavier summer produce is beginning to appear in your boxes each week and we are thrilled to have such ideal growing weather for most of June. Zucchini is a type of summer squash that should be served cooked and can be prepared using a variety of techniques: steamed, boiled, grilled, stuffed and baked, barbecued, fried, or incorporated in other recipes such as soufflés. It also can be baked into a bread similar to banana bread or incorporated into a cake mix. You will certainly see your fair share of zucchini over the next few months so get ready to experiment and develop your favorite ways to prepare this summertime treat. We grow 2 very similar varieties of zucchini- the standard dark green and a hybrid golden yellow/orange. Both can grow up to a meter in length with the same plant yielding squash every other day in-season. Fun fact: we have an average of 58,000 zucchini plants growing that are all planted in waves to yield over the course of the summer season. We plant zucchini every 3 weeks from the end of April until the end of June. Sounds like a lot – but this is what it takes to sustainably "pay the bills" in zucchini!

Garlic Scapes are the tops of the actual garlic plant that is growing in the fields. Just like a scallion/spring onion, you can use the entire green stem minced as garlic in any recipe. For those of us who crave the amazing taste and strength of garlic and cannot wait any longer for the fresh cloves to be dug up in late July - here is some relief! Garlic scapes make an excellent pesto (recipe on the back) and go deliciously with this week's zucchini, cabbage, and basil. I recommend to chop finely in recipes.

Green Cabbage is very healthy for you! It is very low in Saturated Fat and Cholesterol. Cabbage's long list of qualities include: a good source of Thiamin, Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, Phosphorus and Potassium. It is also loaded with dietary fiber, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, Vitamin B6, Folate and Manganese. Cabbage can be enjoyed raw, steamed, sautéed, baked, or pickled. It can store in the fridge for a long time – simply strip the outer leaves if they are beginning to turn and underneath you will find another great layer of cabbage waiting.

Basil is commonly used fresh in recipes, added at the last moment to maintain freshness. Basil does best stored at room temperature and should be used, like all fresh herbs, as soon as possible. It will last two to four days. Add whole leaves to minestrone or a tomato-and-mozzarella salad. It is also a good source of protein, Vitamin E, Riboflavin, and Niacin, Potassium, Zinc, and Copper. We grow both green and purple basil, so you may see a blend!

Khaya's Korner:

Summertime
What do you like to do in the summertime? I like to lie around, read a good book, and eat my favorite fruit or veggie from the farm. Also, I like to bake desserts, like cakes or pies. The other night, I helped my mom make strawberry shortcake. It was delicious! Also, summertime is a good time for making fruit salad with strawberries, raspberries, pineapple, and grapes in it. Sometimes in the summertime, my brother and I like to run a lemonade stand with lemonade, chocolate chip cookies, and buttered popcorn each for $1. I'm sorry if I'm making you hungry, because this food is really delicious. So, in the summertime, go, eat some delicious food, and read a good book. Have a great summer, and stay healthy ~ Khaya

Mediterranean Crunch Salad submitted by CSA member Andrea Jack
1 (15-ounce) can no-salt-added garbanzo beans, drained
1 cucumber, chopped
 cup small broccoli florets
1 cup grape tomatoes, halved
1 cup finely sliced kale, tough stems removed
1 / 2 cup finely chopped red onion
2 tablespoons finely chopped Kalamata olives
3 tablespoons red wine vinegar
1 clove garlic, minced
1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley
1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme
Combine all ingredients in a large bowl. Chill at least 1 hour before serving.
Great with balsamic vinaigrette and feta cheese!

Easy Zucchini Noodles
**Need zucchini noodle maker.
RECIPE: Make noodles (there are no ingredients in these except zucchini). MAKE or purchase some pesto. Bring salted water to a boil and quickly blanch zucchini noodles. Drain and return to the same hot pot. Spoon in pesto and toss/stir until noodles are coated. Season as desired. Serve hot pest zucchini noodles with freshly grated cheese.

Garlic Scape Pesto
1 / 4 cup toasted pine nuts, sunflower seeds, or walnuts
3 / 4 cup coarsely chopped garlic scapes*
Juice and zest of 1 / 2 lemon
1 / 2 teaspoon salt
1 / 2 cup extra virgin olive oil
1 / 4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
*Or use half scapes and half herbs such as basil, dill and oregano
Combine the scapes, pine nuts, lemon juice
and zest, salt, and pepper in the bowl of a food processor. Pulse about
20 times, until fairly well combined. Pour in the olive oil slowly through
the feed tube while the motor is running. When the oil is incorporated,
transfer the pesto to a bowl and stir in the grated cheese. Store in an
air-tight jar in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks or freeze. Pesto is
wonderful on bread, sandwiches, pasta, focaccia, or on meat such as
chicken and fish. (makes about 1 cup)

Italian Cabbage Casserole
1 medium head cabbage – coarsely shredded, 1 lb lean ground beef, 1 large onion
1 can (14oz) diced tomatoes – undrained, 1 can tomato sauce, 3 Tbsp tomato paste
1 and 1 / 2 tsp dried oregano
1 / 2 tsp garlic powder
1 / 2 tsp pepper
1 / 8 tsp salt
1 / 2 cup shredded mozzarella
Place cabbage in a steamer basket, place over 1" water. Bring to a boil, cover & steam 6-8 minutes until tender. Drain & set aside.
Fry beef, onion & green pepper in large skillet. Add all other ingredients (no cheese) to beef to make the sauce.
Place half of the cabbage in a greased baking dish. Pour 1 / 2 of the meat sauce over cabbage, add the rest of the cabbage and meat sauce, top with cheese. Bake uncovered in a 350 F oven for 15-20 minutes.

June 13th

This week's projected CSA menu:

Strawberries
Store in the fridge

Sugar Snap Peas
Store in the fridge

Red Leaf Lettuce
Store in a bag in the fridge with a paper towel to absorb any extra moisture

Cilantro
Store in a sealed bag in the fridge

Red Beets
Cut the tops and store both in the fridge separately

Sweet Potatoes
Do not refrigerate

Mixed Lettuce Greens
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Japanese White Turnips
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

It's strawberry season now! We hope you are all enjoying the very delayed, yet worth the wait, luscious fruit. The two varieties we are growing this year are called Galletta and AC Valley Sunset. Although Pennsylvania isn't known as a good strawberry producing state, the weather lately has proven otherwise. Strawberries like it hot and dry. The lack of rain recently mixed with constant dry winds has provided the perfect climate for strawberry plants. When the weather is like this, we need to pick our strawberry field every 2 days to keep up with the fast-ripening fruit. If we were to experience a lot of rain during strawberry season, the delicate berries would rot as they ripen. Thankfully, it looks like we have a great week ahead of us for harvesting.

We have been irrigating around the clock lately with the dehydrating winds that do not seem to let up- even overnight. At the advice of a hydrologist, we dug an irrigation well about 20 years ago that we have yet to regret. Our farm is watered with one 300 gallons per minute capacity well. Of course, we cannot water all the fields at once due to water pressure, so we must prioritize what crops get turned on (and when). We do some overhead irrigating but most of our fields are watered using drip irrigation. Drip tape is laid along each row as it is planted for a more efficient watering system that does not evaporate and allows the water to go exactly where we need it to the root system.

"Pain staking / tomato staking" but it's got to be done! Once a tomato plant reaches about 1-2 feet in height, it will begin to droop over and it is our job as farmers to provide support for this plant to grow successfully-vertically. We have been busy putting stakes in the ground and stringing up All of our tomato plants in efforts to bring on a great crop coming in early July till the end of October. I can personally testify that this is one of the hardest jobs on the farm but it's got to be done.

New this year, we are also growing cucumbers vertically in a large greenhouse. All of the cucumbers you have been seeing randomly have been coming from this indoor trial. The plants are now 16 feet tall, vined and trellised vertically for maximum greenhouse space and use.

Khaya's Korner

"The Mule"
The Kawasaki Mule is what we use to get around on the farm. The "Mule" is an ATV, which stands for All Terrain Vehicle. We use the Mule to carry tanbark from one place to another to mulch our fast growing garden. We also use another vehicle called the four-wheeler for checking the irrigation pipes. These vehicles are very important because they help us get daily jobs done much faster. Instead of sprinting up hills when you forget to water the plants, you can simply hop on the four- wheeler or Mule, hit the gas, and go. It takes a much shorter time to get many tasks done. The farm would not be in such good condition if it weren't for the Mule and the four- wheeler. So, if you live on a farm and want to get a job done fast, use a Mule.
~ Khaya

STEAMED BEET GREENS
6-8 cups loosely packed beet greens, 4 T butter, 6 T finely chopped onions, 3T lemon juice
freshly ground pepper and salt to taste
Rinse the beet greens well and leave the water clinging to the leaves. Melt the butter in a skillet. Add the greens and lemon juice; cover, and cook for 5 min. Add the onions and seasonings, stir well, cover, and cook until the greens are wilted (approx. 4 min.). Serve immediately.

Oven Roasted Veggie Chips
1 Medium beet, 2 Parsnips, 1 Turnip, Coconut oil melted, salt
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Peel veggies and slice 1 / 16th of an inch thick with a very sharp knife, the thinner the better. In a mixing bowl, toss veggies with coconut oil. Line baking sheets with parchment paper and then arrange a single layer and sprinkle with salt. You may have to cook a few batches. Bake for 20 minutes or until the edges start to dry out, turn them over and bake an additional 20 minutes. As the beets cook they will become lighter in color. Transfer to a wire rack and let cool, the chips get crispy when cold.

Shredded Beet Carrot Salad ** turnips are great shredded raw on salads as well!
1 Bunch Beets, 6 Medium Carrots, 3 Cups Cabbage, Your favorite dressing
Peel and shred carrots and beets. Shred cabbage. Steam each ingredient separately or in layers of a steamer until barely tender, about 5 minutes. Allow to cool to room temperature, plate and dress with your favorite dressing. Serves 4-6

Caramelized Turnips
3 cups diced peeled turnips, 1 / 4 cup water, 1 cube chicken bouillon
1 tablespoon butter, or more as needed
2 tablespoons white sugar
Place the turnips into a skillet with the water and chicken bouillon cube over medium heat, and simmer until the water has evaporated and the turnips are tender, about 15 minutes. Stir in the butter, let melt, and sprinkle on the sugar. Gently cook and stir the turnips until the butter and sugar cook into a brown, sticky coating on the turnips, about 10 minutes. Serve hot.

Lemony Chicken Noodle Soup with cilantro and ginger
1 lemon
1 / 4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
1 tsp. finely grated fresh ginger
2 serrano chilies, stemmed, halved, and seeded
6 cups homemade or canned low-salt chicken broth
4 oz. fresh Chinese egg noodles (look in the produce section of your supermarket)
2 Tbs. fish sauce (preferably Thai Kitchen brand); more to taste
1 boneless, skinless chicken breast half, cut into 1 / 4-inch-thick slices (this is easier if the chicken is partially frozen)
Fish sauce varies in its saltiness from brand to brand. So it's a good idea to prepare the soup with the modest amount specified in this recipe, and then at serving time, pass around the fish sauce so people can season their portions with a touch more if they wish.

SWEET POTATO BUTTER
2 Garlic cloves, 2 Sweet Potatoes, Fine Sea Salt and pepper to taste
2 medium Carrots, 2 Tablespoons chopped Parsley
1 / 2 to 3 / 4 Cup Vegetable broth
2 Tablespoons chopped Cilantro (Optional)
1 Tablespoon extra-virgin Olive Oil
Put unpeeled garlic cloves on aluminum foil and bake at 350 degrees F. in oven or toaster oven for about 10 minutes, until soft.
Microwave or boil unpeeled potatoes until done. Peel carrots, cut into large chunks and microwave or boil until soft.
Drain carrots, peel potatoes and put both in a food processor. Squeeze in the baked garlic. Add 1 / 2 cup broth and blend. With motor running, add oil and keep blending, adding more broth until puree is fairly smooth and full.
Add salt and pepper to taste. Dip can be made as long as a day in advance, covered and refrigerated. Bring to room temperature for serving and stir in the optional herbs right before serving with raw vegetables and bread sticks.

First week of Summer Shares June 6th

This week's projected CSA menu:

Strawberries
Store in the fridge

Snow Peas
Store in the fridge

Green Leaf Lettuce
Store in a bag in the fridge with a paper towel to absorb any extra moisture

Italian Parsley
Store in a sealed bag in the fridge

Kale
Store in a sealed bag in the fridge

Sweet Potatoes
Do not refrigerate

Baby Spinach or Mixed Lettuce Greens
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Yukon Gold Potatoes Full Share only
Keep in a cool dark place in the bag provided in a cabinet or under the sink

Fennel Leaf
Store in a sealed bag in the fridge

Open Farm Day is CANCELLED for this Saturday June 11

Notice from Mike and Terra Brownback:

Due to a later than usual strawberry harvest season for us this year, we are cancelling this week's open farm day. We are unable to postpone this event. We cannot in good conscience open up our strawberry fields for pick-your-own before we have provided strawberries for the entire membership. This is a stressful and painful decision for the Spiral Path Farm team but we would rather let you all know the facts before you finalize your plans to visit the farm. We regret the colder weather earlier in the spring, just as we were removing the straw mulch cover which protected the crop over winter. That cooler spring has delayed our strawberry harvest, but in farming, one cannot escape the facts. Choosing an open farm day date well in advance is always tricky and necessary for us to put on an event. We have been fairly lucky to have gotten it right over the years but NOT this time.
We will be harvesting strawberries as they ripen and you will see them in your CSA box as they come in from the field.
"Blessings to all" ~ Thanks for understanding farm facts...
Mike and Terra Brownback and family

Italian Parsley is possibly the world's most popular herb. This flat leaf herb derives its name from the Greek word meaning "rock celery." It is a biennial plant that will return to the garden year after year once it is established. In addition to its widespread use as a garnish, parsley offers numerous health benefits as it contains two types of unusual components that provide unique health benefits. The first type is volatile oil components and the second type is flavonoids. It is also a good source of antioxidants, folic acid, vitamin C, and vitamin A. Proclaimed health benefits include anti-inflammatory properties and a boosted immune system. You can combine chopped parsley, garlic, and lemon zest and use it as a rub for chicken, lamb, and beef. Use parsley in soups and tomato sauces. Add parsley to pesto sauce to add more texture to its green color. Chopped parsley can be sprinkled on a host of different recipes, including salads, vegetable sautés and grilled fish. Serve a colorful salad of fennel, orange, cherry tomatoes, pumpkin seeds and parsley leaves. Fresh parsley should be kept in the refrigerator in a plastic bag. If the parsley is slightly wilted, either sprinkle it lightly with some water or wash it without completely drying it before storing in the refrigerator. If you have excess flat leaf parsley, you can easily dry it by laying it out in a single layer on a clean kitchen cloth. Once dried, it should be kept in a tightly sealed container in a cool, dark and dry place. Get ready to enjoy this fresh herb often – we also grow curly parsley as well that is soon to come!

Kale Chips ~~From member Kelly Paul
Kale
Olive Oil
Pinch of Salt
-Remove tough stems from kale, then tear leaves into chip-size pieces.
-Place kale pieces in a bowl & toss with a bit of olive oil, just enough to lightly coat the leaves.
-Arrange chips on a baking sheet in a single layer, sprinkle with just a bit of salt, according to personal taste.
-Bake at 275 degrees for about 20-25 minutes or until chips are crispy, turning once halfway through.
-Dip in your favorite chip dip or just eat plain. These are so easy & delicious, especially if you have picky eaters in the house who don't usually eat kale. Enjoy!

Sweet Potato Quesadillas
1 and 1 / 2 cup onion
2 cloves garlic
Sauté in large frypan in 1 tbsp. oil until translucent.
2 tsp dried oregano
1 and 1 / 2 tsp each dried basil, marjoram, chili powder
1 and 1 / 2 tsp ground cumin
pinch of ground red pepper or to taste
Add and cook another minute.
4 cups sweet potatoes (cooked and mashed)
Add and heat through, frequently stirring to prevent sticking. Add salt and pepper to taste.
8 tortillas
1 cup cheddar cheese (shredded)
Spread about 1 / 2 cup filling and 2 tbsp cheese on half of each tortilla, leaving a ½" border on the sides. Fold tortilla in half. Place on oiled baking sheets. Brush tops with oil. Bake in preheated oven at 400F until brown, 15-20 minutes.

Italian Parsley Pesto with Pasta
Ingredients
1 / 2 pound spaghetti
Kosher salt
1 / 2 cup unsalted, roasted almonds
2 cups (packed) fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves
1 / 2 cup chopped fresh chives
1 / 3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 / 4 cup finely grated Parmesan
Freshly ground black pepper
Preparation
Cook pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water, stirring occasionally, until al dente. Drain, reserving 2 cups pasta cooking liquid.
Meanwhile, pulse almonds in a food processor until smooth. Add parsley, chives, oil, and Parmesan; process until smooth. Season pesto with salt and pepper.
Toss pasta and pesto in a large bowl, adding pasta cooking liquid by 1 / 4-cupfuls until saucy. Season with salt and pepper.
DO AHEAD: Pesto can be made 5 days ahead. Cover surface directly; chill.

Stir Fry Snow Peas in Curry by Beverly Crow
Mix together to make curry: 1 tsp Cumin, 1 and 1 / 2 tsp Curry, 1 tsp Oregano, 2 – 3 cloves of Garlic (crushed), lemon juice (squeeze half a lemon), 1 / 3 cup of soy sauce, 1 Tbsp cooking oil. Stir mixture well and pour over chicken, beef, or tofu. (beef tips or chicken can be whole thighs or breast or diced). Bake at 350 degrees for 45-50 minutes.
Stir fry chopped onions, garlic, carrots, and celery in a 1 / 4 cup of olive oil. Add entire pint of snow peas with the tops cut off and sauté for 5 minutes max or until snow peas are bright green (still a little crunchy). Stir in baked meat or tofu and enjoy over cooked rice! Basmati is our favorite...

Week of May 30th

This week's Tentative CSA harvest menu:

Rhubarb Full Share Only
Use the SPF bag to wrap stems tightly within and store in the fridge

Snow Peas
Store in the fridge

Red Leaf Lettuce
Store in a bag in the fridge with a paper towel to absorb any extra moisture

Cilantro
Store in a sealed bag in the fridge

Swiss Chard
Store in a sealed bag in the fridge

Cucumber - Full Share only most likely
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Baby Spinach
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Yukon Gold Potatoes
Keep in a cool dark place in the bag provided in a cabinet or under the sink

Turnips
Store in the veg drawer in a sealed bag

Dill
Store in a sealed bag in the fridge

OPEN FARM DAY is next Saturday, June 11th 9am to 3pm

Make the drive to see where all of your produce is coming from!
For Members only: Pick Your Own Strawberries for $3.50 / quart ends at 12pm
The L.E.A.F. Project will be here providing organic food and drinks for sale
More details and the invitation will be sent out in next week's CSA shares

Most of our crops have doubled in size from the scorching sun in just a short week. The tomato and pepper plants are beginning to flower. The zucchini and cucumbers are happy along with the onions and garlic in the ground. We are back at irrigating every day to ensure our plants are well hydrated. Did you know that it is better to water plants in the late evening opposed to the middle of the day when it is the hottest? Plants can go into shock from such extreme changes, so we try to get everything nice and wet before dark so that the plants are happy and cooled off all night away from the sun and evaporation. Summer is officially here on the farm as far as temperature and new things coming on each week. This week, it's snow peas -and "the best tasting we've ever grown," says Will. Sugar snap peas will be coming next! Over the Memorial Day weekend, our berry scouts, Khaya and Jonas, were hunting in the strawberry fields for the color red. We are now officially seeing completely ripened fruit on the plants, but only a total of 6 berries in the entire field that were quickly devoured. The sun, no doubt, will bring on the berries for next weekend's event and your share boxes of course for several weeks to come.

Snow Peas- They are a once a year treat in June that you typically see in Asian cuisine and stir-fries. Snap off the ends, do not shell. Chop them raw in a salad or... Keep them whole and sauté or steam for 1 – 2 minutes only, until they are bright green (keeping their firmness). Snow peas are rich in Vitamin C and protein.

Japanese White Turnips- This variety of turnip is exceptionally sweeter than most. We prefer it for its crisp white flesh and juicy sweet interior. No skin – so no need to peel! There are so many ways to prepare turnips: boil, bake, roast, grill, shredded raw on salads...

Dill Comes from the same family as celery. Amazing flavor! Add it to potatoes, fish, meat, soups, salads. A little bit goes a long way, just snip it raw right on top of your favorite dish. Dill added to sour cream is the basis for most dressings around the world. Check out the potato salad recipe on the back!

Cucumbers A mini greenhouse trial this year that we all are surely enjoying with the salad greens. So many more to come from the outside fields for months! Let us know what you think of the trial.

Crispy Turnip Fries
Turnips 1 tbsp olive oil
1 / 4 cup grated parmesan cheese
1 / 2 tsp garlic salt 1 / 2 tsp paprika
1 / 2 tsp onion powder
Preheat oven to 425 degrees F (220 degrees C). Line a baking sheet with a piece of aluminum foil and lightly grease. Peel the turnips, and cut into French fry-sized sticks. Place into a large bowl, and toss with the olive oil to coat. Place the Parmesan cheese, garlic salt, paprika, onion powder in a re-sealable plastic bag, and shake to mix. Place the oiled turnips into the bag, and shake until evenly coated with the spices. Spread out onto the prepared baking sheet. Bake in preheated oven until the outside is crispy, and the inside is tender, about 20 minutes. Serve immediately.

Chard Lentil Soup
1 and 1 / 2 C lentils
1 bunch Swiss Chard, chopped
1 / 2 C olive oil
3-4 cloves garlic
Salt, freshly ground pepper
3 / 4 C chopped onion
1 rib celery, chopped
3 / 4 C lemon juice
Put lentils in pot and cover with water and cook covered till tender, about 45 minutes. Add chard and 1 C water, cook until the chard is wilted. Sauté onion, garlic, celery, and 1 / 2 t salt in olive oil. Add to the lentils. Add lemon juice and stir into the soup. Taste and correct seasoning. Serve with crusty French bread. Suggested toppings for the soup bowl: chopped tomatoes and parsley, sour cream/yogurt, your favorite herbs.

Tzatziki, a traditional Greek Salad from member Yvonne Milspaw
1 cucumber, peeled and chopped fine
1 cup plain yogurt
1 / 2-1 teaspoon garlic powder, or finely chopped garlic clove
1 / 2 tsp dried dill or mint
1 -2 tsp olive oil
1 tsp vinegar
dash salt if needed
Mix well. A very cool and refreshing salad that is good with grilled meats

Potato Salad
1 C. Mayonnaise 4 C cubed potatoes
1 T. white vinegar 1 T balsamic vinegar
1 C chopped raw green beans or cucumber with skins (for crunch) cut bit-size pieces
3 / 4 tsp salt 1 / 2 C minced fresh sweet onion / spring onion
1 / 4 tsp pepper 2 hardboiled eggs, chopped
1 tsp sugar
1 T minced fresh dill
In a large pot, barely cover potatoes (whole with skins) with water. Bring to a boil and then turn to simmer and cook only until just cooked through; insert a small knife. You want them to be firm. Drain in a colander and allow to cool to very warm/warm. Cube with skins into bite size pieces. Prepare the dressing: whisk the vinegars, salt, pepper, sugar, mayonnaise. Pour over warm potatoes. Add the vegetables and eggs and toss gently. Potato salad is at its best at room temperature. *recipe may be cut in half or doubled*

Week of May 23rd

Our Projected CSA Menu:

Rhubarb
Use the SPF bag to wrap stems tightly within and store in the fridge

Spinach
Keep in a bag in the fridge
Do not wash until using

Asparagus (Full Share Only)
Store in a sealed bag in the fridge

Spring Onions
Trim roots and tops and store in a bag in the veg drawer

Green Leaf Lettuce
Store in a bag in the fridge with a paper towel to absorb any extra moisture

Baby Spinach
Store bag in the veg drawer of the fridge

Kale
Keep in a bag in the fridge

Yukon Gold Potatoes
Keep in a cool dark place in the bag provided in a cabinet or under the sink

How's the weather impacting the farm?
The misty rain over the weekend totaled to a little less than an inch in the rain gage on the farm. The ground being too soggy has not been a problem for us so far this year and it, in fact, has made for easier planting of our summer crops. All of our bunching greens like spinach and kale are loving these wet days in May and are thriving this year because of it. So, enjoy all the spinach you can get now because it will not be around again until fall. More problematic has been the reoccurring cloudy days. Our zucchini and tomato plants are very happy to see a hot and sunny forecast for this on-coming week. Like most of the mid-Atlantic, these plants have been impatiently waiting for a little sunlight! There is one type of vegetable that prefers a cloudy, wet environment – specifically low 60s; Head Lettuce. Most of the head lettuce in the U.S. is grown in a county in California that has a median temperature of 64 degrees all year long.

Rhubarb is in! All the stalks you receive are ripe and ready to use.
** The leaves of rhubarb are poisonous and should be chopped off if any still remain. Rhubarb has a tart flavor and typically is made into a syrup for baking. Check out the awesome recipe on the back! There are many different varieties that range in color from green to deep red. Rhubarb is a hearty perennial to our northern climate and will survive through the harshest of winters. When you plant rhubarb initially, it takes 3 years for the stalks to be the ideal size. After that, you can harvest continuously for up to 25 years! We are now on our third year of harvesting and have been planting more and more each season to help establish the patch. The goal is to successfully grow enough for all of our members to receive each week during the popular rhubarb season. Like most treats, their season is short but sweet. If you would like to hold your rhubarb to pair with our soon-to-come strawberries, you can easily chop it in to 1 inch segments and freeze in a sealed bag.

Your CSA dollars at work: We donate $1 from every CSA membership to go towards The Arias Brownback Memorial Scholarship Fund that assists in sending young farmers to the annual PASA conference in State College. Last year, the scholarship was able to send over 70 different applicants to this inspiring event. Thanks!

Khaya's Korner
The first thing I do when I get downstairs on a school morning is to pack my lunch. I normally have a peanut butter and jelly sandwich along with pretzels, grapes, and an apple or carrot sticks and ranch. I always have a very healthy lunch with at least a sandwich and a fruit or veggie. It is very easy to pack a good nutritious lunch. If you don't want to be hungry during the day, don't pack junk food. Junk food just gives you a sugar rush for you to burn off. Healthy food's energy lasts much longer than junk food's energy, which means you won't be as hungry. If you pack a lunch in the morning, go healthy! - Khaya

Rhubarb Crisp or Strawberry Rhubarb Crisp
Makes one 9x9" dessert~ double recipe to make a 9" x 13 "pan
Serve with vanilla ice cream, a dollop of fresh cream, or whipped fresh cream
Cook in saucepan over medium heat until it becomes a "mush" about 15 minutes:
2 C chopped Rhubarb (not any of the leaves)
3 / 4 to 1 C raw sugar
1 / 4 C water
Stir in and simmer 1 minute:
1 T cornstarch or arrowroot powder blended with 1 T water-this thicken the mush for pies or crisp recipes
Pour Rhubarb Mush into buttered 9" x 9 "pan. Top with the "Crisp". Bake at 375 degrees for 25 minutes or until bubbly
The Crisp: mix by hand, by rubbing ingredients together until crumbly
1 / 2 C butter
1 / 2 C flour
1 C quick or rolled oats
1 t cinnamon
1 / 2 C sugar
To Make Strawberry Rhubarb Crisp: add 1 C chopped fresh or frozen strawberries-an old fashioned Spring dessert-tart and packed with flavor

CHEESY SPINACH SQUARES
3 Eggs
1 / 2 C flour
1 bunch spinach, chopped fine
1 t minced spring onion
16 oz cottage or ricotta cheese
1 / 2 C shredded cheddar cheese
Ground black pepper and salt to taste
Optional: 4-5 slices fresh tomato
Beat the eggs and flour together in a bowl. Add the spinach, onion, cottage cheese, cheddar cheese, salt and black pepper. Spoon the mixture into a well-greased glass 9x9 dish. Bake covered with foil in the oven at 325 degrees for 30 minutes. Top the spinach dish with sliced tomatoes. Return to oven for another 10 minutes. Let set for another 1 / 2 hour. Sprinkle with parmesan cheese. Delicious!!!

Week of May 16

Your Tentative CSA Share Menu:

Romaine Head
Store in a bag in the fridge with a paper towel to absorb any extra moisture

Spinach
Keep in a bag in the fridge.
Do not wash until using

Tuscan Kale or Collard Greens
Keep in a bag in the fridge

Asparagus (Medium Share Only)
Store in a sealed bag in the veg drawer of the fridge

Spring Onions
Trim roots and tops and store in a bag in the veg drawer

Cilantro
Store in a sealed bag in the fridge

Mixed Greens
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Yukon Gold Potatoes
Keep in a cool dark place in the bag provided in a cabinet or under the sink

Our big summer crops like peppers and tomatoes have officially made their way out of the greenhouse as transplants and into the fields to spread their roots. We typically wait for Mother's Day as an annual date to signify that the weather should be warm enough for these crops to safely survive outside during the cold nights that we will most likely experience throughout the end of May. The flower and herb gardens are filling up more every day in preparations for our Open Farm Days this summer. Our strawberry crop is looking good and will be ready in a couple weeks along with our sugar snap and snow peas. Rhubarb is also growing and on its way shortly to (hopefully) time perfectly with the berries. The spring onions are continuing to grow every week and will eventually become the large common onion bulbs around mid-July. Many herbs are starting to double in size weekly as the wet ground has allowed them to flourish. Cilantro is on the menu this week and is a hearty crop surviving well outside amidst the wind gusts. So many herbs on the horizon: parsley, dill, fennel, and more oregano. This week, you are seeing the first harvest of our beloved head lettuce that is all grown outside and loves this cool wet spring weather. Head lettuce peaks in late May and early June and you will surely get a sample of all 3 varieties that we grow: red leaf, green leaf, and romaine.

Cilantro; love it or hate it but there is no in between! They say that the distaste for cilantro is hereditary. Well, on Spiral Path Farm, we love it and use it often like many Asian, Middle Eastern, and Latin American cuisines. Cilantro is the richest herbal source of vitamin K, which is involved in building bone mass and also in treating Alzheimer's disease. You can easily freeze cilantro whole or chopped in an airtight container but do not thaw before using – it will lose its crisp texture.

Yukon Gold Potatoes are the last of our storage potatoes. Their storing abilities are strong and they have been a wonderful filler in your boxes all spring. We are seeing some black spots on the insides of some of the potatoes once they are cut open – simply cut around and discard. There is no way for us to grade this out beforehand!

Khaya's Korner
Hi everyone, and welcome to Khaya's Korner. My name is Khaya and I am 10 years old, 11 in August. My grandma and grandpa: Mike and Terra are the owners of Spiral Path Farm. I am excited because of two things. The first thing is that it's spring, and spring is my favorite season. I love to see all the new life such as breathtaking flowers blooming and pretty greenery emerging from the ground. My favorite day in spring is what my grandma calls "leaf pop-up day". That is the day where all the luscious new leaves appear on trees. It seems as if it happens overnight! The second thing I'm excited about is that my brother, Jonas and I get to have our very own flower garden at the farm. We get to choose the bulbs and then plant them. Right now, we have an assortment of lilies, tulips, and crocuses. Also, we have a rosebush, which will bloom later on in the summer. I am very excited to see all our flowers. It will be very beautiful. Goodbye for now, Khaya Brownback

Rice Salad with Cilantro Vinaigrette by CSA member Jill Fritz
2 cups cooked long grain rice
1 can (15 oz) black beans, rinsed and drained
1 / 2 cup diced sweet red pepper
1 / 2 cup diced sweet yellow pepper
4 and 1/ 2 teaspoons minced fresh cilantro
3 tablespoons olive or vegetable oil
2 tablespoons cider or white wine vinegar
2 tablespoons water
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 / 2 teaspoon salt
1 / 2 teaspoon pepper
In a bowl, combine rice, beans, peppers and cilantro. Combine the remaining ingredients in a jar with a tight fitting lid; shake well. Pour over rice mixture and toss to coat. Refrigerate until serving.
Yield: 4-6 servings

Tilapia with Cilantro-Walnut Pesto
1- 3 / 4 cups lightly packed fresh cilantro sprigs
1 / 4 cup plus 1 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil
3 Tbs. toasted chopped walnuts
1 lemon, half squeezed to yield 1- 1 / 2 Tbs. juice, half cut into wedges
1 medium clove garlic
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
4 tilapia or other firm white fish fillets (about 1 lb. total)
2 Tbs. unsalted butter
In a mini food processor or blender, combine the cilantro, 1 / 4 cup of the oil, the walnuts, lemon juice, garlic, 1 / 4 tsp. salt, a few grinds of pepper, and 3 Tbs. water. Process until mostly smooth; set aside.
Pat the fish dry and season with 1 / 2 tsp. salt and 1 / 4 tsp. pepper.
Heat the remaining 1 Tbs. oil and 1 Tbs. of the butter in a 12-inch nonstick skillet over medium heat until the butter melts and its foam subsides. Cook 2 of the fillets, turning once, until browned and just cooked through, about 4 minutes total. Transfer to a platter, cover, and keep warm. Repeat with the remaining fish and 1 Tbs. butter, adjusting the heat as necessary. Serve the fish with the pesto and lemon wedges.

Collards with Mashed Potatoes
Wash potatoes and cut into small pieces to equal 5-6 C, leave the skins on. Barely cover with water and add 1 T salt, bring to a boil and then simmer till tender, about 20-25 minutes. Drain liquid (save for stock). Add 1 / 4 C butter or garlic butter and about 2 C milk (more or less depending on thickness you enjoy). Mash with a mixer. Prepare greens as potatoes cook. Mince 1 onion. Grate 3 carrots. Chop 3-4 cloves garlic. Sauté these in 1 / 4 C olive oil in large deep skillet. Add salt and pepper generously, stir often. Finely slice and then chop one bunch collard greens. Add to sautéed vegetables. Stir and wilt, over high heat. After 10 minutes, add 1 / 2 C water and cover with lid and allow to steam another 10 minutes. Serve the greens aside the mashed potatoes. Salad or cooked squash make a good addition. May add bacon or sausage to this recipe but it is wonderful alone. Can make cheesy mashed potatoes by adding 1 / 2 C Parmesan (or favorite cheese) at the end of mashing.

Kale Salad
Cook chopped kale in boiling water for 3 to 5 minutes; drain and immerse in ice water for 3 to 5 minutes. Spin dry. Dress with a vinaigrette dressing and add sliced or slivered almonds and grated asiago cheese.

Hearty Portuguese Kale Soup (very rich and hearty) By CSA member Katharine Bennett
1 T. olive oil, 1 / 2 lb. smoked sausage sliced 1 / 2" thick, 1 Qt. chicken broth, 1 med. Onion thinly sliced
3 med sliced potatoes, 1 lg bunch kale shredded or sliced very thin
Salt and fresh ground pepper.
Heat oil in a skillet and sauté the sausage just until the fat is rendered, about 3-5 minutes. Drain on paper towels and reserve. Bring broth to a boil with the onions and potatoes; simmer 10-15 min. until potatoes are very tender. Mash onions and potatoes in the broth with a potato masher or slotted spoon. Add drained sausage slices and the kale. Bring to a boil and then simmer for 3-5 minutes, until kale is tender. Taste for seasoning - add salt and pepper as needed and serve hot.

Week of May 9th

Your Share Menu:

Asparagus * Full Share Only this week (most likely)
Store in a sealed bag in the fridge

Broccoli * Medum Share Only this week (most likely)
Keep in a bag in the fridge

Swiss Chard
Keep in a bag in the fridge. Do not wash until using

Spring Onions
Trim roots and tops and store in a bag in the veg drawer

French Breakfast Radishes
Cut the tops off and store separately in a bag in the fridge

Baby Spinach
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Mixed Greens
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Gold Potatoes
Keep in a cool dark place in the bag provided in a cabinet or under the sink

The first Open Farm Day is scheduled for Saturday June 11th ~ Details to come soon

New on the farm this year:

We have been seeding flowering alyssum amongst all of our lettuce flats to protect them in the greenhouses and fields from harmful insects like aphids and white flies. Each flat of 200 lettuce seedlings has one cell of alyssum growing in the corner as its security guard/banker plant. Flowering alyssum naturally attracts a beneficial insect called Orius and also provides pollen (food) for this predatory bug. Aphids are also attracted to the alyssum, which is a delicious meal for the Orius.
Marigolds are also a big help on our farm and are often planted at the ends of each field. Like alyssum, the flowering "hero yellow" marigolds provide pollen and attract thrips (food for the predatory bugs) as well as the ability to sustain predatory mites. The goal is to get the harmful and unwanted insects away from the vegetables and onto these plants to feed instead. We also want to successfully maintain the ecology on our farm and this is the most humane and organic approach in agriculture; entomology through IPM (Integrated Pest Management)! Not to mention the delightful aroma of these flowers and their beauty added to the landscape of the farm and produce fields is a win-win.

Swiss Chard is a member of the beet and spinach family. Chard has a slightly bitter taste when used fresh, so cooking with the large leaves is recommended as the bitterness fades leaving a refined flavor which is more delicate than that of cooked spinach. Swiss chard has an impressive list of health-promoting nutrients: vitamins C, E, and K, carotenes, chlorophyll, and fiber. It is also an excellent source of several minerals including potassium, magnesium, iron, and manganese. Chard is loaded with vitamin B6, protein, calcium, thiamine, selenium, zinc, niacin, and folic acid. It is one of the most powerful anti-cancer foods due to its combination of traditional nutrients; phytochemicals, chlorophyll, other plant pigments, and soluble fiber. The generous amount of vitamin K that is contained in Swiss chard is especially beneficial in the maintenance of bone health. Some ways to use Swiss chard: toss penne pasta with olive oil, lemon juice, garlic, and cooked Swiss chard. Add zest to omelets and frittatas by adding some boiled Swiss chard. Use chard in place of or in addition to spinach when preparing vegetarian lasagna.

Radishes are looking good inside the ground but their exposed greens on top are another story... As you can see, the bugs are really enjoying the radish greens. No problem and no harm to you other than the physical appearance of the leaves and absolute proof that we do not spray for insects. You can still cut off the greens, wash, and use them in a soup. A shaved radish makes a good crunch on a sandwich. We are very happy though to see that we are not having too much trouble with an underground mole/vole problem-yet. Root veggies are always at risk. Did you know that one radish contains more potassium than an entire bunch of bananas?!

Greens & Beans
3 C cooked black-eyed peas, garbanzo, or your choice
1 t thyme
3 T olive oil
2-3 bay leaves
1 large onion, chopped
large bunch Swiss chard, kale, or other greens
3 cloves garlic
salt & pepper
Heat oil in skillet, add onions and garlic, sauté with thyme and bay leaves. Add the beans
and chopped greens, cook 1 / 2 hour on low. Season with salt and pepper. Remove bay
bay leaves. 8-10 servings.

Swiss Chard & Potatoes
1 bunch red or green Swiss chard, (chopped fine and use the ribs)
1 large onion chopped,
4 garlic cloves- minced,
1 - 2 green pepper, diced,
1 / 2lb bacon- minced before cooking (bacon optional but oh very yummy),
3 C sliced boiled potatoes,
2 C shredded cheddar cheese
Heat 2 T olive oil in large skillet. Add bacon, onion, garlic, and green pepper stir until veggies are cooked through. Then add the chopped Swiss Chard, stir until it wilts, and then cover pan and let steam for another 5 minutes.
Butter a 9x13 pan and cover bottom with 1 / 2 chard mix. Then layer with 1 / 2 potatoes and 1 / 2 cheese.
Top this with the second layer and finish with cheese. Bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes.

Cooked Spinach Salad
Ingredients: spinach, 1 T lemon juice, 3 T Olive oil, Salt, 1 Clove garlic, 1 cup Plain yogurt
Fresh mint; parsley or chives, Pepper, and Chick peas if desired
Step 1: Wash the spinach well and either steam it or cook it in just the water clinging to it. Drain thoroughly and leave to cool.
Step 2: Chop the cooled spinach and put it into a bowl with the lemon juice, olive oil, and some salt and pepper, tossing it gently so that the oil and lemon juice are well distributed.
Step 3: Peel and crush the garlic and then mix it with the yogurt.
Put the spinach salad onto a flat plate and spoon some of the yogurt mixture on top; garnish with chopped green herbs. Serve the rest of the yogurt separate

Blackened Asparagus
Cut asparagus into 2" segments
4 tbsp butter
1 / 2 tsp salt
pinch of black pepper
Melt butter on high heat in a heavy skillet (cast iron is best) on high heat, allow to brown slightly. Add asparagus & seasonings all at once. Stir often over high heat, till asparagus begins to blacken, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat before asparagus gets soft. Drizzle with balsamic dressing and enjoy....Yum!!

week of May 2nd Delivery 4

This week's *projected CSA harvest menu:

Baby Arugula

Store in the veg drawer in the fridge

French Breakfast Radishes

Store bag in the fridge

Spring Onions

Trim roots and tops and store in a bag in the veg drawer

Broccoli * Full Shares Only/ Or if you are not receiving Asparagus

Store in the fridge in a sealed bag

Kale

Store in a bag in the veg drawer away from moisture

Yellow Onion ** Full Share Only

Does not need refrigerated

Oregano

Store Fresh: sealed bag in the fridge
To Dry: see newsletter instructions

Gold Potatoes

Keep in a cool dark place in the bag provided in a cabinet or under the sink

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What's new in the Bee Yard: an update from our Beekeeper, Scott Kingsley

"It's been a heck of a two weeks for the bee yard. First of all, the bees that we bought this year and were installed two weekends ago are doing really well, laying up honey and pollen with both queens laying lots of eggs. Our latest log hive is also flourishing, although they have a cranky disposition; both times I worked with them they stung me. The first log hive is calm and never aggressive.
We recently added to our total colony count due to a late afternoon call from a fellow in local Landisburg. Long story short; he had a swarm about twice the size of a rugby ball in a tree they had cut down yesterday. The swarm was about 15 feet in the tree. With a ladder and a potato chip box later, about 98% of the bees were captured. I transferred them into hive body 163 this evening on the farm. Now it's a waiting game to see if they'll stay and if I caught the queen without injury, we should know by the week's end. Total count: two domestic hives, two wild log colonies, and one captured swarm. I'm psyched!"
After the long winter, our bees were in need of some TLC to boost their immune systems. Scott began feeding them our "Magic Bee Syrup" that consisted of sugar, water, honey, and essential oils: lavender, thyme, and peppermint. It seems to have helped! Bees are our biggest allies on the farm. If you have a bee or bug fear – Now is the time to change your views on their purposes!

Baby Arugula is an aromatic peppery salad green loaded with Vitamins A and C. One serving is equivalent to 2 calories. It is very popular in Italian cuisine and grows wild all over Asia and the Mediterranean. Baby arugula makes for a wonderful salad or sandwich topping. You can also cook with it like spinach. The easiest way to introduce the flavor to kids is to mix it into a regular lettuce blend and the mild peppery flavor tastes great with ranch dressing. Arugula is also making its way to a popular pizza topping – raw or baked.

Oregano is usually the first herb to be ready on our farm. It is a hardy perennial that almost becomes invasive. All it needed was a little rainfall, like we so luckily had, and it grew twice its size in a matter of days! Fresh oregano can be added to anything; salads, soups, casseroles, sautéing, etc. If you are looking to dry oregano – simply lay out the herb on a paper towel on a countertop. Spread out and rotate several times so it is able to completely dry. After about 3 days, you can crush and store it in a jar in your cabinet. More herbs to come soon = more flavors to work with all summer.

Broccoli is a special gift to you this week from us. We decided to contact a fellow certified organic farmer to purchase broccoli for our own CSA members as we are in need of items to fill our boxes during this "weird" spring growing season. No worries – this rain changes everything!

Asparagus is a rare and special veggie to see in your share box. This is not an item we are typically able to give to CSA members due to the lack of maturity of our crop. It is really hard to grow and we are beginning to get the hang of things after 37 years! Soon enough, we will be able to officially offer asparagus on our CSA harvest chart.

Spring Veggie Bagel Sandwich
Ingredients:
1 / 4 cup cream cheese
1 / 4 teaspoon fresh lime juice
1 / 4 teaspoon balsamic vinaigrette
salt and ground black pepper to taste
1 bagel, sliced in half
3 French breakfast radishes, thinly sliced
1 / 4 cup arugula
3 slices tomato
Directions:
Mix the cream cheese, lime juice, balsamic vinaigrette, salt, and pepper in a bowl. Spread the mixture evenly over one of the bagel halves. Arrange the radish slices, arugula, and tomato on top of the cream cheese. Sandwich with the remaining bagel half.

Arugula/Portabella Béchamel Sauce with Rice, Quinoa, or Pasta
5 oz. arugula chopped
2 large portabella mushrooms chopped, sauté in 1 /4 cup butter
Add arugula and allow it to wilt
Stir in 1 / 2 tsp. Italian seasoning (1 tsp. minced garlic, 1 / 8 tsp. pepper, 1 / 2 tsp. salt, 1 tsp. fresh minced ginger)
Add 2 cups white sauce and stir
Serve over pasta, rice, or quinoa

Radish Canapés with Fresh Herb
--use fresh dill, cilantro, basil or oregano...
Remove radish tops and scrub the roots clean and allow to drain. Slice each one into about 5 rounds. Slice good hearty bread into 4-5 slices, then into smaller bite-size pieces. Spread each with a generous amount of plain cream cheese. Press a fresh herb sprig onto cream cheese and top each with a radish slice or two or three!! Delicious, simple and country elegant!!!

Stir Fry with Thai Peanut Sauce and Rice Noodles
1 /2 head of cabbage, sliced thin
1 /2 C fresh sliced onion
3 cloves of garlic or 5-10 garlic scapes sliced
1 C sliced carrots
2 C sliced and minced Kale
1 head Broccoli chopped
1 /4 C butter or sesame oil –add more if needed as you are cooking and stirring
1 t salt 1 / 4 t pepper
Optional: dice 1 C uncooked bacon or other desired meat and add to the stir fry.
2 T fresh basil, chopped (add last) and 2 T chopped fresh parsley
Heat oil in large skillet or pot, prepare all vegetables and stir fry on medium high heat until firm-about 10 minutes, more or less following your desired firmness. Stir often. Add salt and pepper and herbs last. Add 1 / 2 C water and 1 / 2 C Thai peanut sauce or other desired sauce. Peanut sauce will have some heat. Stir and remove from heat.
Prepare a package of Thai Rice Noodles and serve with the stir fry vegetables

Week 2 CSA Delivery

Your Projected Share Menu this week:

Spinach

Keep in a bag in the veg drawer of the fridge and do not wash until using

Spring Onions

Trim roots and tops and store in a bag in the veg drawer

Sweet Potatoes

Hearty survivors from last year's harvest. Do not refrigerate. Store on a countertop away from direct sunlight

Garlic Chives

Store in a small sealed plastic bag in the fridge

Mixed Greens

Store bagged lettuce right in the veg drawer of the fridge

Yellow Onion

Harvested last fall and a proven to be a successful staple in home cooking
Does not need refrigerated

Collards

Keep in a sealed plastic bag away from moisture in the fridge

Please recycle all of the share boxes each week by leaving them at your pickup site

A beautiful hot and dry forecast for this week is exactly what we love to see and will surely give the farm some headway on planting outside. Rain is obviously wonderful but it also delays and prevents us from being able to work the ground when it is so wet. These sunny dry spells are giving us lots of time to plow, disc, and get all the fields prepped for transplants. This week, we will be planting lots of kale, cabbage, and parsley. April is also always the month to get all of our head lettuces into the ground like romaine, red, and green leaf that you will all see later in May. This weather reminds me of the ideal California growing climate- where you just need to "add water." Of course that brings up the alarming problem of water scarcity on the west coast and just like them, we are irrigating every day in this weather. In the greenhouse this week, we are seeding our first waves of zucchini, cucumbers, and cantaloupes! I know we are all craving fresh fruit with the warm weather and we are so happy to report that the strawberries are looking good as well as the black raspberries.
You may be wondering if some crops will be coming early this year from the random warm weeks we had in March? At this point, everything is projected to be ready at its typical harvest times for us. March was a roller coaster month of having 75 and 19 degrees happening in the same week. We did get excited and took some risks getting crops into the ground early during that time. Luckily, we did not have to experience any type of loss and were readily prepared for a cold snap. Much needed time and labor was spent covering all crops in the field with our 1-acre floating cloth row covers that give plants a "greenhouse protection" from frost. This type of spring has been particularly hard on stone fruits like peaches and plums. Our hearts go out to our friends and local fruit growers in Adams County. Many trees began to bud and flower early and then were sadly frozen within a week. Unfortunately, fruit trees will only bud/flower once a year. Every flower is a peach; every bud is a plum. This situation really emphasizes the major differences between growing fruits versus vegetables and hopefully sheds some light onto the risks of growing and the cost of buying fruits – especially organic!

Sweet Potatoes are a great first food for babies. They are easy to digest, sweet, and very healthy. Peel, cube, and simmer in water until they are soft. Then put it in a baby food blender, processor, or simple blender. This will make a lot, so the trick is to fill up an ice cube tray of it to freeze. Then you can easily pop them out to store separately in a bag of baby portions to thaw as needed. This was all of the Brownback kids' first food and is currently devoured by Will's 6-month old daughter, Isla.

Garlic Chives are fresh and ready to add flavor to anything. They taste great on salads, eggs, casseroles, meat, and of course – a baked potato.

Collards sautéed will taste similar to kale or spinach. I recommend cooking with raw bacon and onions for no longer than 10 mins. It's a great side dish or topping to rice or potatoes. Do not overcook collards! The best way to prepare is by stacking and rolling the bunch tightly together and chopping very finely including the stems

Shepherd's Pie//Collards Style
1 bunch collards, sliced and then chopped fine 1 / 2 lb bacon, chopped uncooked * optional
1 onion, chopped 3 cloves garlic, sliced
2 Cups thinly sliced carrots 1 / 4 C sesame oil
4 C mashed gold potatoes
2 C shredded cheddar cheese 1 / 2 t salt & 1 / 4 t pepper
2 T tamari sauce –this is naturally fermented soy sauce, great flavor
Heat the sesame oil in a large skillet, add bacon (optional,) onions, garlic, carrots, stir and cook till translucent. Add collards all at once and stir to coat. Add 2 T water to steam and cover on med heat for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. When collards are fully softened, add the tamari sauce, and stir. Place this mix in a 9x13 glass lasagna pan. Cover with mashed potatoes, and top with cheese. Bake at 375 degrees for about 45 minutes. This is so tasty. May use with any type of cooking green

SPRING SPINACH MEDLEY
1 bunch of spinach, chopped
1 bunch spring onions, sliced
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 eggs, beaten
1 C grated cheese (sharp is best or 1 / 2 C parmesan)
Salt/pepper to taste
Noodles or brown rice, cooked
Sauté onions and garlic in hot olive oil until soft. Add spinach, allow to wilt. Salt and pepper to taste. Add the beaten eggs, stir, and turn off heat. Add the cheese and allow to melt and the eggs to firm up with lid on. Serve over rice or noodles. The addition of about 1 cup of ricotta cheese is also delicious. One cup of spinach provides 5 grams of protein.
Enjoy now, spinach likes cool weather only.

Collards Sweet Potato Pot
1 lb. Italian sausage hot or sweet *Optional- see note below.
4 Tbsp. chopped spring onion (minced green & white parts)
3 garlic cloves
1 bunch collards (leaves & small stems chopped)
2 C cubed raw sweet potatoes (skins on)
2 C sweet corn (from freezer- no thaw)
Cook sausage in heavy pot (whole links). Remove sausage and cool. Slice links thin and reserve for later. Add all other vegetables except corn to the sausage pot. Add 1 / 4 cup water, 1 tsp. salt, 1 / 4 tsp. pepper (if using sweet sausage). Cover and stir often over medium heat with lid. Cook until sweet potatoes are tender. Add frozen corn and stir to heat. Then add sliced sausage. Stir until all is heated. Serve as is or over rice or noodles. *Note- sausage is optional- use olive oil to sauté the vegetables if not using sausage. Also- this recipe can be substituted with kale

Baked Sweet Potatoes
Scrub medium sweet potatoes. If very large cut into medium size pieces. Do not peel!! Wrap in foil. Bake for about one hour at 400 degrees. They often create drippings, so place on a baking sheet for easier oven clean-up.

Spinach Pasta Salad
Toss the following ingredients:
16 oz. Spinach leaves
1 bunch asparagus cooked and sliced into 1" pieces
1 leek thinly sliced
1 lb. Cooked and drained penne pasta
3 / 4 c. toasted sliced almonds
1 c. shredded parmesan cheese
Add the following dressing:
1 / 2 c. olive oil
4 T. rice vinegar
4 T. soy sauce
1T. sugar
3 T. fresh chopped basil

Week 1 Introductory Letter

Welcome to the Spiral Path Farm CSA!

We are honored and excited to be your trusted farmers. 2016 marks our 23rd year of offering Community Supported Agriculture memberships at our farm. Thank you off the bat for participating in a life-changing local foods movement that is sure to enhance the health and dynamics of your household. Please note that you are receiving 100% USDA certified Organic produce, typically, the day after it has been picked. Quite possibly – the freshest food you will ever taste without having a garden of your own. Certified organic means all of our seeds are strictly Non-GMO and we go through rigorous certifications multiple times a year. We do not use pesticides or herbicides and absolutely zero animal fertilizer goes onto the produce. The dirt is good for you! Our farm's mission is aimed at protecting and building our soil's health. We briefly clean all veggies (never fruit) before you receive it in your share boxes. Anything that is bagged has been pre-washed. Legally, salad mixes must be "triple washed" in order to be labeled food-ready in a grocery store, so we encourage you to give it a last rinse at home. Some of our own CSA members have been referred to us by their local doctor because they have been directed towards organic food with a healthy amount of dirt remaining on it for a full micro biotic diet. So you are safe to consider us your "farmacy" and our mission is to provide you with preventative medicine. You have successfully skipped the (middle man) grocery store warehouse storage times, where produce is harvested before it is even ripe, and went straight to supporting the farmer directly. If you are ever unsatisfied with the quality of anything in your CSA – please do not hesitate to contact us. We want to have a close relationship with our consumers as your support is what keeps our family farm going each year.

Your Share Menu This Week:

Bunched Spinach

Keep in a bag in the veg drawer of the fridge and do not wash until using

Spring Onions

Trim roots and tops and store in a bag in the veg drawer

French Breakfast Radishes

Trim the tops off and store radishes in the fridge separated from their greens
(tops are great in soup)

Kale Raab

Store in the fridge in a bag away from moisture

Gold Potatoes

Alive and well from last year's harvest! Use soon – they want to sprout
Store in a cool dark place like under the kitchen sink in the bag given

Yellow Onion

Harvested last fall and a proven to be a successful staple in home cooking
Does not need refrigerated

Baby Romaine

Blended red and green tender leaves. Store in the fridge as dry as possible. Do not wash until using

Please recycle all of the share boxes each week

by simply pulling out the biodegradable bag for easy handling and leaving the empty box for our delivery team to pick up each week. Our honor-system works very well, so if you are unable to pick up your share simply contact your site host to hold for the next day or have a friend or neighbor pickup on your behalf.

Farm News / Veggie Briefing:

Kale Raab is "feral" kale that has survived throughout the winter and is just about to flower and become very similar to rapini or broccoli raab! Luckily, the heavy snowfall over last winter actually protected this ancient plant from the cold. Feral kale also acts like a cover crop in our fields that is kept to build soil nutrients and attract good pollinators in the early spring. Not to mention naturally sweetened from the cold weather! I recommend sautéing it into your favorite pasta dish.

Spring Onions (aka scallions) are onions who have simply not matured yet. Trim the roots off and leave about 7-8 inches of green stem that is full of flavor. Chop and use in any recipe for that fresh spring taste in salads or cooking. These will be your onions until we harvest and cure the large bulbs in July.

French Breakfast Radishes are not your average spicy radish. They are much milder in flavor and can be a great introduction to kids with a little cream cheese on a cracker.

Radish Dip
1 package (8 ounces) cream cheese, softened
1 / 4 cup butter, softened
1 cup finely chopped radishes
1 / 2 cup finely chopped onion
2 teaspoons dried parsley flakes
1 / 2 teaspoon seasoned salt
Assorted fresh vegetables or crackers
In a small bowl, beat cream cheese and butter until smooth; stir in the radishes, onion, parsley and seasoned salt.
Chill for at least 1 hour. Serve with vegetables or crackers

Grilled Scallions
Brush and oil your grill. Heat to medium. Preset the scallions on the grill (over the cooler zone if using charcoal), and cook until they have good grill marks, 2 to 4 min.
Flip and cook until they're tender, 2 to 4 min.
Transfer to a large platter and drizzle with a couple of tablespoons of the sesame sauce. Be experimental with sauces- use your favorite.
Serve the grilled scallions with your favorite grilled meat or veggies.

Lemon Raab
Ingredients:
Water, salt, 1 bunch kale raab chopped, 1-1 / 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, 1 clove minced garlic, Pinch red pepper flakes, 1 / 4 cup grated fresh Parmesan, 1 zested lemon, sea salt, ground black pepper
Directions:
In a large sauce pot, bring 1 gallon of salted water to a boil. Add the raab and blanch for 1 minute. Drain. Meanwhile, heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add oil, garlic and red pepper flakes. Allow garlic to brown. Add raab to skillet with toasted garlic. Toss to combine. Toss in Parmesan and lemon zest. Season with salt and pepper. Cook over medium-high heat for 2 to 3 minutes.

Kale Raab Chowder with Corn
submitted by CSA member Carol O'Toole
Ingredients:
1 medium onion, chopped
1 / 4 cup all-purpose flour
2 cans reduced-sodium chicken broth
1 large baking potato, peeled and diced
1 bunch kale raab, chopped coarsely
1 package (10 ounces) frozen corn kernels
1 / 2 teaspoon dried thyme
1 cup whole milk
Coarse salt and ground pepper
Instructions:
In a large pot, sauté onion, stirring, until it begins to soften, 6 to 8 minutes.
Add flour; cook, stirring constantly, 30 seconds. Add broth and
potato; bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer; cook until potato is tender, about 10 minutes. Add kale raab, corn, thyme, and milk. Cook until kale is crisp-tender, 8 to 10 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.

Bacon Caprese Salad
Ingredients:
1 lb. fresh mozzarella cheese, cut into 1 / 4 inch slices, 3 plum tomatoes cut into 1 / 4 inch slices
1 1 / 2 cups fresh baby spinach, 8 bacon strips, cooked and coarsely crumbled
1 / 2 cup minced fresh basil, 2 green onions chopped, 1 / 4 cup balsamic vinaigrette
1 / 2 tsp. salt, 1 / 4 tsp. coarsely ground pepper
Directions:
Arrange cheese, tomatoes and spinach on a large serving platter; top with bacon, basil and green onions. Just before serving sprinkle with salt and pepper.

Pre-Season Farm News

Please mark your calendars: our September Open Farm Day has been CHANGED to Saturday, September 17th

The first week of CSA deliveries will be April 11th - just three weeks away! Make sure to check your confirmation emails for your pickup times and directions.

I know we are all so excited to have fresh local produce back in our lives. These early warm temperatures have seemed to given us all spring fever and we can be expecting lots of produce soon(er) than in previous years. The farm is excited to begin our 23rd year of doing CSA deliveries in central PA. Each passing winter gives us a chance to make repairs, plan, and expand. This winter, we had one of our transplant greenhouses collapse during the heavy snowfall in January. We had already begun seeding lettuce, onions, and kale when this occurred, so we needed to get one rebuilt - and fast! Somehow, we assembled a new greenhouse in its place with our dedicated winter crew of 6 guys in under a month. We are now breaking ground for an expansion of our packing house, which has been needed for years as our coolers and packing space has been maxed out with our growing produce demands. This also means a better facility for our employees! Currently, most of the farm crew is back at work with the packing house doing a deep spring cleaning of everything. Each basket, knife, crate, machine, etc. gets totally sanitized and ready to receive fresh food from the fields. We annually go through all of our CSA boxes and dispose of those who didn't make it through the weather last year -and there are always hundreds of boxes to assemble despite our wonderful recycling system. The greenhouse girls are in their prime season of seeding and taking care of all of our transplants that require many different cares and approaches. All 5 of our transplant greenhouses are maxed out with flats each day that hold mostly everything our members will receive until July. Our last seeding usually gets done in late August for our last winter months of harvest. Tractors and wagons are buzzing by the office every hour as we have been getting many calls and emails for sign-ups.

This year, our CSA members can look forward to a wide variety of USDA organic vegetables and fruits. Our early April and May members can be expecting to see spring onions, radishes, spinach, lettuces, kales, peas, and cilantro. Our winter storage facility is proving well as it successfully has stored sweet potatoes, yellow onions, and Yukon gold potatoes to help fill up the spring boxes with heavier items. We decided to plant a greenhouse of tomatoes this year that should be ready for harvest in early June to go with all of the salad greens and we couldn't be more excited for early tomatoes! My goal this season is to grow more herbs for our members. We want to kick up the flavor in our boxes and really aim towards the people (foodies) who enjoy cooking with fresh produce and want to expand their palettes.

Thanks again for joining our Community Supported Agriculture program,
Lucas

The last week of CSA deliveries

This is the LAST CSA delivery for the year

Your Share Menu:

Baby Arugula
Leeks
Red Cabbage
Sweet Potatoes
Yellow Onions
Kale
Japanese White Turnips
Garlic
Butternut Squash

How can it be the end of our growing season when I barely need to wear a jacket to come into work in the morning?! I believe this warm front has all living creatures confused, especially plants. Our hearty fall crops are desiring freezing cold over-night temperatures with brilliant sun and crisp air during the day. Certainly not thick fog that lasts long into the afternoon like we have had here lately. This December is a good example of how you can never accurately predict or pre-plan a growing season. Though we are all enjoying this northern California weather, the plants ironically are not. Our leek crop yielded small in size, but it is our last week of deliveries, so we must harvest them regardless of their readiness. We will just have to adjust and enjoy tiny, delicacy leeks this year. Our kale plants are still producing, though clearly stunted in growth due to the changing weather and lack of sunshine in the past week. You can also harvest the same kale plant up to 3 times, so many of our plants have been stripped to the max, timed perfectly with the end of our CSA season. I know that everyone on the farm is ready for some winter down time to rejuvenate our strengths for next year. We will begin seeding in the greenhouses in early January in preparation for our first weeks of CSA in April. The fun never stops! A lot of people ask why we do not continue to grow in our greenhouses throughout the winter and the answer is simple in our mission statement as a farm: We are adamant on producing the highest quality nutrient-rich food as possible. This means we strongly believe in crop rotation and the application of cover crops to the ground after a field has been harvested and tilled. Cover crops, like peas and oats, are what we plant into a field to add and bring up the nutrients that exist in the soil during the off-season. Once our leek field had been harvested, it was immediately tilled, and then seeded with a nutritious mixture of cover crops that will stay there all winter to improve the grounds for the next crop to come in the spring. Our greenhouses work the same way. After this baby arugula is harvested for the share this week, we will till and keep a cover crop in the greenhouse all winter. Though we could continue to grow indoors throughout January and February, our soil quality would deplete greatly, so we would rather space out our planting to what the earth would naturally produce. Our greenhouses are also not heated, so it is also a matter of sustainability for growing indoors.
Thank you from my family and farm crew for supporting us this year through the CSA. We over-all had a terrific year of harvesting with zero hail and few crop failures. We hope to have the pleasure of being your farmers again in the near future. Please have a wonderful winter and look forward to delicious greens, potatoes, and root veggies next April from us.
Happy Holidays ~ Lucas

Sweet Potato Quesadillas
1 and 1 / 2 cup onion
2 cloves garlic
Sauté in large frypan in 1 tbsp. oil until translucent.
2 tsp dried oregano
1 and 1 / 2 tsp each dried basil, marjoram, chili powder
1 and 1 / 2 tsp ground cumin
pinch of ground red pepper or to taste
Add and cook another minute.
4 cups sweet potatoes (cooked and mashed)
Add and heat through, frequently stirring to prevent sticking. Add salt and pepper to taste.
8 tortillas
1 cup cheddar cheese (shredded)
Spread about 1 / 2 cup filling and 2 tbsp. cheese on half of each tortilla, leaving a 1 / 2 " border on the sides. Fold tortilla in half. Place on oiled baking sheets. Brush tops with oil. Bake in preheated oven at 400F until brown, 15-20 minutes. Serve with sour cream and salsa

Brassicas Babatunde
1 head chopped Cauliflower
1 head chopped Collards
1 head chopped Kale
8 cloves chopped garlic
2 cups chopped onion
5 Turnips
2 cups chopped mushrooms
1 cup roasted tomatoes
Stir-Fry chopped cauliflower with collards, kale, turnips, onions, garlic. Add generous amounts of mushrooms and 1C roasted tomatoes at the end. Serve over rice or favorite pasta.

Creamy White Turnips
1 lg. clove garlic
1 lb. Turnips, washed & sliced thin, cut into 2 inch pieces if large turnip
2 tbsp. all-purpose flour
1 / 4 c. snipped chives or minced onions
1 and 1 / 4 c. heavy cream
1 / 2 tsp. salt, 1 / 2 tsp. freshly ground pepper, 1 / 4 tsp. nutmeg
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Rub inside of small casserole (7 x 10) with cut garlic and butter well. Layer in 1 / 3 of the turnips, sprinkle with 1 tablespoon flour and 1 / 3 of the chives. Repeat with another layer of turnips, flour and chives, then top with the remaining turnips and chives. Heat the cream with the salt, pepper and nutmeg and taste to see if it needs more salt (some add sugar too). Pour over turnips, cover and bake for 30 minutes. Remove cover and continue baking about 20 minutes until done, cream is thickened and top browned.

Arugula Salad makes about 4 generous servings
2 C fresh arugula, sliced thin
1 red pepper, sliced thin
1 C toasted sunflower seeds
1 C lettuce, sliced thin
1 / 2 C chopped tomatoes
1 C pear or apple -thin slices
balsamic vinaigrette
fresh earth salt
fresh ground pepper
Prepare minutes before serving on individual plates. Layer ingredients attractively for color and shape. Dust with the salt and pepper. Sprinkle with the seeds (or favorite toasted nuts) Dress lightly with the vinaigrette and serve immediately.

Leeks

Your Share Menu:

Leeks
Baby Spinach
Carrots
Gold Potatoes
Yellow Onions
Napa Cabbage
Butterkin Squash
Tuscan Kale

Our 2016 CSA Season is open for sign-ups!

Go online and rejoin through our website at www.spiralpathfarm.com
or feel free to call our office and we can get you set up over the phone.
Take advantage of our Early Bird Discount of 5% off when you join by March 15th!

Leeks! Nothing can quite explain the aroma of the pack house after our first huge leek harvest. The rain late last week and cold temperatures at night have been the perfect combination to bring on one of my favorite fall crops. Leeks are a part of the onion and garlic family and can be used in just about anything. Trim the roots and scrub away the remaining good organic soil. The white and yellow base holds the most strength in flavor but you can use the entire green stem as well. Cut the leek into tiny ringlets and sauté with anything in olive oil until they are translucent. Have a tiny leek? Cook it whole on top of steak. We figured everyone is ready for the very popular potato leek soup so we are sending out our Nicola gold potatoes to make for a smooth soup or hearty chowder. Check out our classic recipe on the back. I highly recommend adding much more than the typical ingredients. Almost everything in the box this week can be thrown into potato leek soup, especially the Tuscan kale and carrots. This soup also freezes very well so no worries with making a huge pot. It is unbelievable that our harvest weeks are coming to an end- fast. I love waking up before dawn this time of year. December has had some incredible sunrises so far. I find myself looking forward to doing physical work outside in the winter because it is an easy way to stay warm all day and you really learn how hot the sunshine still is in 30 degrees. I will miss the fresh produce tremendously – especially the greens. Hope you are enjoying the extra onions and cabbage. We really are trying to load you up for the winter! Lucas

Khaya's Korner

The season is almost over, and that means vacation for the Brownbacks! Since nobody in the family can get away from the farm in spring; summer; and fall, winter time is when we go on vacay. I was hoping to go somewhere warm, but that's not what my dad had in mind. He says we are going to Mammoth Cave in Smokey Mountains National Park. My brother still wants to go to Mt. Rushmore even though my dad says that is out of the question. Mt. Rushmore's cold even in the summer! It's weird to think that I not going to be writing any newsletters until April. If you have any questions or want to email me that's fine. Send them to the farm's email address. - Khaya

POTATO LEEK SOUP This is a Brownback family favorite
Scrub potatoes, do not peel and cube into small pieces, about 5-6 cups. Slice 2-3 leeks (I use the green parts too nearly
1 / 2 way up to the leaves) Sauté in olive oil. Optional: to make a leek-kale- potato soup, finely mince one bunch of kale and wilt with the leeks. Add potatoes, 1 T salt, 1 t pepper. Barely cover with water. Bring to a boil and simmer for 45 minutes. For a perfectly smooth soup, puree in a blender, if kale was added, it will be a beautiful shade of green. For the chunkier version, which we prefer, simply mash by hand in the kettle with a hand masher. Add 2 C whole milk or half and half cream plus about 2 C shredded cheddar cheese.

Spinach-Leek-Potato Soup
2 leeks
1 pound potatoes, scrubbed & cubed
4 oz shitake mushrooms
1 t chopped rosemary, 1 / 2 t dried
2 T olive oil
Salt & freshly ground pepper
Parmesan cheese
5 C vegetable or chicken stock
1 / 2 pound of spinach (one bag), chopped
Chop leeks and rinse well. Remove and reserve mushroom stems; cut mushroom tops into thin strips. Heat oil in soup pot. Add leeks, mushroom stems and 1 / 4 of the mushroom strips; cover and cook over medium-low heat until leeks are tender, about 20 minutes. Add 2 C stock; bring to a boil. Add spinach; cover and simmer 5-6 minutes. Puree this mixture in blender or food processor. Return puree to the pot. Stir in remaining stock, bring to a simmer, and add potatoes, remaining mushroom strips, rosemary, and salt to taste. Simmer, partially covered till tender, about 15-20 minutes. Season to taste with pepper and additional salt if desired. Serve each bowl with Parmesan cheese. Makes 4-6 servings.

Kale Greens with Pasta
In large deep fry pan, sauté 2 sliced leeks, 1 C grated carrot, and 3 cloves sliced garlic in olive oil. May add one Hungarian hot wax pepper, deseeded and diced. Finely chop the entire bunch of kale, include the tender sweet stems. After veggies are soft, add kale and stir till wilted. Add 1 t salt, 1 / 4 t pepper, 1 T fresh oregano and 1 C water and cover / steam over high heat for 10-15 minutes, stirring every few minutes. Cover the greens with 2 C grated cheese, cheddar is great...
Cook up your favorite style pasta and serve with the greens. Goes well with rice or potatoes also.
*The addition of this greens mix to an omelet is an awesome supper or brunch.

Butterkin Squash Casserole
1 pkg. couscous
1 butternut squash, peeled and cut into cubes
Butter, brown sugar
Cinnamon, nutmeg
Parmesan cheese, shredded
Cook the couscous using the directions on the package. Line the bottom of a greased 9 x 12 casserole with the couscous. Boil the squash in water until soft. Drain. Mash the squash. Mix in butter, brown sugar, cinnamon, and nutmeg to taste. Pour on top of couscous. Sprinkle the top with parmesan cheese. Bake at 350 for 30-40 minutes.

Baby Greenhouse Repairs

Your Share Menu:

Sweet Potatoes
Garlic
Red Cabbage
Collard Greens
Yellow Onions
Tasti-Crisp & Baby Romaine Blend
Butternut Squash (Full Share Only This Week)

The over-night temperatures have been dropping very low at the farm. I have been splitting a lot of wood from fallen dead trees that were ripped out during a storm earlier this year. I am sure last February taught us all how drastically cold the winters in PA can be so I am preparing for the unknown season to come. Last year, it took the farm house more wagons of wood than ever before to keep the house warm and the pipes safe from freezing. At this time of year when our field crew is not harvesting, we are busy making endless repairs to buildings. One of our main projects at the moment is repairing and rebuilding one of our most important greenhouses where all the plants at Spiral Path begin. "The Baby House" is a small greenhouse where most flats go immediately after being seeded and watered to germinate on the specially heated floors. This is always our hottest controlled greenhouse. Once the majority of the plants in a flat have emerged from the soil, it has then successfully germinated and can be moved into a different greenhouse with cooler temperatures that begin to "toughen" the plant to grow stronger in preparation to be transplanted outside eventually. Our Baby House is one of our oldest greenhouse structures and needed a strong floor replacement to keep it well insulated from the cold and insects. We completely pulled out the old foundation and poured a new concrete floor with water lines underneath to more effectively heat the floors and keep the moisture level high. Most farmers combine a list all year of buildings that need a little love when we have more time in the winter. The sweet potatoes this week look a little different because they have all been hand cut in our pack house. They were the wounded victims of the machine that harvests them deep from the ground and there are always plenty of cut potatoes that are completely fine for using. These potatoes should heal fine and we recommend using them before the other ones we have be giving out. Enjoy the fresh red cabbage! Lucas

Our 2016 CSA Season is open for sign-ups!

Go online and rejoin through our website at www.spiralpathfarm.com or feel free to call our office and we can get you set up easily over the phone 717-789-4433.

Take advantage of our Early Bird Discount of 5% off when you join by March 15th!

Khaya's Korner

I am so excited because my mom said my family could go Christmas caroling this year! I am most excited to sing "O Little Town of Bethlehem", but my mom is most excited to sing "Silent Night". My brother probably wants to sing "O Christmas Tree" because that is the song he is playing on the piano. On the piano I am playing "Silent Night", "Over the River and Through the Woods", and "O Little Town of Bethlehem". That is why I want to sing "O Little Town of Bethlehem". This is going to be the first time I've ever gone caroling! My mom says it is going to be really fun. I also think it is going to be a blast! I am so excited!

Cabbage Blush from member Karen Kline
Red Cabbage
Honey Dijon Mustard
Blue Cheese
Directions:
Slice Red Cabbage to a medium slaw
Add to boiling water
Cook as per blanching
You don't want to lose too much of the bright red color but cabbage should be semi soft
Drain well
Turn to bowls and add Honey Dijon dressing until thoroughly coated
Add a good mild creamy blue cheese for the topping to taste

Fresh Red Cabbage Slaw ~ very sweet, tender, and tasty
Remove first 1 or 2 outer layers of red cabbage, discard. Slice in half and cut out the core. Grate one half head of cabbage on medium grater. Toss with a balsamic vinaigrette. Delicious and a nutritious start for an autumn meal.

Grandma Bevy's Broccoli-Walnut Bake
3-4 cups of trimmed stalks and broccoli florets--steam till bright green
2 C milk
1 C chicken stock-—may substitute vegetable stock (see above)
1 / 2 C flour
1 / 2 C butter
2 / 3 C water
8 oz stuffing mix or salad croutons, or 2 C bread cubes seasoned with parsley, sage, thyme, salt, pepper.
6 T butter
1 C walnuts chopped
Place steamed broccoli at bottom of buttered 9x13 glass dish. Sprinkle with walnuts. Make a cream sauce with stock, milk, butter, flour. Pour over broccoli. Heat water, add 6 T butter and your bread
(Either packaged or homemade.) Top with the moistened cubes, Bake at 350 for 40 minutes.

Puree of Winter Greens
4 C chicken broth 3 T canola or butter
1 and 1 / 2 chopped kale 1 C chopped collards
2 C shredded cabbage 4 onions or leeks, chopped
3 T flour 1-2 C low-fat milk, salt & pepper to taste.
Bring broth to boil in saucepan. Add all greens. Simmer covered and cook until tender. Cool slightly. Puree in blender or food processor till smooth. Return pureed mix to pan and keep on low. In another pan, blend oil and flour and cook until bubbly. Add 1 C milk and cook until thick, stirring constantly. Fold milk mix into greens mix. Add more milk if too thick, should be a thick soup. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Collards Sweet Potato Pot
1 lb. Italian sausage hot or sweet *Optional- see note below.
4 Tbsp. chopped spring onion (minced green & white parts)
3 garlic cloves
1 bunch collards (leaves & small stems chopped)
2 C cubed raw sweet potatoes (skins on)
2 C sweet corn (from freezer- no thaw)
Cook sausage in heavy pot (whole links). Remove sausage and cool. Slice links thin and reserve for later. Add all other vegetables except corn to the sausage pot. Add 1 / 4 cup water, 1 tsp. salt, 1 / 4 tsp. pepper (if using sweet sausage). Cover and stir often over medium heat with lid. Cook until sweet potatoes are tender. Add frozen corn and stir to heat. Then add sliced sausage. Stir until all is heated. Serve as is or over rice or noodles. *Note- sausage is optional- use olive oil to sauté the vegetables if not using sausage.
Also- this recipe can be substituted with Tuscan kale, or any kind of kale.

Thanksgiving Week

Your Thanksgiving Share:

Butterkin Squash
Italian Parsley
Yukon Gold Potatoes
Swiss Chard
Napa Cabbage
Tasti-Crisp Lettuce Mix
Yellow Onions
Turnips (Full Share)
Broccoli (Med Share)

3 weeks left of CSA deliveries!

Happy Thanksgiving to you and your families from Spiral Path Farm. As a foodie, this is clearly my favorite holiday where I can celebrate and give thanks to the earth and its wonderful natural bounty that fed our ancestors for thousands of years. We truly do owe our entire existence to a 6 inch layer of topsoil and the fact that it rains! I also want to recognize the act of kindness and sharing over-abundance with our neighbors when it is needed and the larger picture around this specific holiday.
Quite the bounty this week for the traditional holiday meal. We are giving out the first round of Yukon gold potatoes out of storage specifically for mashed potatoes. This very popular type of potato tends to successfully store the longest, so we will see most of this variety for CSA in the spring time. Italian flat-leaf parsley is still growing lush out there and will add an amazing flavor to the mashed potatoes, stuffing, and/or turkey! Our broccoli yields are winding down for the season so we hope you enjoy the last little bit that is coming from the well-harvested autumn fields. What would Thanksgiving be without the pie... a butterkin pumpkin pie? Can you believe that winter squash was completely unknown to Europeans until the Americas were found? We would have no idea how to cultivate, store, and cook with these staple foods if the natives did not so generously share the earth with those who were in need. Our Swiss chard that is typically harvested and bunched right in the field was too short for rubber band so we have it bagged up for you this week. Check out the soup recipe on the back for a hearty dose of fiber and Vitamins C, A, and K. Napa cabbage heads are getting larger and sweeter by the day. If you like a little heat in your food, try out the kimchi recipe on the back using this traditional cabbage. -Lucas

Khaya's Korner

I like summer on the farm because my grandma, brother, and I go up to the big hill and look for monarch butterflies. There is milkweed all over the farm, but even so, we usually only spot one or two monarch butterflies. We do normally spot other kinds of butterflies including the yellow swallowtail (which is my favorite). My grandma always tries to take pictures, especially of the beautiful monarch butterfly. Next summer, my mom and I are planning on planting some milkweed seeds around our house. We bought some milkweed seeds from a foundation called Save Our Monarchs. Some cool facts about monarch butterflies- there are actually two types of monarch butterflies, a butterfly sheds its skin, and afterwards it eats that skin. They gain about 2,700 pounds in milkweed leaves, and milkweed leaves are the only thing that monarch butterflies will eat. That is why I like summer.
- Khaya

Pumpkin Pie (using a butterkin or butternut squash) makes 1- 9-inch pie
Cut squash in half or quarters. Place face down on foil-lined baking sheet. Bake at 350 for an hour or until squash is soft and mushy- insert knife test. Remove from oven. Allow to cool. Scrape out seeds. Scrape out pulp, puree to make extra creamy.
Mix all ingredients at once:
3 / 4 C brown sugar,
1 / 2 t cinnamon, 1 / 2 t nutmeg, 1 / 4 t allspice, 1 / 4 t ginger, ( or use 1 t pumpkin pie spice)
1 / 4 t salt
1 and 1 / 2 C pureed pumpkin
3 / 4 C half and half or milk
2 T melted butter
2 eggs.
Pour into your favorite 9 " pastry crust and bake at 400 degrees for 10 minutes, then 350 degrees for about 35 minutes, until filling is set, insert knife and comes out clean.

Chard and Lentil Soup
1-1 2 C lentils
1 bunch Swiss Chard, chopped
1 / 2 C olive oil
3-4 cloves garlic
Salt, freshly ground pepper
3 / 4 C chopped onion
1 rib celery, chopped
3 / 4 C lemon juice
Put lentils in pot and cover with water and cook covered till tender, about 45 minutes. Add chard and 1 C water, cook until the chard is wilted. Sauté onion, garlic, celery, and 1 / 2 t salt in olive oil. Add to the lentils. Add lemon juice and stir into the soup. Taste and correct seasoning. Serve with crusty French bread. Suggested toppings for the soup bowl: chopped tomatoes and parsley, sour cream/yogurt, your favorite herbs.

Butterkin Squash Soup
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 / 2 onion, chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 / 2 Butterkin squash, peeled and seeded, cut into large pieces
32 oz. chicken stock
Salt and pepper
In a large pot, heat olive oil. Add onion and garlic and sauté for 3 minutes. Add squash and stock. Cover and increase heat to high; cook for 15 minutes. Reduce heat and cook for another 10 minutes. Use a food processor, to blend soup until smooth and creamy. Season with salt and pepper.

Kimchi: a spicy Korean side-dish, sort of like the hottest coleslaw you've ever eaten.
Traditional kimchi can take several days to make. However, for a quick at-home version, combine a few cups of chopped Napa cabbage, a tablespoon of sambal olek (an Eastern hot sauce), 3 tablespoons of rice wine vinegar, 4 sliced cloves of garlic, and a healthy pinch of salt. Stir well, chill overnight and then eat right out of the bowl!

Long-Term Storage Shed

My kitchen counter is beginning to look like a storage area for all types of winter squash. Many of you are still sitting on a spaghetti squash, just waiting to use it at the right time. What a blessing it is to be stocked up on CSA goodies long after the harvest season ends. Have you ever wondered how we still have onions, potatoes, and winter squash in the shares for months after their peak harvest season? Or how you will still be receiving garlic in December? Last year at this time, we were in the process of building a 4 bay storage shed that would properly house veggies that naturally store for long periods of time. The building was finally completed in the spring of this year and is a major help and season extender for our CSA members this year. Our coolers were maxed out and every crop requires a different precise temperature and humidity level to successfully store for months. As you have been experiencing, we haven't missed a week of onions since June and we are about to finish out this year with a "bang" of butternut and butterkin squash! Thanks to the new storage shed, we will all hopefully be cutting into a deliciously ripe and well -kept winter squash in January. Don't forget that pureed squash does very well in the freezer, as well as chopped kale and cabbage. It has been an interesting learning experience to figure out how to balance and preserve over-abundance while I have it. This is the exact requirements that we base our 4 separate storage rooms off of and it is a good rule of thumb to follow in your own households for long term storage:
Garlic and onions in 34 degrees with 65% humidity.
Sweet potatoes in 55 degrees with 90% humidity.
Winter squash in 58 degrees with 65% humidity.
Potatoes in 38 degrees with 95% humidity.
Please note that all of these crops are cured/prepped for long term storage so that when you receive them, you can naturally leave things like onions and garlic on the countertop as usual. These temperatures are only to be used for holding things for months at a time. For any further reference, check out our website's section called "Our Produce."
This week, I am so very excited to be making a smooth and creamy butternut squash soup – with sweet carrots and nutrient rich kale! I am craving the smell almost as much as the soup. Check out the recipe on the back and enjoy ~ Lucas

Your Share Menu This Week:

Carrots
Kale
Sweet Potatoes
Garlic
Butternut Squash
Tasti-Crisp Lettuce Mix
Yellow Onions
Cabbage (Medium Share Only)
Kohlrabi (Full Share Only)

Looking for a personal chef or help for all or part of the upcoming holiday meal?
Contact Linda Wittig, Personal Chef!
http://www.lindawittig.com
724-495-9674
717-482-8540
lwittig2@comcast.net

Carrot and Squash Soup by CSA member Alison Rosen
1 butternut squash, 1 / 2 onion chopped, 1 turnip chopped, 2 carrots chopped, 3 c. vegetable broth, 1 c. applesauce,
1 / 4 t. cardomon, 1 / 4 t. nutmeg, 1 t. grated ginger
Half and seed the squash. Microwave covered squash until soft enough to cut into 1" cubes. Put all ingredients in a soup pot and simmer. When all vegetables are soft, remove from heat and cool. Puree all ingredients in a blender and reheat. If too thick, add more broth. If too thin, add more applesauce.

Butternut Squash and Cinnamon Soup
Serves: 4 appetizer servings
Ingredients
1 (2-pound) butternut squash, halved lengthwise and seeded
1 and 1 / 2 to 2 cups vegetable or chicken broth (can be made from bouillon cubes)
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon Salt and pepper
Chopped fresh chives or scallions, for garnish, optional
Preheat oven to 375 degrees F
Spray a 13 by 9 by 2-inch glass baking dish with nonstick spray. Place squash, cut side down, in prepared dish. Pierce each squash half several times with a toothpick or skewer. Bake until squash is tender, about 45 minutes.
Using a large spoon, scrape squash into the bowl of a food processor, discarding the skin. Add 1 and 1 / 2 cups broth and the cinnamon and puree until smooth. Add remaining broth if needed. Transfer puree to a heavy large saucepan. Stir over medium heat until heated through. Season, to taste, with salt and pepper.

Butternut-Apple Crisp Bars
3 cups sliced peeled butternut squash, 3 cups sliced peeled tart apples
1 cup packed light brown sugar, 2 tsp lemon juice
1 tsp ground cinnamon
1 / 8 tsp ground cloves
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 / 2 tsp salt
6 tbsp. unsalted butter, softened
1 / 3 cup chopped nuts
Ice cream (optional)
Preheat the oven to 350 F. Grease a 9 inch square baking pan.
Combine the squash and apple slices with 1 / 2 cup of the brown sugar, lemon juice, cinnamon, cloves, tossing gently, in a large bowl. Turn into the prepared pan, cover with aluminum foil, and bake for 30 minutes.
Meanwhile, combine the flour, the remaining 1 / 2 cup brown sugar and the salt. Stir in the butter with a fork until crumbly. Add the nuts. Spread evenly over the squash-apple mixture.
Bake uncovered for 40 minutes more. Cut into 9 squares; top with ice cream, if desired, and serve.

Sweet Potato Pie
3-4 med. Sweet potatoes
1 / 3 C. softened butter, 1 / 3 C. sugar, 1 / 3 C. Brown Sugar, 1 / 2 tsp. Salt
1 / 4 tsp nutmeg, 2 eggs, beaten, 1 tsp vanilla, 2 / 3 C. milk, 1 unbaked 9"pie crust
Boil Sweet Potatoes until tender. Cool slightly-peel & mash (about 2 cups). Combine ingredients until creamy. Bake in 350 oven for 50-60 minutes.
Cool to room temperature before serving. Store in refrigerator

Introducing Napa Cabbage

This Week's Projected CSA Share Menu:
Napa Cabbage
Nicola Gold Potatoes
Yellow Onions
Acorn Squash
Red Beets
Tasti-Crisp Lettuce Mix
Specialty Acorn Squash
Cauliflower (Full Share Only)

Thanksgiving Week Delivery Changes

In order to get everyone their CSA share before the big holiday feast on Thursday, we will be delivering all shares a day early for that week only! Please make note on your calendars of this change. Boxes will remain at your pickup site until Thursday, that week, for leniency.
You may also change your CSA pickup site to easily match your busy schedule and travel plans. Please simply send us your requested site change in an email.

Tuesday Delivery will be on Monday, the 23rd this week only
Wednesday Delivery will be on Tuesday, the 24th " "
Thursday Delivery will be on Wednesday, the 25th " "
Saturday Market is open
Sunday Market is CLOSED!

Beautiful Napa cabbage is being harvested this week. Napa Cabbage is a type of Chinese cabbage originating in the Beijing area. It is also referred to as "celery cabbage" due to its sweet and crunchy celery-like tasting leaves. Napa cabbage grows best when the days are short and mild. In Korean cuisine, it is the main ingredient in kimchi. This cabbage is great when shredded raw for salads and also makes a wonderful wrap for pork or oyster. The white base stems are great for soups as well. This vegetable is loaded with vitamin K, like all other brassicas in its family, like kale. It also belongs to the zero calorie group like celery. Napa cabbage has also been used in many prenatal diets because it is an excellent source of folates that help prevent neurological diseases in infants! My dad recommends shredding it a salad with peanuts and Thai sauce. This cabbage will also sauté deliciously alongside the gold potatoes that are in the share this week as well. We are sending out 2 types of acorn squash this week, both can be prepared together with almost the same flavor within their hearty shells. Stuff them with your favorite meat, grain, and cheese to bake. Or try a sweet version with brown sugar and maple syrup. Red beets are back and can be eaten raw, boiled, baked, or in a slaw (great recipe on the back). Beets are a great source of Vitamin C, potassium, and fiber. Luckily, they are able to hold their quality in the fridge up to 3 weeks in a sealed plastic bag. We always recommend peeling the beets after they are cooked – so much easier! Hope you are enjoying the fall bounty ~ Lucas

Khaya's Korner

My hobbies are: knitting, making bracelets, baking, listening to music, and cooking lessons from my grandma. I am trying to knit a scarf for my aunt Emilie's Christmas present. I have made 4 bracelets. One was for my friend Jewel, one for my friend Kelsi, one for my neighbor Olivia, and one for me. I love baking cookies and brownies. Once, I got up early and made muffins for breakfast. They were almost gone by the time I got home from school. I listen to music on my ipod on the bus ride and at home. Sometimes when I don't want to go to my brother's soccer games, I go over to my grandma's house. She gives me cooking lessons on how to make all sorts of things. We pretend that we're hosting a cooking show on TV. Once we made funnel cakes. They were delicious! My whole family loved them. – Khaya

Want to eat healthy but do not have the time to cook for yourself always?
Contact Linda Wittig, Personal Chef! 724-495-9674 http://www.lindawittig.com

Need cooking tips or storage info for a new item in your CSA share?
Check out our website under About Our Farm called... "Our Produce"
Also, search through hundreds of recipes online in our virtual CSA COOKBOOK!

Beet and Apple Slaw
1 lb beets, peeled and grated- about ¾ C
1 lb granny smith apples, peeled and grated
1 / 2 lb cabbage, very thinly sliced
Salt & Pepper
3 / 4 cup sugar
3 / 4 cup cider vinegar
3 / 4 cup prepared mayonnaise
Combine the beets, apples, and cabbage in a large nonreactive bowl. Season with salt and pepper to taste, and set aside. Combine the sugar and vinegar in a small saucepan. Warm over very low heat, stirring, until the sugar is dissolved. Set aside until completely cool. Very gradually whisk the mixture into the mayonnaise in a small bowl. Add more salt and pepper to taste.
Fold the dressing into the slaw mixture; cover and refrigerate for about 3 hours. Stir again before serving

Sausage and Apple Stuffed Acorn Squash
2 acorn squash, halved and seeded
1 tablespoon butter, melted
1 / 4 teaspoon garlic salt
1 / 4 teaspoon ground sage
1 lb pork sausage
1 / 2 cup onion,
finely chopped1 celery rib
2 apples, cored and chopped
1 cup fine breadcrumb
1 / 2 teaspoon sage
salt and pepper
1 egg, beaten
2 tablespoons fresh parsley chopped
Combine the melted butter, garlic salt and 1 / 4 teaspoons sage; brush over cut sides and cavity of squash. Salt and pepper to taste.
Bake in a large roasting pan, cut side up, at 400 degrees F for 1 hour, until squash is tender yet still holds its shape. Meanwhile make stuffing: Fry pork sausage until light brown. Remove pork to a colander to drain. Drain all but 2 tablespoons drippings from fry pan. Add onion and celery; sauté 4 minutes. Stir in apple and sauté 2 more minutes.
Combine the pork, vegetables, and breadcrumbs in a large bowl.
Taste and season with sage, salt or pepper if needed (depending on your sausage you may not want to add more seasoning).
Stir in the egg and parsley. Fill the squash halves with stuffing-they should be slightly mounded.
Return to oven and bake, covered, for 20 more minutes, until the egg is set.
Garnish as desired with parsley and shredded Romano cheese.

Napa Cabbage Stir Fry
1 lb. ground Beef, 3 cloves garlic sliced, 1 C chopped onion, 2 T sesame oil, 2 C chopped Carrots, 1 C turnip greens
1 / 2 or whole head Napa Cabbage, sliced thin, use the ribs also, 1 t salt
1 Can organic coconut milk blended with Thai peanut sauce or -1-1/12 C stir fry sauce
1 lb package of wide Thai rice noodles, cooked.
Brown the ground beef in a large pot. Add the carrots, garlic, onions. Stir often over medium heat. When carrots are soft, add the cabbage and salt. Stir often until cabbage is completely wilted down. Add sauce. Serve hot over rice noodles. If you like spicy, use Red Curry paste with coconut milk, instead of peanut sauce.

Carrots, Sweet Potatoes, and Butterkin Squash

Your Share Menu:

Sweet Potatoes
Carrots
Butterkin Squash
Bok-choy
Japanese White Turnips
Garlic
Tasti-Crisp Lettuce Mix
Yellow Onions
Rosemary
Broccoli (Full Share Only)

Many things orange this week to match the amazing array of colors you can see across the tree lines on this "Indian summer" week. Our packing house was filled with the intense minty aroma of our freshly dug carrots. What a great harvest we had this fall and it was well worth the wait! Get ready for their deep earth flavor and luscious color. This week is also the first appearance of our beloved sweet potatoes and get ready to see them until the end of our season and even in to next spring. They are completely cured and ready to store for months, if you wish. Keep them at room temperature, like all other potatoes. I find it to be incredible how most things growing this time of year are naturally able to store long into the winter months to keep us alive and going with the nutrients we so desperately need during hibernation. There is something so satisfying to be eating only what grows naturally in season, locally – throughout the whole year. Our Japanese white turnips are looking incredible and we cannot believe how white and round they look coming right out of the muddy ground. The turnip greens are delicious and called for in many soup recipes to add a taste of mustard greens. For best storage, remove the turnip root from their greens and store separately in the fridge. Anyone craving sweet pumpkin desserts? The wait is over. Cut your butterkin squash in half and witness the beautiful dark orange insides. Scrape out the pulp and seeds and roast face down on a baking sheet @350 for 1 hour. Puree and then add it to your favorite pumpkin recipe. I made my first ever pumpkin sheet cake (recipe on the back and highly recommended). For any other first time pumpkin bakers: yes, the cookie sheet is the right size and depth. And yes, it is supposed to be that runny out of the mixer. Just bake it, have faith, and be impressed with yourself! I took home a very small butterkin and was shocked at how many cups of pumpkin puree I had to work with. I even made a small batch of chocolate chip muffins with the left-overs after an entire sheet cake. Extra pureed squash can always go into the freezer too. Bok-choy continues to come in from the field and pairs perfectly in a stir-fry with the carrots and turnips. Rosemary is a brand new CSA item this year and we are so happy to now have this established for the years to come. Our rosemary plants permanently live in a greenhouse-as they like it hot and dry and require special care. Your rosemary sprig can be kept right on a counter top at room temperature. Strip it from the stem and sprinkle onto most anything before baking. Try tossing cubes of (un-peeled) carrots, turnips, potatoes, and sweet potatoes in olive oil, salt, and rosemary... then roast ...wow! Hope you enjoy this plentiful box of November and all the ideas for this incredible mix of produce.
Cheers to the baking season - Lucas

Khaya's Korner

My sport is gymnastics. Gymnastics has 4 events: floor, bars, vault, and beam. My favorite event is bars because I just learned how to do a kip, which is when you glide, Then you put your feet to the bar, push up, so that your hips are on the bar. Our competition season starts in January, but we haven't started our routines yet. On vault, we do front handsprings over the table. On beam, we do cartwheels, handstands, jumps, leaps, turns, and a front tuck dismount. On floor, we do front and back tumbling. I carpool with my friend Katherine, since our gym is 45 minutes away. It is really fun!
Next week: Hobbies -Khaya

Pumpkin Sheet Cake
Blend together: 2 C Butterkin Squash
1 C oil (or 1 / 2 C canola & 1 / 4 C coconut oil & 1 / 4 C applesauce)
1-1 / 2 C Sugar
4 Eggs
Add and blend:
2 C flour
1 t baking soda
2 t baking powder
2 t cinnamon
1 / 2 t salt
1 C chopped walnuts (optional)
Butter a cookie sheet and spread batter evenly. Bake at 350 degrees for about 20-25 minutes or until done (toothpick inserted comes out clean) Cool the cake and then frost
Cream Cheese Frosting
Blend together and whip with mixer till fluffy and spread over cooled cake
1 / 2 stick butter (4 T)
8oz pkg cream cheese
1 and 1 / 2 C 10x sugar
1 / 8 to 1 / 4 C milk
2 T yogurt or 1 T milk
Optional -- top frosting with about 1 C chopped walnuts

Oven Fries
4 medium baking potatoes or 2 -3 sweet potatoes
2 tbsp oil
Scrub and dry potatoes. Cut into thin sticks or wedges and place in large container with tight lid. Pour oil on potatoes, cover, and shake to thoroughly coat fries with oil.
1 / 2 tsp salt. Sprinkle on fries and mix. Spread fries in a single layer on baking sheets. Bake in oven at 425F until golden brown and fork tender, 30-45 minutes, flipping every 5-10 minutes.
Seasoning options:
Super spicy fries: Rosemary garlic fries:
1 / 3 cup Parmesan cheese 3 cloves garlic (minced)
1 tbsp garlic (minced) 1 tsp dried rosemary (crushed)
1 tsp paprika especially good with sweet potatoes!
1 tsp garlic powder
1 / 2 tbsp ground red pepper
1 / 4 tbsp habanero pepper flakes

SWEET POTATO BUTTER
2 Garlic cloves, freshly ground Pepper to taste, 2 Sweet Potatoes, fine Sea Salt to taste, 2 medium Carrots
2 Tablespoons chopped Parsley, 1 / 2 to 3 / 4 Cup Vegetable broth, 2 Tablespoons chopped Cilantro (Optional)
1 Tablespoon extra-virgin Olive Oil
Put unpeeled garlic cloves on aluminum foil and bake at 350 degrees F. in oven or toaster oven for about 10 minutes, until soft. Microwave or boil unpeeled potatoes until done. Peel carrots, cut into large chunks and microwave or boil until soft. Drain carrots, peel potatoes and put both in a food processor. Squeeze in the baked garlic. Add 1 / 2 cup broth and blend. With motor running, add oil and keep blending, adding more broth until puree is fairly smooth and full. Add salt and pepper to taste. Dip can be made as long as a day in advance, covered and refrigerated. Bring to room temperature for serving and stir in the optional herbs right before serving with raw vegetables and bread sticks.
Makes 6 servings.

The first Bok Choy

This week's projected CSA harvest menu:

Bok Choy
Nicola Gold Potatoes
Broccoli
Yellow Onions
Delicata Squash
Green Cabbage
Cilantro
The last tomatoes (Full Share only)
Cauliflower (Full Share only)

Soup seems to be on everyone's mind this time of year and we are luckily getting into the peak season of all the different kinds of cabbages. I made a delicious concoction of potatoes, cabbage, broccoli, and frozen corn that I look forward to warming me up each day at lunch. We have completed our fall harvest of the very popular and long awaited bok choy. Bok Choy is a variety of Chinese cabbage that has been harvested for over five thousand years! The tops are a deep green leaf resembling romaine lettuce and the bottom looks like a large celery root. You can use the entire vegetable, leaves and stalks. They are mild in flavor and can be used in stir frying, braising, soups, or raw. They are rich in vitamin A and C. If this is your first time cooking with bok choy, try it sautéed with ginger and garlic in sesame oil to release its amazing flavor. Kimchee, which is the Korean name for pickled bok choy, is also a very popular way to consume this type of cabbage. Do not wash until you are ready to use and keep it stored in the fridge. Delicata squash is making its last appearance in the box this week and boy are we so happy we decided to grow it for the first time this year. Once again, the skins are entirely edible, so you can easily cut it into coins and sauté the squash right in a pan with some olive oil and onions. I recommend topping it off with a splash of balsamic vinegar and some parmesan cheese.

Cilantro -in the end of October? This year, we had an extremely dry summer that made it very hard to grow and maintain many types of herbs. Cilantro happens to be a very hearty plant that can grow well -even after the first frost. It needs a very wet environment to grow in so we thought we would take a chance and get some into the ground fast – and here it is to give your fall share some flavor! Cilantro paired with lemon or other citrus fruit goes great on chicken and fish. I like cilantro to the point of replacing lettuce with it on a sandwich or burger. Perhaps you still have some tomatoes and peppers left to mix up a quick little batch of salsa. I also recommend cilantro paired with barbeque sauce and chicken on a pizza! The taste combinations are endless...

On the horizon: All of the sweet potatoes have been dug up and are currently curing in their precisely needed temperature and humidity level. Curing preps the sweet potatoes for long term use and allows them to keep up to 6 months! Get ready for their first appearance in your share next week!! -Lucas

Khaya's Korner

El otono es mi estacion favorita! That is Spanish for "Fall is my favorite season!" I love Fall because there are leaf piles to jump in, it freezes overnight, and most importantly Thanksgiving. Just thinking about all those pies and turkey dinner makes me hungry. Pumpkin pie is my favorite. It makes my mouth water. Also, I prefer cold over hot, so Fall is really the season for me! I like bundling up over-excessively with a hat, scarf, gloves, and a warm winter jacket. The part I don't like is the unbundling of all the garments. It's a really tough struggle!
Next week: Gymnastics - Khaya

Bok Choy Stir-Fry
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 -3 cloves garlic, minced
1 / 4 teaspoon ground ginger
1 / 4 teaspoon ground black pepper
4 cups bok choy, thinly sliced
1 chicken bouillon cube, dissolved in 1/2 c. water
1 / 4 cup soy sauce
1 teaspoon granulated sugar
1 tablespoon cornstarch
Directions:
Heat oil in saucepan over medium heat. Add garlic, ginger, black pepper, and bok choy.
Stir fry about 3 min.
In bowl, combine dissolved bouillon and water, soy sauce, sugar, and cornstarch. Whisk well.
Add cornstarch mixture to skillet and stir fry until sauce thickens and cabbage is tender, about 3 min.
Serve hot. Servings: 4-6

Crunchy Cabbage Slaw from CSA member Kate Pratt
1 / 2 head of cabbage, red or green or combination of the two, very thinly sliced and chopped
1 large carrot, grated or made into ribbons with a vegetable peeler
3-4 green onions chopped or 1 / 4 red onion finely sliced and chopped
3-4 minced bell pepper (orange snack peppers, anyone?)
3 T fresh chopped herbs such as cilantro or parsley
1 / 2 lime or lemon, freshly squeezed
2 t olive oil
Salt and pepper to taste

Roasted Winter Squash Medley submitted by CSA member Claudia Black
Ingredients:
2 lb winter squash mix, peeled and cubed (acorn, delicata, butternut, etc.)
1 T melted butter
1 T olive oil
1.5 T spice mix (a blend of cayenne pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, paprika, salt & pepper – to taste)
Instructions:
Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Cut the squash, clean out the pulp and seeds, peel the skin with a potato peeler, and cut the pieces into bite-size cubes. In a large bowl, toss the squash cubes with the melted butter and olive oil, then add the spice blend. Spread the squash in a single layer on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Bake for 40 minutes, tossing once halfway through so the cubes brown evenly. Serve warm.
Recipe adapted from Gina Homolka of skinnytaste.com

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