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Weekly Farm Newsletter

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June 27

Your Share Menu:

Green Leaf Lettuce
Store in a bag in the fridge with a paper towel to absorb any extra moisture

Green & Gold Zucchini
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Red Beets
Store in a bag in the fridge

Sweet Potatoes
Do not refrigerate
Store in a cool dark place

Fresh Herb: Mint, Parsley, or Sage
Store in a sealed bag in the fridge

Mixed Lettuce Greens
Store in the veg drawer of the fridge

Garlic Scapes
Store in the fridge

Cucumber
Store in the fridge

Swiss Chard
Store in a sealed bag in the fridge

Black Raspberries - Full Share gets covered 1st
Sore in the fridge. Eat ASAP

Red Beets bleed with health boosting nutrients! They are loaded with vitamin C, folate, and potassium fiber. You can store beets in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to 3 weeks. When preparing them, first rinse and scrub the dirt, then trim the stems to one-inch-long (otherwise the color will bleed when they are cooked). Place them in a pot and just barely cover with cold water. Bring to a boil and simmer until tender (approximately 25-40 minutes, less, depending on size.) Drain; allow to cool to room temperature. With a paring knife, slip off the skins, slice, chop, or leave whole. Cooked beets are also good cold -added to salad or you can peel and shred to make a raw beet salad.

Our fresh mint is ready just in time for some 4th of July mojitos. Mint can be added to any drink, dessert, or salad for a refreshing taste combination. Mint has been known to cure stomach aches and cramps by naturally relaxing the digestive-tract muscles in the body. Add a tablespoon of fresh mint to hot water for an ancient healer. Mint is very easy to grow at home and is "fool-proof" as it flourishes in the shade or sun. It is a perennial that can easily become invasive – so be careful where you plant it. You can place the stems of mint in a cup of water and produce roots to replant into your own pot. Craving fresh iced tea yet?

Zucchini, like all squash, has its ancestry in the Americas. However, the varieties of squash that most of us eat today were developed in Italy many generations after their introduction from the Americas. Zucchini comes from the Italian word Zucca which means pumpkin. It is very prevalent in Italian, German, and American cuisine. If you do any traveling to France or the U.K., look for dishes with courgette – an alternative word for zucchini in that area of Europe. One average-size zucchini is equivalent to only 18 food calories! Not to mention an abundancy of potassium and pro-vitamin A.

On the horizon:
Our greenhouse tomato crop is quickly turning from green to pink, meaning red ripened tomatoes will be appearing in your CSA shares soon! The beautiful black and purple eggplants are flowering and beginning to produce tiny "eggs." All of the onions, shallots, and garlic are enjoying the dry weather and getting bigger in the ground every week. Hot peppers have begun to take form and the outdoor tomatoes and cucumbers are standing tall! Corn is growing inches by the day along with our melon crop. The flower and herb gardens have "popped" and are attracting our precious pollinators around the farm. Thyme, oregano, and more basil is soon on its way to you! We have been busy clearing and cleaning out most of our greenhouse crops as we transition into full outdoor growing capabilities until late October. Bigger boxes each week – get ready for the summer bounty!

Khaya's Korner: My Interests

One of my top interests is gymnastics. I really want a real set of uneven bars and a professional mat, but I'm going to have to work to earn money for them. So, every other day, I get paid to work mid-day to lunch with my dad at the farm. While, I'm more in to gardening, it's totally worth it. I want to pursue my dreams and go to the Olympics one day. If I want to do that, I have to work toward my goal by practicing as much as I can. Plus, I like working at the farm. It is a way to exercise and get stronger.
So, this summer, pursue your dream, and reach for the gold! ~Khaya

HARVARD BEETS
2 cups of cooked diced beets
5 T red wine vinegar
2 t cornstarch
fresh pepper to taste
1 / 2 cup sugar
1 / 4 cup orange juice
1 / 2 t salt
1 T butter
Combine the sugar, vinegar, orange juice, cornstarch, salt, and pepper in a heavy sauce. Whisk well and bring to a boil over medium heat, whisking constantly until mixture is clear and thick (approx. 4-5 min.). Whisk in the butter, pour the sauce over the beets, and toss. Serve hot or at room temperature. May be refrigerated and warmed to room temp for make ahead prep.

Farmer Mike's Zucchini Crab cakes
4 C zucchini grated, do not peel
1 / 2 C Parmesan cheese
2 C Italian seasoned breadcrumbs
2 - 3 t Old Bay seasoning
1 T mayonnaise
4 eggs
1 T onion, minced
2 cloves garlic, minced
Mix all ingredients together. Form into patties. If too moist, keep adding breadcrumbs until they can be formed without too much stickiness. Then coat each side of the cakes with breadcrumbs and fry in hot oil until browned and then flip and fry the other side. Top with a slice of your favorite cheese and serve on a bun with tomato and lettuce.

Chocolate Chip Zucchini Loaf
2 and 1 / 2 cups flour
1 / 2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
1 and 1 / 2 tsp. Baking powder
1 tsp. Baking soda
1 tsp. Cinnamon
3 / 4 tsp. Salt
1 C Sugar
3 / 4 cup egg substitute or 3 large eggs
1 / 2 cup unsweetened applesauce
1 / 3 cup vegetable oil
2 tsp. Vanilla
2 cups packed, grated zucchini
1 / 2 cup mini- chocolate chips
Preheat oven to 350. Spray two 8x4-inch loaf pans with oil. Set aside. In a large bowl combine flour, cocoa, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon and salt. Set aside. In a medium bowl whisk together sugar, egg substitute, applesauce, oil, and vanilla. Stir in zucchini. Add wet ingredients to dry ingredients and stir until moistened. Fold in chocolate chips. Place in prepared pans and bake for 50 minutes, or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool for 5 minutes in pan, and then remove.

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